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Found 721 Collections

 

Rock Music & Its Influence on Identity

This collection puts together different resources that portray the impact rock music had on society. Rock music influenced the lives of the youth through lyrics, image, and performance. This teen-oriented music was written about women, sex, and social reform. The influence from artists and their songs caused the youth to change not only their values, morals, or what was sexually appropriate, but also even their style. The phrase "sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll" didn't come from nothing. #MUS109-2019

Michaela Peck
6
 

Rap in the Context of Music and Identity

This collection will examine a brief history of rap what role identity plays in the music. In the context of this project identity means gender, race, culture, and upbringing. The theme within American popular music I have explored is music and identity. This collection contains images and audio clips to help convey my findings. I recommend a high school audience or older for viewing this collection.

 #MUS109-2019

Katherine Crawford
27
 

impressionism

impressionism paintings

jackie li
8
 

The ART of AFRICAN TEXTILES

Deborah Stokes
23
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
67
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The Visual arts can be  an entry point to literacy in the classroom.   Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid  students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.    Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and  critical thinkers!  

Deborah Stokes
88
 

Virginia History Tour

From Jamestown to the present, explore some of the people, places and events that tell the story of the history of Virginia. 

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Nancy Butler
56
 

Paths to Perspective: How the Past Connects to Our Present

This lesson is inspired by Out of Eden Learn, the journey of Paul Salopek, and the idea that each person is an amalgamation of the people and events that came before them. These people and events include the nature of their birth, the lives of their parents, the experiences of their grandparents, the creation of the printing press, etc. The idea behind this lesson is, in its inception, to expose students to milestones in black history, and to use that rich history to challenge them to look into their past to see how they connect to larger events that came before them last week or even a century or millennia ago.

This lesson is especially crafted for Black History Month (though of course it can be used at other times) to have students from multiple ethnic backgrounds try to find a connection to the African American Experience in the United States. It removes students from an ethnic vacuum and asks them to see how the journey of others not like them has an impact on their, their family's and their country's history.

To begin your use of this collection please read the lesson plan at the beginning labeled Lesson Plan: Paths To Perspective. It is the full lesson for using this Learning Lab collection. You may use it in full or alter as you see fit for the needs of your class. It is by no means exhaustive, especially in terms of Project Zero ideas that can be used with the collection, but it is a good starting point for how to use this material in class.

#GoGlobal

Sean Felix
23
 

Basque Music and Dance

Explore the sounds and movements of the Basque Culture.
BasqueMuseumBoise
4
 

Exploring Food in Basque Culture

Get hungry while you explore the unique and delicious traditions of the Basque people through food. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
3
 

Library of Congress artworks

I have given numerous presentations on countless artworks in the Library of Congress's Thomas Jefferson Building.  These images show some of the artworks I have discussed. 

Lynda Cooper
40
 

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos shares the compelling story of legendary activist and leader Dolores Huerta (b. 1930) and the farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. It is a quintessentially American tale of struggle and sacrifice, of courage and victory.

As a complement to the exhibition, these educational resources explore Huerta's public life as an activist and co-founder of the United Farm Workers  (UFW) and what led her to become a Latina civil rights icon. In her life as a communicator, organizer, lobbyist, contract negotiator, teacher and mother,  Huerta's unparalleled leadership skills helped dramatically improve the lives of farm workers.

Users will broaden their understanding of the farm workers movement through a careful look at Dolores Huerta's significant - but often under-acknowledged - contributions. The exhibition and educational resources also explore how workers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds came together to empower the movement and how the arts played an essential role. In addition, users will come to understand Huerta's far-reaching impact and important legacy.


Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
39
 

8th Grade Spanish Literacy: Mi Comunidad

This collection is for an 8th grade Spanish Literacy unit on community, but it can be used for any secondary ed unit on a topic related to community. The essential questions that guide student learning are: What is a community? How am I shaped by my community? There are 5 instructional activities attached to this collection that can be used to explore the concept of community and help students generate understandings in response to the essential questions. These lessons include activities related to project-based learning, oral presentation, experiential learning through field trips, viewing artworks using thinking routines, and writing poetry.  The images included in the collection serve as options that pair well with the thinking routines or any other activities that teachers might like to use to explore this topic with their students. #GoGlobal


Maria Fernanda Garcia
50
 

Puerto Rico Movie Posters

Movie Posters from Puerto Rico

Introduction to feature film’s narrative stories

Arch of the story – Beginning, middle, & end  

Introduction to the Lesson Plan  

Constant scrolling through social media platforms and click bait headlines, many of us uncritically consume vast amount of visual media every day. This lesson plan asks student participants to make observations of visual media and to transform those impressions through the creative medium of cinematography. The goal of the lesson plan is to help develop a more nuanced, informed visual literacy among young learners.   

The use of visual impressions in this lesson plan allows the student to construct cinematic narrative stories based on Puerto Rican culture and daily life. The images printed on these posters relate to themes that explored art and exhibitions, medical education and prevention of diseases, natural disaster awareness and relief actions, community engagement in medical campaigns, as well as rural life in Puerto Rico. In order to write this narrative story, the student will interact heavily with the poster visuals and the stories they represent in order to awaken the student’s imagination and intellect as they engage in an exercise of writing fiction, allowing them to learn about Puerto Rican culture and cinematic history.  

Lesson Goals

-Exposure to film archival material

-Development of writing skills for film narratives

-Analyses and comprehension of the screenwriting process and structure

-Exposure to Puerto Rican culture and daily life activities

-Teamwork and ability to multitask  

Concluding Questions to Students

  • What did you know about Puerto Rico and its culture before the lesson plan, and what are new things that you learned about it after engaging in this exercise?
  • What visuals impacted you the most and why?
  • After completing step # 3, how did you initially envision the characters of your story to be or to behave?
  • Do you feel confident about using the beginning-middle-end structure to write a screenplay?
  • What are a few things that you can take from this exercise and how do you see implementing them in future–artistic, cinematic, writing–projects?  

The following seven images are screen printings of movie posters from Puerto Rico. These screen-prints are housed at the Archives Center at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.  

The purpose of this lesson plan is to help you create a narrative story (aided by the poster’s images and scenarios) following a movie scrip sequence of “beginning, middle, and an end.” Then compare your story with others in your classroom and see how close or far were you from the stories–of the films–these posters represent.  

Here are the steps you need to follow:  

  • Choose 3 (out of the 7) posters.
  • Once you have selected your posters, assign them a place in your narrative story as follow;
    • Poster # 1 - Beginning
    • Poster # 2 - Middle
    • Poster # 3 - End
  • Look at the characters, the setting (place and/or type of surroundings), objects, symbols, and the text on your posters (we will provide attendees with Spanish to English translation for this lesson plan).
  • Give Names to the characters in the posters. Names can repeat if you want a character in one poster to be the same character in another poster (this might be helpful to write your narrative story). Or! each character in a poster can be unique and have its own story.
  • Go to the lesson plan images and read the description and keywords for each of your 3 choices.
  • Combine your text from step # 4 and incorporate it into your narrative (in your own words) with your observations from step # 5
  • Arrange your narrative, shuffle the order of your posters (beginning, middle, end), move characters around, change names, etc. Have fun.

You will have the option of shuffling the order of your posters at any time in order to re-arrange your narrative.            

Your narrative does not have to be perfect or make any sense. The purpose of this lesson plan is to put you in the mindset of the writer and director of a feature film. Using as inspiration movies made in Puerto Rico as you analyze the meaning and stories behind the posters you chose in order to make your own Puerto Rican movie. 

This lesson plan was an assignment completed as part of University of California, Berkeley Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program with PhD candidate, Amanda Guzman.


Raul Varela
7
 

Native American Children in Art

Elementary Classroom Collection 

See - Think - Wonder

Debbie Hagan
17
 

International Sweethearts of Rhythm

Images of the world’s first integrated all-female big band, comprised primarily of African American and mixed-race women in their teens and early 20s. More at https://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2010/04/sweethearts-of-rhythm.html

Maggie Crawford
12
 

Environmental Advocacy through Art

This collection was designed to enable students to reflect deeply on their understanding of local and global human impacts on the planet and how they can inspire others to care about/collectively work to solve one of these issues.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various pieces of environmental art before they create their own visual call to action focused on the environmental issue that they care most about.

Global Competency Connection:

  • This project was designed to be the culminating project in a high school Environmental Science class, thus it is the expectation that students have “investigated the world” as they explored environmental and social issues throughout the course.  
  • This project will incorporate a level of choice as students “communicate their ideas” on the environmental issue that resonated most with them.
  • As a part of the project, students will share their campaigns with their teachers, peers, and families, and through this awareness raising thus “take action” on issues of global significance.

#GoGlobal #ProjectZero #EnvironmentalScience

Aleah Myers
37
 

ORIENTATION | Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

<<This information is relevant to the Fall 2018 - Spring 2019 SSYAC Program.>>

SUPER IMPORTANT: When you click into the tiles, be sure to notice in the upper left hand corner if there is a "paper clip" icon. Clicking on the paperclip icon will lead to more information on a side panel. Some of the tiles will be website links or video links. Tiles marked as PDF or DOC are downloadable information. Within a tile, arrows at the bottom of the screen will navigate you between tiles.


Orientation for new members of the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) for Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

  • About the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) -- including forms and other important information
  • About Secretary David J. Skorton
  • About Smithsonian's past and present
  • About Smithsonian Affiliate participants
  • About Smithsonian operations, and policy information helpful to SSYAC members. 
  • Meeting Resources (relevant info related to upcoming meetings will be added closer to meeting dates). 

KEYWORDS: teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
32
 

Harlem Renaissance Art and Music

This collection was developed for a unit based upon the Harlem Renaissance and the art movement incorporating the style of visual artist Romare Bearden for students PreK thru 6th grade.  Students were exposed to different musical artists such as Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington to make the connections between Bearden's art work and their musical abilities.  This group of artifacts was beneficial for students to be exposed to people, art work, and history that they may not have been exposed to before.  Using the thinking routines such as 'See, Think, Wonder' was a great way for students to dive deeper into images, not just art work but even images of people and the differences in time periods.

#pzpgh

Rebecca Grubbs
15
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme "The Search for an American Identity"

This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. 

Included here: 

  • Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. 
  • Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  
  • Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.
  • Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.

This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," - the subject of the Montgomery College - Smithsonian 2019 Fellowship program. 


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
29
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

mike mickelson
26
 

Indian Education Media Arts Integration

Collection of Native American Ledger Art and drawings on hides. 

Would be used with other resources on modern Ledger Art being created today, as well as the history of ledger art and hide paintings in Plains Indian cultures. 

Kendall Griggs
11
 

AIM and BPP

The following collection acts as a supplemental resource for the Power of the People: Intersectionality of the American Indian Movement and the Black Panther Party 12th grade lesson plan. 

Kenlontae' Turner
65
 

Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.

This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at https://www.ccsso.org/

Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:

  • What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?
  • How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?
  • How do we define global competence and globally competent students?

#NTOY18

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass 

Freer|Sackler Education
22
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