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Found 375 Collections

 

Apollo 13

Collection created to supplement the Red Clover Award book Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13.
Carrie Speranza
13
 

science in art

Robin McLaurin
6
 

Mission Water System

Come along as we explore the science behind how water filtered, used and brought to the residents at La Purisima Mission!

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
17
 

Blacksmith Shop

Come along and explore the Blacksmith Shop at La Purisima Mission.  Are you ready?  Let's go! 

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
13
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

Claims, Support and Reasoning

Introduction to the science concept of claims, support and reasoning.

Jamie Weber
10
 

Spacesuits: Working Under Pressure

A collection of articles, images and videos about the function and necessary components of a spacesuit.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
19
 

science in art

Chris Crocker
6
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Adding the A to STEM: Integrating Portraiture into STEAM/STEM Subjects

This Learning Lab demonstrates how portraiture can be used as an interdisciplinary springboard for lessons in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Portraits of STEM pertinent sitters provide a jumping-in point for students, visually grounding them in a subject. In this way, portraiture functions as an interdisciplinary tool to engage students and enrich their learning across curriculum. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
308
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Spark!Lab Invention Steps with Shopping Carts

Explore Spark!Lab's invention steps through the process of a real inventor, Orla Watson, who changed grocery shopping for millions of people with his telescoping shopping cart. Then make your own cart with our final invention challenge! Click through each of the items below and be sure to read the information (i) sections

Objectives:

  • Understand the invention process by examining one specific invention 
  • Discover and critically analyze objects and primary sources from the National Museum of American History's archives and collection

The Draper Spark!Lab is a hands-on invention activity center housed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. 

Marie-Louise Orsini
22
 

NATURE: Who Lives in the Trees?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
20
 

NATURE: A Visit to the Museum

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
29
 

Looking at the Moon

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


Talk With Me Toolkit
19
 

AIR & SPACE: Can it Fly?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

AIR AND SPACE: Air Moves!

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

AIR & SPACE: A Visit to the Museum

Museums are great places for seeing and experiencing new things. Your young scientist will love taking a trip to visit an air and space museum, astronomy museum, or planetarium. 

Your child may be excited to see airplanes, rockets, astronaut gear, or learn about our solar system. There are lots of opportunities to talk and have fun together. This collection provides strategies and activities for adult caregivers visiting the museum with a child.

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
24
 

The Corona's Cooling Power

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its construction using renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. To minimize energy use, the architects and engineers designed the building to allow lots of natural light inside of the museum. The Corona, the ornamental bronze-colored metal lattice that covers the museum like a crown covers a head, helps to keep the museum cool by allowing some sunlight inside, but by blocking the rest. As a result, the museum uses less electricity for lights and air conditioning. 

But how does it work? Have your students complete the following experiment to find out!

NMAAHC Education
15
 

Exploring Solar Power at NMAAHC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its use of renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. One of the ways NMAAHC is using renewable energy is through the use of solar panels on its roof. Although the solar panels are not visible to our visitors, they produce enough energy to power 11 average-sized U.S. homes for a year.

Use this activity to engage your students in a lesson covering solar power, electricity, and the factors that affect its production. 

Keywords: solar, power, STEM, science, LEED, environment, energy, NMAAHC, African American, National Mall

NMAAHC Education
18
 

Water, Art and Greek Mythology: Achelous and Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules", a supplemental picture guide to the story, a non-fiction article about fresh water from Readworks, and a supplemental worksheet.


Tags: greece, #SAAMTeach , water

Taylor Hummell
6
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
1-24 of 375 Collections