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Found 1,508 Collections

 

Sami Ryan - 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This project is to demonstrate my knowledge of the 1920s and 1930s using artifacts and to highlight how the times shaped the most important ideals and American values within these decades.

sami ryan
10
 

Meaningful objects

Can objects have meaning? What is symbolically meaningful in your life?  Through photography and text, use aesthetic choices to make your meaning visually strong. 

The first image is from the Smithsonian collection. The other images are from students at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, NY.

louise brady
9
 

Can art be used for social or political commentary?

What are contemporary issues in our world? What is your personal viewpoint on a contemporary issue? Can art be used as an agent of change?

louise brady
28
 

The great depression

Mabi Aleman
1
 

The Soul's Expression: Identity, Individuality, & the Spirit in Visual Art

Art provides a pathway for individuals to express their inner self while also capturing the outer—this great wide world so intricate it's difficult to define.  Throughout history, humans have sought to  comprehend both their environment and their own inherent cultural uniqueness. This search has become symbolized in their artistic accomplishments and aesthetic heritage. Whether through representations of specific individuals and the human figure or awe-inspiring works of architecture, these art pieces are a window into the creative core of our past. 

In this collection, we will observe the ways in which the soul/spirit has been expressed in art, and how human creativity sheds light upon both individual and cultural identities and its varied interpretations throughout the ages. This collection is organized in three symbolic steps on a stone staircase entitled "The Stone Path of Eternity." To truly travel through each piece, I have included an image, a brief description of the work under information, and then, signified by the yellow (1) above, I've provided my own analysis and interpretation of the piece in its relationship to the collection theme. 

Through lingering through the "Stone Path of Eternity," which is represented by the first two tiles, we will from one stone to the next in seeking the many ways in which the soul's expression can be defined. 

In Stone Number One, "The Spirit's Encased Construct," we'll see how architecture and large-scale artistic projects merge to reflect both cultural identity and the individuality of their leaders through works from ancient Babylonia, Egypt, the Byzantine Empire and beyond. 

Shifting step to Stone Number Two, "Human Identity Immortalized in Matter," we delve into the ways in which the human figure is represented and what these images can share with us in terms of the varying levels, purposes, intentions behind the artist's created expressions of the Spirit on Earth. This idea is exemplified in creations ranging from the Paleolithic period to Egypt and Ancient Greece, along with the Italian Renaissance. 

Finally, in Stone Number Three,"Individuals and Spirituality Entwine," we step into the door of the spirit directly, traveling through the many methods which cultures apply in trying to simultaneously convey and understand what realms are in union with and beyond this life.  Some cultures who address this idea in their artistic tradition are seen in instances of Egyptian art and work from ancient and Hellenistic Greece, as well as both the Italian Renaissance and Northern European Renaissance.  

 The intended audience for this collection is just as ambiguous as my subject matter. Those who might be drawn to this collection are people attracted to the enigmas of life and death, who have questioned their place in society and the mysteries this world has to hold, and are curious to know more about how, historically, cultures have related to these probing questions—for, as you will see, they certainly have existed as long as humans have walked the earth. No matter if you're in high school, college, or beyond formal education, I hope you will find my musings on these artworks and their meanings compelling and thought-provoking. 

Renowned artist and poet William Blake once wrote, "To see the world in a grain of sand, and to see heaven in a wild flower, hold infinity in the palm of your hands, and eternity in an hour."   From the most abstract art to the remarkably realistic, there is always an image of ourselves, in the an esoteric sense, waiting to be found within.  With its timeless method, Art seeks to create a definition for this all-encompassing and ever-evading essence and I hope to continue that quest with you as we explore this collection. #AHMC2019

Emma Geller
22
 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Virtual Tour

Take a virtual tour of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on-site art installations.

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
5
 

Uprooted Dreams

Uprooted Dreams (Alebrijes)

On permanent display in the Education Area upstairs at the ESB-MACC is Uprooted Dreams (2012), a site-specific sculptural installation that features over 19 individual, brightly colored woodcarvings, mounted in the public entrance of the Education Area. Artist Margarita Cabrera was selected to create an artwork which would engage the community in its production. "Uprooted Dreams is a work of art designed in the form of workshop production...nineteen members of Austin's immigrant community- guided by Master Artesanos, Ranulfo Sergio Ibañes and Lucia Luria Sosa, experts in the Mexican craft tradition of alebrije-created, carved and painted wooden sculptures. These pieces embodied artistic themes of uprootedness as they spoke to the transformation of people, land, and community. For the artist, artesanos, participants, and audience, the process and product of Uprooted Dreams provides an ongoing platform on which to build respect, equality, solidarity, and dignified ways of making art and creating community.   - Margarita Cabrera

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
4
 

Our Story (Carver Museum, Cultural and Genealogy Center History)

Our history begins in the modest building that housed Austin’s first library. Built in 1926, this small, wood-framed structure was soon overwhelmed by the demands of its patrons. During this time, the citizens of East Austin, along with the American Association of University Women, began to petition the city about the need for a library in their community. As a result, when a larger central library facility was built in 1933, the original building was moved to its current location on Angelina Street and later resurfaced in brick veneer.

In its early years, the Angelina Street library was simply known as the “Colored Branch”. In 1947, however, it was christened the George Washington Carver Branch Library in honor of the inventor and scientist who brought so much pride to African-Americans. For decades, the Carver Library served the Central-East Austin community, and its patronage and book collection grew steadily.

As patrons increased and space became limited, the need for a larger Carver Branch Library became apparent. Through the efforts of the Central-East Austin Citizens for a New Carver Branch, this issue continued to have a voice. In 1979 a new facility was completed directly adjacent to the original Carver Library.

 

As for the original building – the community imagined a museum and community center that would promote African-American history and achievement in Austin, Travis County, and beyond. On October 24, 1980, their vision became a reality. What was once Austin’s first library, and then later became Austin’s first branch library, opened its doors as the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center, the first African-American neighborhood museum in of Texas.

In a 1998 bond election, the citizens of Austin voted to further expand both the Carver Museum & Cultural Center and the Carver Branch Library. Today, the museum is housed in a 36,000 square-foot facility that includes four galleries, a conference room, classroom, darkroom, dance studio, 134-seat theatre, and archival space. The galleries feature a core exhibit on Juneteenth, a permanent exhibit on Austin African-American families, an Artists’ Gallery, and a children’s exhibit on African-American scientists and inventors.

The historic building now houses the genealogy center. The museum, cultural and genealogy center is owned and operated by the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Division of Museums and Cultural Programs.

#ethnicstudies #africanamericanhistory #georgewashingtoncarver #austintxhistory

carvermuseumatx
4
 

Digital Museum Resources for the High School Ethnic Studies Classroom (Irving Arts Center )

This collection includes digital museum resources and replicable activities that will serve as a springboard for discussion during the Exploration of Ethnic Studies workshop at the Irving Arts Center on October 16, 2019. The collection models how digital museum resources can be leveraged to support critical thinking and deeper learning for high school Ethnic Studies curricula. The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. 

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

#EthnicStudies

Keywords: Ethnic Studies, Mexican American Studies, MAS

Philippa Rappoport
43
 

Facing Genocide: The US Response to the Holocaust

My aunt remembers sitting at the kitchen table as a child while her parents, my grandparents, read the Yiddish newspaper, Der Tag. Often one would start crying, saying, nishta ("gone"), "this one nishta; that one nishta," in response to the paper's lists of towns in Europe overrun by the Nazis. 

This collection examines the US response to the Holocaust, pairing historical documentation with four thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Unveiling Stories," :Think, Feel, Care," "The 3 Y's," and "Circles of Action," - to prompt students to ask important questions about our individual and collective responsibility to humanity. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the National Museum of American History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), including USHMM's online exhibition, Americans and the Holocaust, which examines "the motives, pressures, and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war, and genocide." Examined with thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials, students will explore complex and deeply troubling issues that continue to have relevance today. 

This collection complements chapter 14 ("World War II and America's Ethnic Problem") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Bracero": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Pioneers from the East: The Sing Family

This collection is comprised of archival content from the Austin History Center and KLRU's Austin Revealed: Pioneers from the East project. This collection features the Sing family, one of three of the first Chinese families in Austin. It explores topics of citizenship, migration, immigration, naturalization, interracial marriage, preserving history, and Asian American history.

#TCSAARC 

#EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
26
 

Asian Americans with Disabilities in America

This collection was created by Mark Ferrer, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. "My name is Mark Ferrer. I was the first deaf intern at APAC. I practically researched issues that I thought might help people with disabilities like me. I was resourceful and used the opportunities to create awareness for Asians with disabilities. I entitled my research as Asian Americans with Disabilities in America."


About the Asian Americans with Disabilities in America, Asian is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the U.S. and the growth rate of Asians with disabilities progressively swelling (worsening). They were being categorized and called the handicapped, the disabled and the feeble-minded. The language barriers, not enough support, being the model minority and confusion between two cultures were only a few of the many challenges they faced. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries that they suffer from discrimination but became beneficiaries when ADA was passed in 1990. It is truly remarkable that this collection will give you information and awareness about the status of the Asians and disabled in America.

Mark Ferrer
20
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
 

Breaking Barriers: Race, Gender, and the U.S. Military

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how individuals overcame barriers during and following their service in the U.S. military. Resources address how issues of race and gender operated as barriers to equal treatment for all those who serve in the U.S. military, as well as circumstances endured by veterans following the end of major wars. The experiences of members of the armed forces during the American Revolution, U.S. Civil War, WWI, and WWII are highlighted; however, other wars and perspectives should be considered when exploring these resources. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: military, soldiers, women, African American, Tuskegee, Airmen, Airwomen, war, World War One, World War I, World War Two, World War II, Red Jacket, Tayadaneega, Joseph Brant, Native Americans, American Indians, Horace Pippin, Theodore Milton Sullivan, J.W. Lucus, Buffalo Soldier, Charles Young, Carter Woodson, Willa Beatrice Brown, Bessie Coleman, Airforce, pilots, Jacqueline Cochran, Janet Harmon Bragg, Cornelia Fort, Nancy Love, WASPs, twentieth century, 20th #NHD

EDSITEment
90
 

From Medieval to Modernism: The Impact of Classical Art & Architecture

This collection is intended to further educate viewers on the architecture and art in the Classical period using multiple resources as well as the Robert & DiYanni text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

Throughout this collection readers will get a glimpse of the start of Classical architecture and how it came to be, how art lined the walls of these buildings and how art through architecture was developed. With that, readers will be able to engage and visualize today's architectural structures and how that culture influences today compared to those between the Medieval times to Modernism. They will also have the ability to recognize the true and inner beauty that lies in this architecture, amidst the chaos that regularly occurred there on a day to day basis. The truth will always remain beautiful even when it doesn't seem that way.

This collection is available for those wanting to see the beginnings of the classical art and it's influences from the medieval times up until modernism and will provide a better visual understanding that before the beauty of what architecture is today, there was once beauty at the start of it all and that remains throughout the years, just presented in different forms. 


#AHMCFall2019

Candi Tate
12
 

Mexican American Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of Latino families. #ethnicstudies

Lanette Aguero
20
 

Latino Immigration to US #ethnicstudies

Images that tell a story on Latino Immigration to the USA. #ethnicstudies

Lynda Harkins
14
 

Hoop of Life with Ty Defoe

With his vivid presence as a performer, Ty Defoe recounts an eloquent story of life though movement, music, and words rooted in his Oneida and Ojibwe heritage. He uses the sacred Hoop Dance to explore Native American stories framed by traditional and contemporary culture, history, and values. As the colorful interlinked hoops move, they speak of the unity and interdependence of all living things—and offer lessons for our everyday lives. Presented by Discovery Theater--a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. 

Discovery Theater
39
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

America & Athletics

Christina Ratatori
13
 

Influential Architecture: A Comparison of Past & Present

This collection is meant to introduce the viewer to world architecture of the past & present day using Rebold & DiYanni's text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

One of my hobbies is traveling, and when I do travel, one aspect that I pay attention to is the architecture of the place I'm in. As I was studying architecture for this class, I realized that buildings even in my home state of Ohio had beautiful Roman influences, although they were built two millennia later.

This project will focus on world architecture, its history and innovations, as well as comparisons to the influences we see on buildings going up all around our world today. It should be noted that the artistic comparisons in this collection are of my own observation alone and any influence the modern architects may have had may have been intentional or simply coincidental.

I hope you enjoy this collection.

Resource: Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities by Janetta Rebold Benton & Robert DiYanni. 

 #AHMCFALL2019


Rachel Marshall
14
 

Comparing Modern Contemporary Artists

This collection dives into the comparison of modern and contemporary artists who were inspired by the ancient arts (prehistoric, ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, etc.) and builds upon the meaning of art and transformation of the different styles. What do these artists have in common? How were they inspired by the ancients?

#AHMCFall2019

Ashley Goerke
18
 

Test 2

a test 

Miguel Mascorro
1
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