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Found 473 Collections

 

Autumn Mountains, after Wang Yuanqi (Translation)

Wu’s Landscapes of Southern China: A master of literati painting in the late Qing dynasty, Wu Yunlai, also known as Wu Zhongyuan, was born in Qiantang (present-day Hangzhou). Trained by his mother in painting, calligraphy, and poetry, Wu producedan outstanding array of works in various mediums from landscape painting on paper or silk to painted ceramic panels. The twelve landscape paintings in this album depict the serene and reclusive scenes of southern China, a subject favored by educated elites. Stylistically these paintings illustrate Wu’s study of early masters and his creative individual style, evident in his vivid use of color and his success in poetry and calligraphy.

Xingyu Liu
1
 

Rain or Shine: The US Postal Service

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the Postal Service. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about the postal service troubles as well as explore videos about how our mail is delivered. Families can learn about a dog that helped deliver the mail. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
81
 

Abstract food

Images illustrate how artists use simplification and zooming in to abstract images of popular foods.

Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Community Murals

These images come from murals that depict people at work.  What jobs do you see them doing? How does each job help the community?

Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Jacob Lawrence

Paintings by artist Jacob Lawrence of people working and playing in their community.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Anna May Wong x Sally Wen Mao

How can you be a changemaker in society? 

This topical collection honors the life of film icon Anna May Wong by pairing images from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery collections with poetry by celebrated contemporary poet Sally Wen Mao. Wong's film and television career spanned from 1919 to 1960, and included numerous star turns, transnational celebrity, and an array of firsts for an Asian American actress. It was also a career forged in the shadow of--and in defiance of--widespread xenophobia, leaving a legacy that takes on a new cast and consequence today, in an era of COVID-19 and virulent anti-Asian racism. 

After viewing this topical collection, visit https://smithsonianapa.org/anna-may-wong/ to:

  • download a set of postcards that include portraits of Anna May Wong and Sally Wen Mao's poetry
  • watch a short video by Sally Wen Mao about her "patron saint," and
  • instructions for making your own postcards.
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
29
 

Smithsonian Social Studies Online: What happens when cultures collide? / Smithsonian Estudios Sociales en Línea: ¿Qué ocurre cuando dos culturas chocan?

This collection contains lesson plans and resources from across the Smithsonian to help students critically examine this essential question through multiple Social Studies content areas. 

Esta colección contiene planes de lecciones y recursos de todo el Smithsonian para ayudar a estudiantes a examinar críticamente esta esencial pregunta a través de múltiples areas de contenido en Estudios Sociales.

National Museum of American History
17
 

Love, Deuce, All, Tennis for the Win!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring tennis. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about tennis as well as a video about Wimbledon's Greatest Moments. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Exhibition Spotlight: After Icebergs

In the summer of 1859, Frederic Edwin Church (1826–1900)—the most celebrated American landscape painter of his time—journeyed to Newfoundland and Labrador, in the far Northeast of Canada, to study and sketch icebergs. More than one hundred and fifty years later, Church's studies remain poignant and relevant. In this collection, explore Church's studies, featured in exhibition After Icebergs at Cooper Hewitt. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
33
 

ABC Easy As 123

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the alphabet. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they wonder, and compare how they are alike and different. Families can check out alphabets and consider how each of the letters are designed. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

Animal Vessels

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
48
 

"Explore with Smithsonian Experts" Film Series

This video series, Explore with Smithsonian Experts, connects students and teachers with the skill and technique of Smithsonian experts who describe their work at our nation's museums. In each short film, experts introduce new ways to observe, record, research and share, while using real artifacts and work experiences.

Keywords: entomology, arthropod, insects, beetles, ants, scientific method, verification, President Abraham Lincoln, March on Washington, The Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, flight, astrophotography, cosmos, astronomy, abstract art, El Anatsui, portraits, portraiture, President George Washington, Gertrude Stein, Gordon, Pocahontas, LL Cool J, Kehinde Wiley, Nicholasa Mohr, Dolores Huerta, Puerto Rico, Luis Muñoz Marín, Rudolfo Anaya, urban photography, Shifting States: Iraq, Luis Cruz Azaceta, choreography, dance, Japanese American incarceration (internment) camps, World War II, Queen Kapi'olani, Hawaii, diplomacy, Ecuadorian boat seat, Anansi spider, Ángel Suárez Rosado, baseball, Latino community, archiving, community, Anacostia

#EthnicStudies

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
44
 

How We See The Sun

This collection focuses on the Sun as the center of our Solar System and is central to people's lives around the world.  This collection includes art and science images that depict the Sun, and recommendations on how to explore these images using close looking. 

Keyword: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
78
 

Viral Histories: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

We must all learn to navigate uncertainty in these increasingly complex times. We can begin to do this by understanding that we are part of a larger community, recognize that the pandemic has led to xenophobia towards and endangerment of vulnerable communities, and accepting that we can make choices every day to help combat hate. 

Throughout the Viral Histories event we have asked viewers to reflect on the question: How do we choose to strengthen a community in the middle of an emergency? This collection includes exemplars of individuals and organizations, today and in the past, who have answered this question in different ways. 

We encourage you to explore these resources from the National Museum of American History and partners as you think about your answer to the question: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

#NMAH

National Museum of American History
19
 

Symbols

Jean-Marie Galing
17
 

Museum Architecture

How does the design of a museum . . .

  • reflect the time in which it was built?
  • reflect its purpose?
  • reflect the values of society?
  • fit in (or not) with the surrounding community?

How does the interior design affect the way people experience the space?

Jean-Marie Galing
30
 

Fabulous Fabrics

Use images to introduce a stamp-printing lesson with primary students. Observe selected images and discuss. . . 

  • What shapes or lines do you see?
  • Which fabrics have repeat patterns?
  • Which fabrics have alternating patterns?
  • What could the fabric be used for?

Play a sorting game with images printed on cards. Categories for sorting could include stripes, plaid, checkerboard, floral, polka dot, etc.

ART MAKING CHALLENGE: 

  • Students will stamp print on paper with cardboard edges, stampers, or found objects to create patterns. 
  • Printed paper will then be cut into clothing for collage self portraits.

Jean-Marie Galing
23
 

Memorial Day Celebration: Women in the Military

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring women in the military. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they used to think and what they think now that they learned more. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about World War II as well as explore WASPs. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

Ellen Rogers
29
 

Area Artists: Washington, D.C.

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore three different visual artists with ties to Washington, D.C.

As a black women artists, Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones encountered many barriers to success. All three artists lived and worked in Washington, D.C. throughout their careers. They contributed to the social, artistic, and academic communities within the nation's capital and beyond. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones, and their approaches to art and art making. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their knowledge of Washington D.C. history and foster an appreciation for great artists. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • Who are Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones?
  • How were these artists' personal lives and artistic practices shaped by their time in Washington, D.C.?
  • What inspired each artist to create their works?
  • How are the artists' works similar? How are they different?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
13
 

In Full Color: The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s-70s

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through this collection of resources from different Smithsonian museum and biographies of famous artists, students will learn more about the major influences and themes of this period of African American revolution and expression. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in synthesizing information and analyzing primary sources. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What are the dominant themes of the social and political climate of the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did the major events of the 1960s and 70s shape the artistic production of the period?
  • Who were some of the influential figures in the Black Arts Movement?
  • What are some of the shared goals of African American artists during the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did artists during this period respond to the the social and political climate?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
36
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Memorial Day Celebration: Native American Veterans

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Native American Veterans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they used to think and what they think now that they learned more. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about World War II as well as explore code talkers during wars. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

Ellen Rogers
19
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
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