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Found 480 Collections

 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Zozobra in Santa Fe: A Contemporary Reckoning of a Local Tradition

This teaching collection encourages students to think about all sides of an issue - in this case a cultural event - and then make connections to related issues of identity and nationalism locally, nationally, and internationally. The collection uses an article by Eduardo Díaz, director of the Smithsonian Latino Center, and Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, as a jumping off point to explore changes to Santa Fe's annual Fiesta de Santa Fe, described by organizers as “the oldest, most colorful community celebration in the nation,” as part of an ongoing conversation across the country about how we choose to honor our "history, multicultural legacies and unique blend of traditions."

The exercise is scaffolded with global competence strategies to help students explore the Fiesta in successive detail, consider the various perspectives of the communities involved, and make connections to similar conversations happening across the US today. Students can share ideas in groups or through writing assignments, adding in outside research  if desired. 

Keywords: American Indian, Native American, Pueblo Indians, Hispanic, Latino, Entrada

#LatinoHAC


Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Zora Neale Hurston: Author, Anthropologist and Folklore Researcher

This teaching collection includes introductory resources to begin a study of Zora Neale Hurston, as an author, anthropologist and folklore researcher during the Harlem Renaissance.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Kate Harris
14
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Lisa Major
32
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Edward Elbel
30
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Adam Baer
20
 

Writing with Imagery to Create Mood: The Lost Balloon

This lesson plan was developed for 7th grade Language Arts as a workshop for students who are writing and revising a personal narrative. The lesson creates an opportunity to see with a piece of artwork how visual details create mood. 

Katie Cahill
2
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Kathy Powers
66
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Susan Stokley
66
 

World War One Propaganda

This is a trial collection for Windsor High School Modern History class.

Linda Mooney
3
 

World War II Propaganda

These pictures will be used to introduce a brief history of World War II before exploring communism with the novel Animal Farm. Students can either do one of the visual thinking strategies See / Think / Wonder or a Perceive / Know / Care About using the piece We Can Do It. The class can then proceed into the background overview of World War II.

As students read Animal Farm and study techniques of propaganda, students can then explore the other posters listed in this learning lab. They can first do the sorting activity to differentiate between the Soviet and American posters followed by the discussion about whether the posters more alike or more similar to each other. Connections to the novel can be made throughout this lesson.

This lesson can also be extended by doing a See / Think / Wonder Activity with the photos of the Soviet Propaganda chess set.  Also the Chinese Cultural Revolution posters make a great connection if continuing your study with non-fiction memoir such as Red Scarf Girl by Ji-li Jiang. 



Yolanda Toni
19
 

World War II on the Home Front: Civic Responsibility

Lesson based on posters that encouraged American citizens to contribute to the war effort. Students consider the importance of volunteerism in a free society.
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
 

Women's Suffrage

The Woman's Suffrage movement in America began in 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in an effort to allow women the right to vote.
Linda Muller
20
 

Women's Suffrage

The Woman's Suffrage movement in America began in 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in an effort to enfranchise women.
Jason Smith
30
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

Issues of gender inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining this issue with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. The collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service? In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

National Postal Museum
31
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

This collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th century represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service. In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

Jessica Rosenberry
28
 

Winter Scenes

These pictures are to be used as a writing catalyst for writing club. Pick one to do a See / Think / Wonder as a whole group. Then students can complete their own individual ones. These pieces offer a variety of interpretations about the season of winter which may serve as an inspiration to write winter poetry.

Suggestion: You may also play an excerpt of Vivaldi's Four Seasons during this activity.

Yolanda Toni
42
 

William Faulkner: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of William Faulkner, an American author and Nobel Prize laureate. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as the caricature, stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his stories, does the portrait capture your image of William Faulkner? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of William Faulkner, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, the sound and the fury, writer

Tess Porter
6
 

Wild Children

Katie Cahill
2
 

Who is to blame for WWI?

Who is to blame for WWI? Is it Gavrilo Princip, for assassinating the archduke? Surely that’s much too simple? We like to identify “good guys” and “bad guys,” but is there danger is that? The reparations laid on Germany in the Treaty of Versailles, most historians agree, contributed to WWII... Can any one person, group of people, country, truly take the blame for such a crisis? Should they? Who should have stopped it? #Teaching Inquiry

Melissa Kozlowski Ziobro
16
 

When American Bureaucracy Fails; Voices of Dissent (Protest Artists)

America has many great moments fraught with many historical misses.  In other words, for every great feat in American history, there are equal moments of trouble and shame in her behavior.  The failure of America is often human failures, tragic moments where our government failed to act or stand up (i.e., Hurricane Katrina).  Or, it could be duplicitous in egregious behaviors (i.e., Dred Scott Decision, Plessy vs. Ferguson, chattel slavery).  But, historical textbooks do not traditionally frame this dual narrative.  Instead, students tend to get the laudable narrative of bravery, prowess, ingenuity, and individualism.  Or, textbooks gloss over deeply problematic issues that actually resurface in contemporary society today.  But, works of art can always provide the pointed narrative that textbooks attempt to dismiss.  Dissenters have a place in the canon as well, and it is vital for educators to bring them in the fold in teaching American history and literature.

This unit is for teachers!  These works have been curated for their social protest against American bureaucracy, especially in its moments of failure.  It is important for teachers to fully read and study text BEFORE sharing with students.  Please check the "temperature" of your audience!

Angelann Stephens
15
 

What makes you say that?: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial by Ashley Naranjo

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine for interpretation with justification. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. The strategy is paired with photographs and an artwork from the National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Using guided questions, students will look at a single event through multiple media formats.

Tags: William H. Johnson, Robert Scurlock, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial
Susan Stokley
4
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