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Found 363 Collections

 

Buoyancy

Betty Jo Moore
1
 

Grace Hopper & The First Computer Bug

A collection about Grace Hopper to use with teaching about historic and inspiring women figures in Computer Science. 

macbetthh
6
 

Biodiversity! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing biodiversity. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast. 

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
5
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
5
 

What is an ecosystem?

In this collection students will compare and contrast ecosystems in order to define them.

It can be used as part of a larger study on ecosystems and interconnections.

This collection contains images and videos depicting the biotic and abiotic elements of a desert and rainforest ecosystem. The accompanying note catcher links to an article on ecosystems from National Geographic and a TedTalk about the body as an ecosystem.


Guiding Questions: Students will construct responses to the following guiding questions as they work with this collection: 

GQ 1:  What is an ecosystem?

GQ 2: What makes a healthy ecosystem?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the guiding questions, they will understand that an ecosystem is made up of the living and non-living elements of work together to create a bubble of life. Students will learn that all of the elements of an ecosystem are interconnected and that a healthy ecosystem is diverse and well-balanced.


#learnwithTR


Elizabeth Weiss
24
 

Student Podcasting: Exploring the "Nature of Science" through Podcast Development [TEACHER TEMPLATE-- MAKE A COPY]

[DESCRIBE YOUR STUDENTS' PODCAST TOPIC HERE; INCLUDE ANY IMAGES, NOTES OR DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THEIR PROCESS. 

EXAMPLE (3-4 sentences): Sixth grade students conducted research about our community's access to clean drinking water, electricity, and roads over the past fifty years. Students identified subject matter experts, refined interview questions, conducted interviews and produced the episode included here. This collection includes the completed podcast episode, alongside text and images documenting the students' research and production process.]


This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection includes examples of student-created podcast epsidoes, in response to prompts from the Sidedoor for Educators collections. After listening to Sidedoor podcasts to set context, gain background knowledge from Smithsonian experts, and initiate a local dialogue on the topic, students engaged in community-based scientific research to explore and collect evidence about how this topic and the content within the episode is defined locally.

To find additional student podcast collections, search the Smithsonian Learning Lab for #YAGSidedoor2019.

Ashley Naranjo
4
 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Moon

This collection is about the moon, a little brother of the earth, reflecting the light from the sun and lighting up the night.

Mark Wang
4
 

The ART of AFRICAN TEXTILES

African textiles have long served as communicative notations and expressions of identity.  An extraordinary array of weaving and dyeing fashioned into textiles  transforms into works of art.  Embedded in various textiles are symbolic patterns of rank and status, color codes, and embroidered symbols.  New forms are being added by the current digital generation through the vast fabric of data, information, and rapid communication systems.  We see contemporary cloth printed with cellphones, computers, and other devices making modern visual statements! 

Deborah Stokes
23
 

Biodiversity Podcasting Resources

Resources for lessons on biodiversity, specifically for the YAG Podcasting project unit on biodiversity. 

Hazel Arroyo
4
 

Educational Open Course Resources

Open educational resources (OERs) are learning materials that can be modified and enhanced because their creators have given others permission to do so. The individuals or organizations that create OERs—which can include materials like presentation slides, lesson plans, lecture videos, and even entire textbooks. Some educators suggest that OERs might help reduce costs associated with producing and distributing course materials in both primary and secondary educational institutions. Teachers can download these materials—often at low costs—for use in their classrooms, but they can also update these materials and share their contributions with others, keeping content timely, relevant, and accurate. In this way, they needn't wait for textbook companies to issue entirely new editions of their (traditionally copyrighted) learning materials.

Sarah Daren
3
 

Environmental Advocacy through Art

This collection was designed to enable students to reflect deeply on their understanding of local and global human impacts on the planet and how they can inspire others to care about/collectively work to solve one of these issues.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various pieces of environmental art before they create their own visual call to action focused on the environmental issue that they care most about.

Global Competency Connection:

  • This project was designed to be the culminating project in a high school Environmental Science class, thus it is the expectation that students have “investigated the world” as they explored environmental and social issues throughout the course.  
  • This project will incorporate a level of choice as students “communicate their ideas” on the environmental issue that resonated most with them.
  • As a part of the project, students will share their campaigns with their teachers, peers, and families, and through this awareness raising thus “take action” on issues of global significance.

Using the Collection: A detailed description of daily activities can be found within the "Lesson Sequence" document. Additionally, notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection.  

#GoGlobal #ProjectZero #EnvironmentalScience

Aleah Myers
37
 

Area Architects--Quay Dorsey

This is an overview of an area and coding project 3rd grade students completed this year. 

Quay Dorsey
7
 

Journey through an Exploded Star: An Online Interactive

In this collection, students will explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space. They'll explore real data that provides evidence for the dispersal of several elements produced by the explosion of massive stars, specifically through the Cassiopeia A supernova. Then they’ll put their knowledge into practice by navigating the remains of the supernova in the online interactive “Journey through an Exploded Star.”

  1. The activity begins with “DISCOVER." The students will go through a series of slides, learning first how the visible spectrum of light is only a small part of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, about the different telescopes scientists use to view the electromagnetic radiation across that spectrum, and finally how they've used that data to form a composite view of our universe, specifically through a 3D model of the Cassiopeia A supernova.
  2. In the "EXPLORE" activity, students examine the 3D visualization of data, compiled by astrophysicist Tracey DeLaney, to understand how and why scientists study supernovas such as Cassiopeia A: to gain a comprehensive picture of the cosmos.
  3. The “PLAY” online interactive then takes the students on a first-person flight through the center of this exploded star. The interactive is split into two parts: The first part is a 2 minute guided fly-through, where Kim Arcand, project lead of the original 3D visualization found in the collection, explains the different forms of light and the elements that are traceable under those spectrums. The second is a free explore option, where students are able to manipulate the different spectrums by adjusting filters as they choose. Both parts of the interactive reinforce what they’ve previously learned within the collection about light across the EMS. This interactive works across browsers and requires no software downloads. Also included is a 360 video tour that works on mobile devices and Google Cardboard.
  4. Finally, three extension activities are included. The first allows students to take photographs using real MicroObservatory robotic telescopes located at Smithsonian Observatory sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Amado, Arizona to create their very own authentic astrophotographs. They’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. The second, "Recoloring the Universe," is a suite of resources that use astrophysical data to teach basic coding. The third resource, "How to Be a Scientist: Careers in Astronomy" highlights the career and data visualization work of astronomer Kimberly Arcand. 

This online activity could be used to augment study about the forms of radiation light can take, learning about supernovae and what happens after a star explodes, as well as learning about some of the different careers in science that are available (astrophysicists, astrophotographers, engineers, and visualization experts). As with all Learning Lab collections, it is built to be freely modified and adapted to fit your specific needs. 

Marce Rubio
22
 

George Catlin: Lives of the Plains Indians

Long before the camera went west, artists like George Catlin were preserving the images of the native Americans on the western plains. Catlin's paintings are numerous and divide into two genre: the group activities and portraiture. This learning lab focuses on group activities of many plains indians including hunting, traditional dances, and recreation. #cgmd19

Carmella Doty
32
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Carmella Doty
19
 

Aurora Borealis

The Northern Lights remind us how truly fabulous nature can be.
Debora Moore
10
 

Forgotten Elephants of Deep Time with Paleobiologist Advait Jakur

Program Details

  • May 17, 2019
  • Shows are 30 minutes long and stream at 11am and 2pm EDT
  • The program is free, but registration is requested. Sign Up

Did you know that there were many different species of elephants millions of years ago? Go back in time with Paleobiologist Advait Jukar to learn about the different kinds of elephants from the past, see real fossils, and understand how various factors — such as body size, tooth shape, and habitat — each played a role in the evolution of the elephant. Throughout the broadcast, Advait will take questions from your students via text chat and there will be opportunities for students to share what they think using live polls.

How to Participate

  • Bookmark this page! This is where the live event will happen on May 17, 2019, at 11am and then again at 2pm EDT.
  • During the live show, your students will be interacting with the scientist through a chat window on this page.
  • Download the Science How Tech Guide for instructions on preparing for and participating in a webcast. This guide includes recommended viewing guidelines if you’re participating with a group of students.

Viewing and Tech Guide for Science How Webcasts

  • Still have questions? Want to see your students featured on Science How? Email us at ScienceHow@si.edu.

Maggy Benson
51
 

Seeds and Seedlings

Intro to study of Plant Growth

John Fuller
12
 

Blacksmith Shop

Come along and explore the Blacksmith Shop at La Purisima Mission.  Are you ready?  Let's go! 

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
12
 

Plesiosaurs and other Large Marine Reptiles

Explore this complementary collection of materials for the Smithsonian Science How webcast, Plesiosaurs and other Large Marine Reptiles with Paleobiologist Dr. Laura Soul. 


Travel back in time with Paleobiologist Laura Soul to learn about the giant marine reptiles that once ruled the sea, like plesiosaurs. Laura will introduce your students to several related groups of marine reptiles, like pliosaurs and elasmosaurs, exploring their unique features and adaptations for living in marine environments. Laura will also share some of her while research and discoveries about how the body shapes and sizes of these marine reptiles changed over time. Throughout the broadcast, Laura will take questions from your students via text chat and there will be opportunities for students to share what they think using live polls. Join here on April 11 at 11am and 2pm ET: 

https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/plesiosaurs-and-other-large-marine-reptiles-paleobiologist-laura-soul

Maggy Benson
20
 

Culture and Aesthetics Meet Physics: Why Soviet and American Spacesuits Look Different

This collection serves as a preview for the fifth of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”

National Air and Space Museum curator Cathleen Lewis will discuss objects from the Space Race gallery, in particular how spacesuits from the USSR and the United States indicate differing cultural and aesthetic answers to similar engineering challenges. 

Resources included in this collection have been recommended by the presenter for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
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