Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(327)
(877)
(1,046)
(918)
(1,161)
(20)
(464)
(362)
(175)
(678)
(245)
(258)

Found 1,204 Collections

 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Action

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Action: Stay woke. We have a social contract with one another to protect the vulnerable and ensure human rights for everyone," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, immigration, migration, activism, gender, inclusion and social media.

"What were the different forms of marginalization and discrimination against Asian Pacific American communities, and how did such oppression lead to action being taken to assert their place as equal citizens in the United States? For this collection, I examined different principles and foundations for oppression and prejudice against Asian Pacific Americans, as well as the different ways that these communities took action against such marginalization to represent themselves as equal Americans." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
23
 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Beauty

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Beauty: Who gets to decide what counts as beautiful? Question aesthetic classifications and priorities," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, gender, inclusion and social media. 

"A glance at how the aesthetics of Asian Pacific American cultures have been presented, embraced, celebrated, and manipulated in society. For this collection, I went through searches around Asian Pacific American cultures to look at both things that were considered traditionally beautiful and things with beauty not as direct. Examining objects from paintings to designed plates helped to explore what was considered beautiful in many different lenses. The goal was to look at and analyze the presence of beauty in different forms, from stereotypes in Hollywood to architecture, and interpret what these symbolized for a larger society." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
26
 

What Makes You Say That?: Civil War Photograph

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will investigate a photograph from the Civil War taken by the studio of Mathew Brady, one of the most prominent American photographers of the 19th century.  The Civil War was the first major war captured on camera and photographs, like this one, played a pivotal role in shaping public perceptions of the conflict.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying soldiers' experiences during the Civil War, photography's effect on public perspectives about war, and more.  Resources to extend this activity include: a Smithsonian American Art Museum lesson plan investigating this and other photographs from the Civil War, a blog post discussing connections between Civil War photography and President Abraham Lincoln, a Smithsonian Magazine article about Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner, a Learning Lab collection on Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War, and an article discussing the National Portrait Gallery's recent exhibition The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.

Keywords: photo, battlefield, inquiry strategy

Tess Porter
8
 

Brittania's 1920's Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to describe the time and artifacts of the 20's. This collection shows symbols that represented the 1920's particularly the areas of:

  • Prohibition
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Fundamentalism
  • New Roles for Women
  • Jazz Music
Brittania Fonder
15
 

Exploring Complexity: Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way

In this activity, students will analyze an artwork that celebrates the idea of Manifest Destiny and western expansion - Emanuel Leutze's 1861 mural study for Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, the final version of which rests in the U.S. Capitol Building.  Through the use of two Project Zero Thinking routines - What makes you say that?, a Visible Thinking routine for interpretation and justification; and Parts, Purposes, Complexities, an Agency by Design routine for looking closely - students will consider what message this painting conveys, how choices made by the artist convey that message, as well as what perspectives are portrayed and what perspectives are missing.  After looking critically, students will watch a video and learn from senior curator Richard Murray how to read this painting and what messages/images they may have missed.

This activity can be used as an entry point or supplement in studying westward expansion, the idea of Manifest Destiny, how public perspectives are shaped, and more.  Resources to extend this activity include: a website about the final mural located in the U.S. Capitol Building and a Smithsonian American Art Museum lesson plan about both the mural study and the final mural.

Keywords: Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze, manifest destiny, westward expansion

Tess Porter
7
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Sarah Billups
9
 

Auspicious Symbols in Qing Dynasty Textiles

How can clothing and textiles reveal what was valued in Qing dynasty (1644-1912 CE) China?  How did Chinese cultural associations with the natural world influence fashion and decor of Qing dynasty nobility?  Closely examine Qing dynasty clothing and home furnishings and decor from Freer|Sackler collections to discover auspicious symbols.  Learn about each symbol's significance in Chinese culture. Then, test your eyes and see if you can locate the symbols in other textile examples by answering guided questions. A glossary and exhibition resources are provided for teacher reference.  This Learning Lab Collection was designed as a resource for the Empresses of China's Forbidden City, 1644-1912 exhibition on view at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery March 30 - June 23, 2019.  

Tags:  art; silk; brocade; embroidery; tapestry; velvet; twill; patterns; China; good fortune; clothing; costume; dress; regalia; symbolism; imperial; court; furnishings; nature; plants; animals; flowers; birds 

Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Representation of Australian Culture

How has Australia, the Australian people and the Australian culture been represented to people overseas? How do people from other nations view Australia, the Australian people and the Australian culture?
Colin Radici
8
 

Slavery

Stimulus for art work or essay on slavery in America. Students  to create a drawing or painting using images to portray the the pain of slavery. Student can select a variety of media.  The essay could be based upon the first person experience  looking through the eyes of a slave.

Mark Poore
8
 

Investigating: Civil War Portraits

In this student activity, students will investigate nine portraits of people involved in the Civil War, both from the Union and the Confederacy. Through these portraits, students will gain an understanding of: experiences of people on both sides of the war; why these people are seen as historically significant; and how portraiture can communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen. Included with each portrait is a video that explains the historical significance of the person depicted.

Big Ideas: 

  • Why are these people, and the developments they shaped, seen as historically significant? 
  • How does portraiture communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen?

Ross Bosse
10
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
21
 

Museum

This is my digital story of my experience visiting the American History Museum in Washington D.C. 

#smithstories

Stephanie Palencia
0
 

2019 National High School Design Competition

2019 CHALLENGE

Cooper Hewitt is delighted to announce the theme of the 2019 National High School Design Competition: The Nature of Design: What would you design (or redesign) that is a nature-based solution to a global problem?

ABOUT THE COMPETITION

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum launched the National High School Design Competition in collaboration with Target in 2016. Every year, students around the country are challenged to design a solution to a unique scenario, inspired by Cooper Hewitt’s rich collection and stimulating exhibitions.

Visit Cooper Hewitt website to learn more  
WWW.COOPERHEWITT.ORG/DESIGNCOMPETITION


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
19
 

Making it to the Moon and Back; NASA World History Project

We are doing our project on NASA's tragedies in getting to the moon, then finally making it to the moon with Apollo 11.

Elliana Stuart
20
 

How Pittsburgh Helped Us Get to the Moon: Alcoa and the Lunar Module

This Learning Lab collection is designed to accompany the Pittsburgh CLO's teacher guide for Beyond the Moon. In this new Gallery of Heroes musical, fifteen-year-old Maya has big dreams of being the first person to set foot on Mars but believes she is simply too ordinary to become an astronaut. Her view of what is possible transforms when actual NASA astronauts past and present, including Neil Armstrong, Mae Jemison, and José Hernandez, take her on an amazing journey to discover that extraordinary feats are accomplished by regular people one step at a time.

The activity is based on "Touchdown," created by PBS Kids Design Squad. It was adapted by the Heinz History Center to include the story of the Alcoa aluminum innovation used for the legs of the Lunar Module. 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
5
 

Christmas Past and Present for First Grade

How did families celebrate Christmas then and now?

1.H.1.2 Explain the importance of folklore and celebrations and their impact on local communities.


Christina Hawkins
6
 

La Pursimia Mission State Historic Park Ruins

In 1834, Secularization of the 21 Missions of California was enforced.  This meant California Missions were either converted into Catholic Churches or reduced to ranches, or to other uses.  As a result La Purisima Mission property and land holdings were divided into ranches.

As the years progressed the property was bought and sold a number of times. In 1845, La Purisima Mission was sold to Juan Temple of Los Angeles for $1,000. At the close of the 19th century the property was so badly neglected the adobe buildings, and other features of the Mission eventually collapsed from weather and lack of upkeep.

In 1933, Union Oil Company obtained ownership of La Purisima Mission for oil speculation, and the condition of the Mission was in complete ruin. It wasn't until 1934, when preservation and reconstruction of the Mission began through efforts of the County of Santa Barbara, the State of California, the National Park Service, and the Civilian Conservation Corps. 

This collection shows the neglect and decay of the adobe buildings at  La Purisima  Mission through the lens of history.



La Purisima Mission State Historic Park
8
 

Dorothea Lange

A photographic study of the Great Depression.

Sarah Dahl
16
 

Women in World War II

This collection teaches students about the changing role of women during World War II: their role in the workplace, increasing presence in the military, and participation in voluntary organizations that supported the war. Students should think about how these activities reinforced traditional notions of gender divisions while they also allowed women to experience new activities.
Jessica Rosenberry
24
 

The Edward H. & Rosamund B. Spicer Photos of Yaqui Culture

The Rosamund B. and Edward H. Spicer of photographs of Yoeme (Yaqui) documents lifeways, culture, ceremonies, and families from the mid-1930s to the early 1940s in the villages of Old Pascua, Arizona and Potom, Sonora, Mexico.

Arizona State Museum
21
 

Becoming the Historian: Historical Context

Historical thinking skills allow historians to better practice and interpret history. This series teaches students how to develop these skills to become better historians themselves.

This Learning Lab will guide students through the process of defining historical context and practicing employing strategies from an example dealing with the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. 

 Historical context is the background information that informs a deeper understanding of a historical individual, group or event. Historical context is important because it allows historians to better understand history in the ways a historical individual or group understood the world around them, which leads historians to analyze the past more accurately. 

 Keywords: nmaahc, African, American, historical, thinking, skills, context, historical, contextualization, background, 1968, Poor People's Campaign, history, interpret, analyze

NMAAHC Education
15
 

Korean Art: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in celadon ceramics in order to understand the artistic practices and aesthetics of the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  Many of the Goryeo celadons in the Freer|Sackler's collections originally adorned palaces, Buddhist temples, and private residences of the aristocracy.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying ceramics, Korean art, the Goryeo dynasty, and more.  Click Read More for ideas about how to prompt further inquiry using the Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine "Think / Puzzle / Explore" and resources on the elements of art and principles of design.

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: clay, pottery, sculpture, vessel, cheongja

Tess Porter
13
 

Korean Burial Practices in the Goryeo Period

In this activity, students will explore personal objects found in stone caskets from the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  After looking closely at the types of objects found, students will consider why these particular objects may have been chosen to memorialize the deceased, what this may reveal about those who lived during the Goryeo period, and similarities and differences in how objects are used in the burial practices of other cultures.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying Korea during the Goryeo period, cross-cultural and cross-historical funerary practices, and more.

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: archaeology, archaeologist, tomb, funeral, death

Tess Porter
16
 

Korean Buddhist Painting: Looking Closely

In this activity, students will use visual evidence to explore and study an exceptionally rare Buddhist painting from the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  This painting depicts Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of infinite compassion, and scholars believe images like this were created to aid private meditation.  Use this activity can as an entry point into studying Buddhism in Korea, Korea during the Goryeo period, and more. 

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: water moon avalokiteshvara, avalokitesvara, religion, buddha, 

Tess Porter
4
1-24 of 1,204 Collections