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Found 6,932 Collections

 

Smithsonian Social Studies Online: How do maps reflect change and continuity in history? / Smithsonian Estudios Sociales en Línea: ¿Cómo reflejan los mapas cambios y continuidad en la historia?

This collection contains lesson plans and resources from across the Smithsonian to help students critically examine this essential question through multiple Social Studies content areas. 

Esta colección contiene planes de lecciones y recursos de todo el Smithsonian para ayudar a estudiantes a examinar críticamente esta esencial pregunta a través de múltiples areas de contenido en Estudios Sociales.

National Museum of American History
24
 

Smithsonian Social Studies Online: Do technological advances change history? / Smithsonian Estudios Sociales en Línea: ¿Cambian la historia los avances tecnológicos?​

This collection contains lesson plans and resources from across the Smithsonian to help students critically examine this essential question through multiple Social Studies content areas. 

Esta colección contiene planes de lecciones y recursos de todo el Smithsonian para ayudar a estudiantes a examinar críticamente esta esencial pregunta a través de múltiples areas de contenido en Estudios Sociales.

National Museum of American History
30
 

Puffy Head, Chicken Legs

The Pufffy Head, Chicken Legs Smithsonian Science Starter Collection 

Students will investigate the effects of gravity on the human body. 

Students will make direct observations on their bodies in upright and prone positions, and consider the long-term effects.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
5
 

Spacesuit Taternauts

This Smithsonian Science Starter investigates how the layers of a spacesuit protect astronauts when they are outside of the International Space Station. This lesson includes a simulated spacesuit design challenge to create a suit that protects from micrometeoroids.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), orbital debris, micrometeoroid, kinetic energy

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
5
 

A Cool Lesson on Thermal Expansion

This Smithsonian Science Starter Collection investigates the expansion and contraction of metal due to changes in temperature.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, thermal expansion, space walk, Breznik, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
5
 

Spot the Station

This collection investigates the geometry of the orbit of the International Space Station (ISS) and its motion relative to Earth.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, orbital motion

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
5
 

How to Launch a Rocket

Learn About Rocket Launches Using Balloons - Smithsonian Science Starter

Students will investigate how rocketry works, and the role of Newton’s Second and Third Laws of Motion in explaining rocket motion.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
5
 

Using Waves to Communicate

This Smithsonian Science Starter collection investigates the difference between longitudinal waves and transverse waves, and how they are able to transmit energy from one location to another. Students will explore ways to deal with line of sight obstructions and consider the impact of such methods with regard to interplanetary communication.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, radio waves

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
7
 

Modeling a Solar Eclipse

This Smithsonian Science Starter investigates the alignment of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun during a solar eclipse, and has students model that alignment with classroom materials.

Keywords: #airandspace, NASM, National Air and Space Museum, Boeing

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
7
 

fish

fyi

jen stebbing
14
 

District of Creativity: Ira Blount, Washington, D.C. Artist

“Peace of mind comes to me through making things with my hands. An added bonus comes if my efforts inspire others to try the creative process.” 

-Ira Blount, 2009

Meet Washington, D.C. artist Ira Blount. Be inspired by Ira Blount's work. Respond to his call for creativity: Make something!


Creativity brought comfort to Washington, D.C. artist Ira Blount. He hoped others might also find solace in the creative process. He even crafted his artist's statement into a piece of art that can be shared with others.

Ira Blount tried many different forms of art, including wood carving, quilting, calligraphy, basketry, origami, paper cutting, tin punching, beading, and leathercraft. His artistic quest gave him personal satisfaction, but it also connected him with other artists, including the Basket Bunch, a group of basket makers in Prince Georges County, Maryland, and the Daughters of Dorcas and Sons, a quilting guild in Anacostia, a neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C.  It also linked him to traditions around the world, such as origami, the Japanese art of paper folding.

This Learning Lab offers:

  • ideas for making art, including links to instructions for making origami cranesbeaded bracelets, and twined baskets
  • links to additional prompts to facilitate, in the artist's words, trying the creative process
  • discussion questions for "Creative Conversations," including
    • How can the process of creating lead to "peace of mind?" 
    • How can creativity connect us with others, in our communities and beyond? 
    • How can it reconnect us with nature and with ourselves?

Very young children can look, with their families and caregivers, for animals and colors in Ira Blount's artwork. 

School-age children can look for the letters in the two alphabet samplers.

Keywords: Anacostia Community Museum, ACM, African, American, Ira, Blount, artist, creativity, Washington, DC, United States, #ACMTeach

Jennifer Sieck
30
 

Autumn Mountains, after Wang Yuanqi (Translation)

Wu’s Landscapes of Southern China: A master of literati painting in the late Qing dynasty, Wu Yunlai, also known as Wu Zhongyuan, was born in Qiantang (present-day Hangzhou). Trained by his mother in painting, calligraphy, and poetry, Wu producedan outstanding array of works in various mediums from landscape painting on paper or silk to painted ceramic panels. The twelve landscape paintings in this album depict the serene and reclusive scenes of southern China, a subject favored by educated elites. Stylistically these paintings illustrate Wu’s study of early masters and his creative individual style, evident in his vivid use of color and his success in poetry and calligraphy.

Xingyu Liu
1
 

Visualizing Democracy

This Learning Lab complements the National Portrait Gallery's student program, Visualizing Democracy. 

Students will visualize democracy from the colonial era to the 21st century by analyzing portraits of major figures who played a critical role—as government officials, engaged citizens, or both—in creating a democratic society for the United States. Students will investigate how portraiture can convey democratic ideals and how, as a cultural institution housed in a historic building, the National Portrait Gallery has been and continues to be relevant to American democracy.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
95
 

Flights of Fancy Three High Flying Friends

This collection accompanies the Flights of Fancy Story Time Online and has resources to explore the friendship between pioneering pilots Amelia Earhart, Ruth Nichols, and Louise Thaden. 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
17
 

Easy PZ: The 3 Ys (Theme: Environmental Issues)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "The 3 Ys" with a museum resource from the National Portrait Gallery to encourage learners to discern the significance of a topic in global, local, and personal contexts.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
13
 

Easy PZ: The 3 Ys (Theme: Human Evolution)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "The 3 Ys" with a museum resource from the National Portrait Gallery to encourage learners to discern the significance of a topic in global, local, and personal contexts.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
14
 

Introduction of COVID 19

COVID 19 is shorten by coronavirus disease in 2019 and first found in Wuhan, China. Due to the modern rapid transportation, the inflection has spread to many of the counties and being a huge pandemic to all the human-beings. 

Xingyu Liu
1
 

Rain or Shine: The US Postal Service

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the Postal Service. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about the postal service troubles as well as explore videos about how our mail is delivered. Families can learn about a dog that helped deliver the mail. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
81
 

Stitched Stories of Texas

Quilts can keep you warm, be works of art, tell a story about an event in the makers life or commemorate a historical event.    These quilts made by Texas women are examples of their desire to commemorate and remember the stories of their lives and the lives of others.  Some of the quilts have been passed down through family-others are contemporary.  Each has a unique story to tell and highlights the culture and craftsmanship of a particular time in history.

 

Texas Folklife
42
 

Latinx Portraiture

Collection created by the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center to accompany Found-Object Portraiture Project. Find images of students work at #macceduportraiture
Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
38
 

Asian Art at Home: Explore Japanese Art

Let the wonder and the beauty of the museum come to you!  Explore Japanese art with educators from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with these three lessons.  Each lesson features guided looking at Japanese art and an art-making component.  Each lesson can stand alone; complete one, two, or all three lessons as time allows.  The content needed for each lesson is divided by an arrow; look to the right of each arrow to view the information you need for each lesson.  The lessons are designed for students in 1st through 5th grades.

Did you give one of these lessons a try?  Tag us using #FreerSackler or @FreerSackler on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter.  Email us at AsiaTeachers@si.edu and we will post your work in the Art Gallery section of this page.

Lesson One: Japan and DC Landscapes

  • Explore the landscapes of Japan! Young learners will see, think, and wonder about Japanese landscape paintings as they think about their favorite landscapes of DC.  After seeing and wondering about the landscapes of Japan, learners will sketch their favorite DC landscape. This lesson will take 30-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 4th.  Especially designed for the DCPS 3rd grade spring ELA unit on DC landmarks:  Students learn about various monuments, historical and cultural landmarks, and neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. They deepen their understanding of D.C.’s famous cultural and historical landmarks. 

Lesson Two:  Exploring Japanese Landscapes

  • Young learners will zoom in and explore two works of art by the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1839).  Learners will be invited to make two sketches:  a symbol to represent themselves and a sketch of their favorite month or season.  This lesson will take 20-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 3rd.  Especially designed for the DCPS 1st grade spring ELA unit on symbols:  Students learn about common American symbols [...]. Things and figures can be symbolic and have meaning to people. They make connections to the texts [works of art] by thinking about their values and what symbols best represent them.

Lesson Three:  Make a Mini Japanese Folding Screen

  • Daydream and get crafty!  Learners will create a landscape of their dreams.  After a guided meditation, learners will use collage to create a miniature Japanese folding screen using a cereal box or other items found around the home.  The lesson includes modifications if supplies are limited.  Time needed:  40 minutes - 2 hours, depending on supplies on hand and skill level.  For 1st grade through 5th grade.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
21
 

angels

;p

jen stebbing
3
 

The Portraits

This Learning Lab consists of all portraits found within student programs at the National Portrait Gallery.

Nicole Vance
121
 

Geronimo

Students will take a look at how artists have portrayed the famous Native American,Geronimo.

Karen Gibbs
9
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