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Found 695 Collections

 

James Baldwin: The Transatlantic Commuter

Beginning in the late 1940s, the notable African American writer, James Baldwin (1924-1987), lived abroad for much of his life. While acknowledging the benefits of his residence abroad to all of his works and life story, he always considered himself an American living as a “transatlantic commuter.”  This Learning Lab Collection asks you to analyze the documents, images, and objects that give insight into James Baldwin's life as transatlantic commuter and to use these objects of Baldwin to understand how they impacted his work and writings. 

A downloadable PDF workbook is included. The questions and activities are arranged as they appear in the Learning Lab Collection and are designed to enhance student exploration.

This Learning Lab is a companion piece of the digital NMAAHC exhibition Chez Baldwin.

Keywords: nmaahc, African, american, James, Baldwin, travel, Atlantic, commuter, writing, literature, Paris, New York, France, Turkey, Istanbul, Switzerland, United States, #NMAAHCteach

National Museum of African American History and Culture
27
 

To Mail a Letter

This collection includes archival photos & video to guide our study of letter writing as a means of staying connected during the COVID-19 period of distance learning.

Catherine Norton
21
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
23
 

Hustle in Our Muscles

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring muscles. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about muscles, watch how animals use their muscles, and listen to the read aloud Sebastian's Roller Skates. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
42
 

Remnants from the exploration of space

Clothing, spacecraft, tools, and mementos to better understand the achievement of space exploration.  

David Ball
201
 

Caretakers: Zoom In Activity

Zoom in on a small part of an artwork, tell stories, then zoom out! A discussion-based looking activity.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Caretakers: Compare and Contrast Activity

Step 1:  Compare two artworks... what's similar and different? Step 2: Look closely to uncover the big idea of one artwork. How does your thinking change when you see two artworks, side-by-side?

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Caretakers: Build a Story Activity

Work with your student to create a story inspired by an artwork. Challenge yourself to let your student take the lead!

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
18
 

Printable Activity Pages and Coloring Sheets

This collection includes: 

  • Printable Activity Pages (Each on a single theme, include word and number games, art exercises, and fun quizzes. With each activity, kids learn about something new, from the anatomy of the giant squid to the history of chocolate.)
  • Printable Coloring Sheets (Each with different museum objects from across the Smithsonian, including shells, flowers, beasts and more!)

Keywords: puzzles, vocabulary, presidency, elections, animals, play, crosswords, crayons, colored pencils, color

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
63
 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring superheroes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about creating Marvel Comics as well as a video about a really amazing comic book store owner. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth.

In SITES' traveling exhibition Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth., African American changemakers are highlighted to illustrate their outstanding legacy and contributions. These individuals are icons often rendered invisible by a country, yet uplifted by a major culture. The following images showcase the legacy of men and women featured in the exhibition, illuminating their greatest works, interactions with the community, and so forth. Every individual, whether featured in the exhibit or Learning Lab, affirms the power of the African American journey and, ultimately, the American experience. 

As you navigate throughout this Learning Lab, take notice of the various sections the Men of Change are divided into; such as Storytellers, Myth-breakers, Fathering, Community, Imagining, Catalysts and Loving.

#NHD2020

#BreakingBarriers

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
70
 

Planets of the Solar System

Through this collection, students will deepen their understanding of each planet in our solar system.  Pairing the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine with an embroidered quilt of the solar system will pique students' interest in the dwarf planet, Pluto.  After discovering the year that the quilt was made, students can explore the website to learn the history of Pluto.

Using the provided websites, students will work in groups to research a planet.  They will use the obtained information to write a headline that captures the most interesting aspect of the planet and to create a model of the planet.

#PZPGH

Jamie Bonacorso
21
 

Libraries From Your Couch

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring libraries. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about research as well as listen to the read aloud Library Lion. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

Engaging Families through Art and Technology Programs: "Illuminating the Self"

This collection details an art and community engagement project that the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access did with educators from the National Portrait Gallery and the Fairfax County Family Literacy Program. It includes assets and resources designed to help teachers, museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate the program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

"Illuminating the Self / Illuminándonos" was a five-day bilingual program in which pairs of immigrant mothers and their middle school-aged children worked together to learn about portraiture from the 2016 exhibition of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition winning portraits. First we talked about portraiture in general, and then focused the discussion on light and shadow. Next, students took photographic portraits of each other and chose one to recreate. We projected the photographs in black and white onto a wall, and had the students trace the outlines of their photographs on their blank drawing paper. They they worked with charcoals to fill in their portraits and refine their drawings. Participants also visited the Outwin exhibition. Finally, their portraits were displayed at the National Portrait Gallery's Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day.

Program surveys indicated improved literacy, technology, and communication skills to share heritage, traditions, and talents; increased sense of empowerment and self-esteem, strengthened parent-child relationships and community bonds, and creation of a core of mentors. One mother reported that before the program she would never have entered an art museum because she wouldn't have known what to do, but that now she would not be able to pass by without stopping in. As well, several family participants have returned to the Smithsonian asking to volunteer at future Smithsonian events.

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
38
 

It's a Beautiful Day in Your Neighborhood

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring neighborhoods. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about making maps as well as listen to the read aloud How I Learned Geography. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
55
 

Monologues!

Select a piece of art in this collection and tell us what they are thinking about! 

Write a three paragraph monologue using dramatic structure (beginning, middle, and end) for the subject in the artwork you’ve selected. IDENTIFY the art including the artist. Post a picture with your monologue. Tell us what the subject in the painting is thinking about or secretly desires, or write from the perspective of someone looking at the subject of the artwork.

Michael Allard
60
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

rajeeva voleti
58
 

Making: Katagami-Inspired Stencils

In this collection, you'll find the process to creating and using your own nature-inspired stencil, inspired by Cooper Hewitt's Katagami exhibition on view from March 30, 2019 to October 27, 2019. Grab materials and follow along, or find inspiration for later! 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Prototyping: Making and Exploration

In this collection, explore prototyping. Here, you'll find examples of prototypes from the Cooper Hewitt collection and a prototyping activity to do at home or in the classroom.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Design Storytelling: Creating Narratives around Design Objects

Try something new with us. Selecting from the objects in this collection, pulled from current Cooper Hewitt exhibitions Contemporary Muslim Fashions and Willi Smith: Street Couture, craft a narrative, real (researched) or imagined. Think of it as a creative exercise using creatively-designed objects. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Culture and Aesthetics Meet Physics: Why Soviet and American Spacesuits Look Different

This collection was developed as part of the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program under the theme of “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.” It has been modified by Jodi Halligan to use as a learning activity on observing differences between Soviet and American space suits and related technology and design.

Jodi Halligan
15
 

Make a COLLAGASAURUS!

What: Learn about history, art, culture and science while creating a fantastic creature with the Smithsonian's Open Access collections.

Age: 2-9

How:
1. Download the COLLAGASAURUS! how-to book created by author/illustrator of the "Astronuts", Jon Scieszka and Steven Weinberg: https://learninglab.si.edu/cab...
2. Use some of the images in this set to make your own creature!
a. For younger children, review body parts they need to make a creature; print out images and have kiddos work on scissor and glue skills. Once their creature is complete, ask them how it would move, how it would eat, where it would live.
b. For older kids, either do the analog method used for younger kids (see 2a.) or use it as an opportunity to work on computer skills using imaging software. Talk with them about the collections they chose; how old they are, where they are from, etc. Discuss how the creature would move and interact with the world given the body parts that were chosen.

3. Afterwards, get a behind-the-scenes peek at how Steven and Jon collage Smithsonian Open Access images -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=z_-LVBQsXG8


Effie Kapsalis
97
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
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