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Found 543 Collections

 

Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth.

In an upcoming exhibition, titled Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth., African American changemakers will be highlighted to illustrate their outstanding legacy and contributions. These individuals are icons often rendered invisible by a country, yet uplifted by a major culture. The following images showcase the legacy of men and women featured in the exhibition, illuminating their greatest works, interactions with the community, and so forth. Ever individual, whether featured in the exhibit or Learning Lab, affirm the power of the African American journey and, ultimately, the American experience. 

As you navigate throughout this Learning Lab, take notice of the various sections the Men of Change are divided into; such as Storytellers, Myth-breakers, Fathering, Community, Imagining, Catalysts and Loving.

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
69
 

Design with Empathy: Michael Graves Case Study

This collection is designed to explore the essential question: How do designers understand and experience the needs and wants of stakeholders? 

It looks into the design with empathy approach used by Michael Graves to design and test the Prime TC wheelchair for use in a hospital environment.  

Objectives:

  • Examine methods for developing empathy for your stakeholders  
  • Gain familiarity with the design process 
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 

Unpacking Questions: 

  • What kind of things did the designers research?
  • What methods did they use to research and document primary data? 
  • Who worked with the designers on this project? What value did this add to the project perspective?
  • Which stakeholders did the design specifically accommodate? 
  • How were stakeholder needs prioritised?
  • What were the main issues the designer was trying to combat? 
  • List the steps of the design process evident in the case study.


Jasmine Kassulke
22
 

Volcanoes

Explore volcanic eruptions and their effect on rock formations through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: plate tectonics, seismic activity, geologist


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Forensic Anthropology: What Bones Reveal

Explore what human bones reveal about the past through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.


Keywords: anthropology, archeology, archaeology, carbon dating, chemistry, data, heredity, evolution, carbon 14

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
46
 

Bees

Explore bees' behavior and their role in pollination through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: animal, insect, plant adaptation, animal communication, flowers, pollen, honey, hive, engineering, entomologist, pollinator, colony, system


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
61
 

Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Explore coral reefs and climate change through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Ruth Law: Breaking Barriers in Aviation and the War Effort

This topical collection of resources and analysis strategies can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day (#NHD) 2020 theme of "Breaking Barriers in History". This collection focuses on primary and secondary sources around the accomplishments and contributions of aviator, Ruth Law. 

#BecauseOfHerStory #NHD2020

Tags: Ruth Bancroft Law Oliver, aviator, aviation, world records, flight, military, World War I, women's history

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

“Futurescapes. Storytelling and Video-Making Workshop: Using Digital Museums Resources to Imagine Our City in 2050”

This Learning Lab collection was made to guide participants  during the Digital Storytelling workshop “Futurescapes. Storytelling and Video-Making Workshop: Using Digital Museums Resources to Imagine Our City in 2050””, a two-day event organised by the Storytelling Research Team at Loughborough University, UK, and hosted in the London campus at Here East on the 6th and the 7th of August as part of the East Education Summer School at Here East in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

During the workshop, designed and facilitated by Dr Antonia Liguori, museums objects will be used to trigger stories about a day in East London in 2050.

Participants will 

  • learn how to use the cloud-based video-editing software WeVideo to make their own digital story;
  • explore the variety of museums digital resources available online;
  • experiment with storyboarding techniques for creative writing;
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file;
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video;
  • reflect on the 5-step Digital Storytelling process;
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art.

Digital stories work best when there are rewards for both the storyteller and the viewer. Stories are always told from the perspective of the storyteller and for maximum benefit, it is vital to carefully choose the right story to tell.  All necessary information will be given during the workshop, but to maximise opportunities, participants need to bring with them an object or a photo that connects them to the place where they live now and/or to their idea about how this place could change in the future.

This workshop is also the final event of the EOOL project and aims to showcase the methodology applied in this EU funded project to explore its potential in other formal and non-formal education contexts.

Antonia Liguori
31
 

Progress: Who's Affected?

Students often understand that technological innovation makes our lives better, but they do not see the backstory. There are people who lose their livelihoods as machines replace them. What was once a necessary job is now obsolete--even the people themselves might feel obsolete. This lesson is designed to help students understand the drawbacks of progress and, more specifically, how it affects those people who were replaced.

#SAAMteach

Madison Doss
9
 

Who am I?

Choose at least three items (image, audio, video) that tell something about you; who you are as a person, what you think is important, how you want others to “see” you.  Make sure you caption your items with your first and last name and an explanation (1-2 sentences).

Charla Floyd
3
 

Slow Looking: Untitled, by El Anatsui

In this collection, students will explore an artwork by El Anatsui, a contemporary artist whose recent work addresses global ideas about the environment, consumerism, and the social history and memory of the "stuff" of our lives. After looking closely and exploring the artwork using an adapted version of Project Zero's "Parts, Purposes, and Complexities" routine, students will create a "diamante" poem using their observations of the artwork and knowledge they gained about El Anatsui's artistic influences. Additional resources about El Anatsui, how to look at African Art, and Project Zero Thinking Routines are located at the end of the collection.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: nigeria, african art, textile, poetry, creative writing, analysis

Deborah Stokes
20
 

Effects of innovation during the 1920s

This learning lab will help you to evaluate the ways in which the innovations that came about during the roaring twenties altered American life. Moreover, you will consider how these innovations sometimes had  unintended consequences for more marginalized communities, specifically immigrants. 

#SAAMteach

Jill Stedman
10
 

Exploring Solar Power at NMAAHC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its use of renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. One of the ways NMAAHC is using renewable energy is through the use of solar panels on its roof. Although the solar panels are not visible to our visitors, they produce enough energy to power 11 average-sized U.S. homes for a year.

Use this activity to engage your students in a lesson covering solar power, electricity, and the factors that affect its production. 

Keywords: solar, power, STEM, science, LEED, environment, energy, NMAAHC, African American, National Mall

NMAAHC Education
18
 

Biodiversity! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing biodiversity. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast. 

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

Food! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing food. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

What is an ecosystem?

In this collection students will compare and contrast ecosystems in order to define them.

It can be used as part of a larger study on ecosystems and interconnections.

This collection contains images and videos depicting the biotic and abiotic elements of a desert and rainforest ecosystem. The accompanying note catcher links to an article on ecosystems from National Geographic and a TedTalk about the body as an ecosystem.


Guiding Questions: Students will construct responses to the following guiding questions as they work with this collection: 

GQ 1:  What is an ecosystem?

GQ 2: What makes a healthy ecosystem?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the guiding questions, they will understand that an ecosystem is made up of the living and non-living elements of work together to create a bubble of life. Students will learn that all of the elements of an ecosystem are interconnected and that a healthy ecosystem is diverse and well-balanced.


#learnwithTR


Elizabeth Weiss
24
 

Perspectives on Japanese-American Internment

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan during World War II, anti-Japanese paranoia increased in many parts of the United States. Many persons of Japanese decent, even those who were American citizens, were suspected of loyalty to Japan. In response to this perceived security risk, in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the internment of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan.

This lesson is intended to be used as an extension to the study of the Holocaust in English-Language Arts. Students should have some prior knowledge of World War II, Nazi propaganda and the Jewish experience in concentration camps. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute at the National Portrait Gallery (2019). #NPGTEACH

Tracy Biondi
10
 

Immigration & The Face of American Identity

This collection provides resources that can be used to introduce and discuss the following essential questions, as part of a larger "American Identity" literature-based unit:  

1) In what ways do immigrants change America?

2) What would America be like without immigrants?

3) How do immigrants' experiences contribute to a complex and multifaceted American Identity?

#SAAMteach

Joanna Dickinson
13
 

Identity

English 12 unit 

Focus on "Identity" and transition to "Conformity" and the response of the individual to environmental sources that might seek to suppress individuality

#SAAMteach

Marie Meyer
15
 

Women and men who helped New York immigrates' living conditions during the 19th and early 20th century.

This collections shows men and women who helped change the living conditions of the immigrants that flooded into New York City during the 19th and 20th centuries. They changed the way people lived by shining a light on the poor living conditions of the newest Americans.  The following people are discussed in this collection: Lillian Wald, Jane Addams, Margaret Sanger, Jacob Riis, and Theodore Roosevelt.  The themes that are discussed are: tenement living, women's health, and immigrants. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019  Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach


leigh lewis
17
 

The Arrival of the Americans and the end of Edo Japan - Post Assessment Activity

This collection serves to end the unit on Edo Japan and retake the discussion of how the period fits within the greater scene of world history. In our class, seclusion and openness of countries is an common through line, and so the arrival of the Americans effectively ending the Sakoku period is an important historical milestone. The main goal of this collection is to lead students into this dialectical reflection of how these two countries interacted and what this meant for a Japan that had consciously shut down most trade relations.  The opening lesson on Edo Japan puts in doubt how closed the country really was; this last lesson highlights how Edo Japan had evolved since the edict of 1635, and how it had to open its ports and face the conjunctions of the 19th century's international scene. 

This collection also brings into light reactions on both sides of the American arrival. Images and archives from both Japanese, as well as American witnesses, allow students to understand the motivations coming from East, as well as the West. 


Lesson plan (2 hours) 

1. Provide the students with the resources "4c United States-Japan Treaty single." "Black Ships and Samurai," "Founding Fragments - Commodore Perry," and "Matthew Calbraith Perry." Allow students time to browse at least two topics from the website and play the video "Founding Fragments - Commodore Perry" for the entire class. 

2. Using all the resources in Step 1, lead class through the visible thinking routine "True for who?" While completing this routine, highlight how each country struggles to defend their views. 

At the end of this unit, students have a fairly strong understanding of Japanese national interests. For this reason, the teacher can help provide information of the U.S.'s international stance during the 19th century. While the U.S. plays a background role in our curriculum, we do a quick mention of the Manifest Destiny and the Monroe Doctrine, as ways in which the students’ own country emulate cycles of international openness or seclusion. Following this through line, it is necessary to stress the arrival of Commodore Perry to Japan as a thematic intersection. The moment marks both the end of Edo period for Japan, and the United States’ efforts to expand their field of influence.

3. Allow students time to read further into the "Black Ships and Samurai" website. Students can also conduct quick research on the arrival of the Americans in 1853, and Japanese-American relations previous to this date.

4. Provide students a copy of Commodore Perry and President Fillmore's letter to the Emperor of Japan. Use resource "Letters of the Commodore Perry and President Fillmore to the Emperor of Japan (1852-1853)"  Do a close reading of the letters and highlight the main passages. 

5. Present the remaining images and complete a visible thinking routine "Parts/People/Interactions." Allow students to cite the letters in Step 4, as well as the images in this collection. At the end of this lesson, students are able to compare, as well as to question each country’s discourse of seclusion or non-intervention.

Denise Rodriguez
12
 

First impressions about Japan - PreAssessment activity

This collection serves as a pre-assessment activity to a unit on Edo Japan. The artwork in the module is heavily influenced by the Edo period. The goal of this short lesson is to activate imagery and ideas of Japanese art during the Edo period. 


Lesson plan (<1 hour)

Complete *ONE of the following activities:

1. Use the resource "One Step, First Step, Apple Computer, Osaka, Japan" to lead a "Think/Puzzle/Explore" routine. 

2. Use all four resources of the Japan Railway Company to complete a "See/Think/Wonder" visible thinking routine. 

3. Use either "How Japan Does It" or "MacDonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan/Tokyo Ginza Shuffle" to lead the "3-2-1 Bridge" visible thinking routine. 


*For all three routines: 

As you complete the routine, evaluate how much students already know about Japan and the lexicon that they use. Highlight key concepts written in the routine's poster. What do students know and how do these artifacts corroborate or oppose their initial ideas of Japan? Can students discern the historical nature behind some of these ads and posters? For instance, the railway ad displays a screen, and the poster for ‘How Japan Does It’ has a heavy ukiyo-e influence. In this way, these examples of commercial art tie in lasting impressions of a culture with contemporary takes on the country in a fun way. 

These three routines could also be completed in unison. Divide the class in smaller groups, provide each group with the images of the collection, and guide each group through one of the routines listed. The result as a class will be a much richer lexicon bank. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Rose Krieg
6
1-24 of 543 Collections