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Found 422 Collections

 

Movement

This collection uses Eric Carle's book From Head to Toe to explore how animals and people move. To talk about the book with your child, first read From Head to Toe together (or watch the video in the first box). Next, let your child look at the other animals on the webpage and decide what he/she wants to explore. Encourage conversation and exploration!

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
27
 

Looking at the Moon

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
19
 

STEAM: Cross-curricular Connections for Young Learners

Artwork, museums, and the community are powerful resources that bring concepts to life with young children. This collection provides examples of how to utilize museums and the community to explore STEM concepts through artwork. 

This collection was created by a Smithsonian Early Enrichment faculty member to support a webinar with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, presented in October  24, 2018.  


Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
81
 

Bison, Zebras, and Kangaroos - Smithsonian Collection

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
44
 

Grasshopper - Lesson

  • Compare and Contrast the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper to the Conehead Grasshopper


    • Colors
    • Ability to move
    • Shape and size
  • Explore grasshopper's mouth pieces that are used for grinding 

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
7
 

Salmon Give Life: Learning from Alaska’s First Peoples

There are five species of salmon in Alaska, and they are a vital food source for people living a subsistence lifestyle today and in the past. Alaska Natives determined that salmon skin, carefully processed, was a durable and waterproof material for clothing, and they used it to make bags, boots, mittens and parkas. Some artists continue to use this material in their work. The curriculum below consists of five activity-based lessons and will teach students about subsistence, with a focus on salmon, and how Alaska Natives utilize local resources to survive and thrive. The two videos referred to in curriculum Lesson 3 are provided below and are part of a 10-video set on this site in the Community Videos section, titled Sewing Salmon videos.

Tags: Alaska, Alaska Native, Indigenous, salmon, subsistence, traditional ecological knowledge, salmon skin, museum, museum objects, artifacts, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
7
 

Botanical Expressions

At the turn of the 20th century, the intersection of botanical study with design practice stimulated an array of plant forms and motifs in furnishings, glassware, ceramics, textiles, and more. Botanical Expressions reveals how designers, inspired by nature and informed by scientific knowledge, created vibrant new designs in America, Britain, France, and the Netherlands. Blossoming vases, plantlike stuctures, fanciful garden illustrations, and a diversity of vegetal and floral patterns reveal how nature and design dynamically merged.

An increasing number of designers, trained as botanists, advocated for the beauty and order of nature’s systems, colors, and patterns. Many manufacturers operated in proximity to gardens for natural study and stocked books of botanical illustrations as resources for their designers. These primary sources, on loan from Smithsonian Libraries, appear alongside the objects they influenced.

Since the 19th century, the garden was often seen as a refuge from industry and a natural source of plenty and pleasure. This history of botanical expressions in design illuminates a reflection on the critical role of nature within our world.

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
66
 

Exploring Systems

Systems can be vast or miniscule. They can be man-made or occur in nature. A system can be simple or complex but all systems are have various parts. Each of the parts have functions within the system and each system has its own function (what a part or system is used for is called its function)

In this collection, students investigate a variety of systems by viewing and reading about them. 

This collection can be used in the classroom as students explore the crosscutting concept of systems and system models across a variety of science disciplines. The collection can also be used in a design thinking course or unit or as students undertake engineering projects and explore processes and systems.

This collection is designed for students to use independently either in class or on their own. The collection can also be used as a small group or whole class activity driven by discussion instead of writing.

The task is provided in the first slide in the collection. Extension activities can be applied to the task. One extension is included in the task slide and prompts students to use the Learning Lab to seek out their own example of a system and explain its parts and functions. A more interactive class based extension might be for students to circulate and look for a partner/partners who chose the same system or can find a way to make connections between two or more different systems that they chose. Partnerships/teams can then compare the parts/functions that they have identified and prepare to share with the larger class community.



Sue Pike
36
 

Where would we BEE without them?

Explore bees' behavior and their role in pollination through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

Keywords: animal, insect, plant adaptation, animal communication, flowers, pollen, honey, hive, engineering, entomologist, pollinator, colony, system

Sue Pike
61
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.#ISTE2016
Sue Pike
17
 

MUHS IB Biology Pentadactly Limbs

Borrowed from Greta von Bargen, Skyline High

Keith Wilkerson
136
 

Panda-monium

This is a collection of pandas from around the world.

Kathy Mulder
4
 

Consciousness and instincts

When watching at birds you get surprised how well they build nests. Birds do it being obsessed by instincts. Nonetheless lions hunting catch victims not only are led by instincts. During hunting they can creat groups. And here a question arises. What makes them hunt with a group, instincts or all the same they are conscious of the process of groupping? What can do instinct? May it creat groups for so complicated process as hunting? Although in case with birds is seen well that instints assign birds to build nests. Birds conduct this process and fully act by influence of instincts. Instincts schedule birds. Supposed that lions hunt and unite in groups for hunting being under instincts. Then it points that instincts make organizational work. And what then is consciousness of a human? If instincts can handle so complicated process as groupping hunt then it can be supposed that instincts can manage consciousness of a human and task a human what to do. Here it is seen that instincts and consciousness tightly linked with one another.

Yura Yura
0
 

The Monsters of Our Minds or The Monsters of This Earth

For decades humans have depicted art in various forms that consist of monsters. This made me ask myself; what exactly is a monster? These pieces of art consist of images that their creators describe as monsters. I am going to delve in to the history behind these objects and symbols to figure out if they are really monsters or if our ideas of what makes an object or a person a monster skewed.

mariana addo
15
 

Preventing the Dodo: Unveiling Animal Conservation Stories

What stories do the animals on the American Trail at the Smithsonian's National Zoo tell? Students will use the Project Zero Global Thinking Routine Unveiling Stories to uncover and consider the complexity around conservation. I asked students to consider more than just what is the initial story. I wanted to know what they thought the human and world stories might be. With the success of these animals I wanted students to also consider what the new and untold stories that might remain. The Unveiling Stories thinking routine is a great way to explore the complicated stories of the gray wolf, bald eagle, beaver,  North American river otter, and wood duck. #goglobal

Ellen Rogers
39
 

What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene?

This collection was designed to serve as a bridge between the high school biology units of evolution and ecology as students explore the evolution of humanity through both a biological and moral lens.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various artifacts from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History as they grapple with answering the overarching question: What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene?  #GoGlobal

What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene? : Students answer/revise their initial answers to the overarching question after gaining additional knowledge from various learning activities: 

  • Claim/Support/Question:  Students use the Claim/Support/Question thinking routine to frame their thinking around and grapple with this question.
  • Skull Analysis > Human Evolution Misconceptions: After the discussion on human evolution misconceptions, students can revise their thoughts on "what it means to be human" and begin to develop a class list on the characteristics shared by humans.
  • Constructing an Ancestral Timeline: After constructing their timeline, students will have gained additional an understanding of specific morphological and behavioral characteristics of humans. 

Using this Collection: 

  • Detailed suggestions on how to implement the learning activities are found in the "information" section of each of the Blue Activity Tiles as well as the Project Zero Thinking Routine Tiles.
  • Notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection.  

Global Competence Connection:

  • Students will be challenged to “investigate the world” both in a modern and prehistoric sense as they explore this the resources in this collection.
  • One goal of this collection is to inspire students to take action as a result of considering the impacts that modern humans have had on the planet. 

Additional Questions Explored through this Collection:

  • What (specific behaviors, adaptations, etc.) allow species to survive?
    • This question can be highlighted during the skull sorting and analysis activities in order to help students review the concepts of adaptation, evolution by natural selection, etc. 
      • Extension: Teachers can project photos of these species in their natural environments and ask students to identify the adaptations that aid them in survival. This exploration can be used to explore full-body morphological differences between humans and non-humans.    
    • This question can also be explored as students analyze the Human Evolution Timeline Interactive. Teachers can ask students to compare and contrast the adaptations of various hominid species and propose ways in which these adaptations aided species to survive in their various environments. 
  • How have climatic changes impacted the survival of species over time?
    • This question can be presented as students explore the Interactive Human Evolution Timeline. The timeline presents data showing how the Earth's climate has fluctuated over the 8 million years of human evolution and highlights the fact that some of the most important milestones in human evolution occurred during the greatest climatic fluctuations. 
    • Teachers can use this exploration to foreshadow upcoming discussions of modern climate change.
  • How fragile is human life?
    • The Human Family Tree and Human Evolution Timeline interactives allow for thoughtful exploration of this question as they provide visualizations of hominid existence, individual species' lifespans in geologic time, and extinctions. 
    • Teachers can highlight the small amount of time that modern humans have existed in comparison to early humans as well as points in history that modern humans were faced with events that nearly caused extinction and ask students to grapple with the fragility of human life.  
  • Why do we matter as humans in the anthropocene?
    • This question serves as the bridge into the study of ecology and human impacts on the environment and challenges students to deeply consider their importance to their world. 


Aleah Myers
32
 

Erosion, Deposition and Weathering

Select one artifact in this collection to do "slow looking" using a See, Think, and Wonder.

Debbie Tannenbaum
12
 

Designing Alternative Energy Solutions

Climate change is a huge issue facing our society. Our students have expressed tremendous concerns about the global impact of the climate crisis.

As part of this learning lab, student teams are tasked with designing and prototyping an alternative energy solution for NYC.

Before embarking on their own designs, students will use the resources to learn about earlier climate campaigns, what scientists and engineers are doing today and will explore models, prototypes and solutions that are already existent.

sara gottlieb
28
 

Isaac Chang 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to see how these artifacts relate to these time periods. How each one has made an impact on the 20s or the 30s.

Isaac Chang
10
 

Shapes

Exploring shapes with preschoolers

Alix Fitzpatrick
18
 

Photosynthesis

Please watch the video and take the quize right after it!

Sofia Estrada
1
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

IB Biology Pentadactly Limbs

Gretel von Bargen
136
1-24 of 422 Collections