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Found 431 Collections

 

Jonathan's Collection

Over the course of the Scholar Program, the underlying theme that has resonated with me is design's interaction with people. I like to think of design as problem solving -- and for the majority of my time with the scholar program, I have learned to focus on developing projects to fit a group of people or other subjects.

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
7
 

Método Científico

Consideramos lamentable que en algunas organizaciones se elabore mal su Metodo Cientifico
o no analizan las Etapas del Metodo Cientifico,  en otros casos  realizan una inadecuado
Tipo de Investigacion,   No conocen las aportaciones de Aristoteles,  

Por todo ello:

  • Se redacta la Visión sin base científica alguna, solo se busca una frase motivadora que se dice es el sueño de un líder.
  • Se redactan objetivos operativos los cuales  se los confunde con objetivos estratégicos.
  • Lo peor es que en la mayoría de estos “Planes Estratégicos” no se incluye ninguna estrategia.
  • O sea son Planes que de Estratégicos nada tienen.


mario vazquez
1
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
21
 

Investigating: Civil War Portraits

In this student activity, students will investigate nine portraits of people involved in the Civil War, both from the Union and the Confederacy. Through these portraits, students will gain an understanding of: experiences of people on both sides of the war; why these people are seen as historically significant; and how portraiture can communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen. Included with each portrait is a video that explains the historical significance of the person depicted.

Big Ideas: 

  • Why are these people, and the developments they shaped, seen as historically significant? 
  • How does portraiture communicate how a person wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen?

Ross Bosse
10
 

Inlaid Imagery: A Different Way to Draw through Korean Ceramics

This collection briefly introduces the art of incision and inlay in ancient Korean ceramics as a unique method of creating imagery that can be both meaningful and beautiful. While these traditional ceramics known as celadon were not unique to Korea, as a functional art form they did reach new heights of craft and expression during the Goryeo Dynasty (935-1392) thanks to design innovations. One of the most notable modifications made by Korean potters was the practice of cutting away some clay (incising) and adding a different type (inlay), to create contrasts, patterns, shapes, images, and other visual and physical effects. 

As with other kinds of traditional Korean visual art, the images created on ceramics include familiar Korean folks motifs such as animals, plants, or elements of nature that carried specific aspirational meanings. This collection also provides examples of such folk images portrayed in ceramics, and explores some examples of such symbolism, as an inspiration for users to create their own images in a creative workshop. 

In terms of end goals, this collection will:

  1. Introduce Korean traditional incised ceramics 
  2. Help users learn to recognize the technique
  3. Introduce Korean folk images portrayed in such ceramics, and their symbolic nature
  4. Inspire users to create their own Korean folk-style image
Adam Wojciechowicz
16
 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

Arizona State Museum Donald Cordry Photographs of Mexican Indian Costumes

The Donald B. Cordry collection contains photographs of Mexican mask-makers and textile weavers. Many of these photographs appear in his two books Mexican Masks and Mexican Indian Costumes.

Arizona State Museum
54
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

Issues of gender inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining this issue with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. The collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service? In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

National Postal Museum
31
 

Journey Through an Exploded Star: An Online Interactive

In this collection, students will explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space. They'll explore real data that provides evidence for the dispersal of several elements produced by the explosion of massive stars, specifically through the Cassiopeia A supernova. Then they’ll put their knowledge into practice by navigating the remains of the supernova in the online interactive “Journey Through an Exploded Star.”

  1. The activity begins with “DISCOVER." The students will go through a series of slides, learning first how the visible spectrum of light is only a small part of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, about the different telescopes scientists use to view the electromagnetic radiation across that spectrum, and finally how they've used that data to form a composite view of our universe, specifically through a 3D model of the Cassiopeia A supernova.
  2. The “PLAY” online interactive then takes the students on a first-person flight through the center of this exploded star. The interactive is split into two parts: The first part is a 2 minute guided fly-through, where Kim Arcand, project lead of the original 3D visualization found in the collection, explains the different forms of light and the elements that are traceable under those spectrums. The second is a free explore option, where students are able to manipulate the different spectrums by adjusting filters as they choose. Both parts of the interactive reinforce what they’ve previously learned within the collection about light across the EMS. This interactive works across browsers and requires no software downloads. Also included is a 360 video tour that works on mobile devices and Google Cardboard.
  3. Finally, an extension activity is included that allows students to take photographs using real MicroObservatory robotic telescopes located at Smithsonian Observatory sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Amado, Arizona to create their very own authentic astrophotographs. They’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies.

This online activity could be used to augment study about the forms of radiation light can take, learning about supernovae and what happens after a star explodes, as well as learning about some of the different careers in science that are available (astrophysicists, astrophotographers, engineers, and visualization experts). As with all Learning Lab collections, it is built to be freely modified and adapted to fit your specific needs. 

Cody Coltharp
21
 

Becoming the Historian: Historical Context

Historical thinking skills allow historians to better practice and interpret history. This series teaches students how to develop these skills to become better historians themselves.

This Learning Lab will guide students through the process of defining historical context and practicing employing strategies from an example dealing with the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. 

 Historical context is the background information that informs a deeper understanding of a historical individual, group or event. Historical context is important because it allows historians to better understand history in the ways a historical individual or group understood the world around them, which leads historians to analyze the past more accurately. 

 Keywords: nmaahc, African, American, historical, thinking, skills, context, historical, contextualization, background, 1968, Poor People's Campaign, history, interpret, analyze

NMAAHC Education
15
 

Martin Luther King Jr.: The Later Years (1965 - 1968)

Martin Luther King Jr.’s fight for equality did not end with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. In his last years, King’s focus shifted toward achieving economic equality and combating poverty in the United States, denouncing the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War, and contending with the rise of The Black Power Movement.

 This Learning Lab highlights documents, images, objects, and media from the National Museum of African American History and Culture and other Smithsonian units that help to tell the story of Martin Luther King Jr.’s final years, his assassination, and his enduring legacy.

Keywords: nmaahc, Martin Luther King Jr, MLK, Jr., African American, civil rights, last years, Chicago, Vietnam, poverty, Poor People's Campaign, Resurrection City, Memphis, assassination, legacy, Coretta Scott King, Reverend 

NMAAHC Education
48
 

Korean Ceramics: Looking at Decorative Processes

In this activity, students will examine Korean ceramics and use visual evidence to speculate about the processes used to create them, paying special attention to decorative techniques.  Questions from the Project Zero Artful Thinking Routine "Colors / Shapes / Lines," help students make detailed observations by drawing their attention to the forms in an artwork and giving them specific categories of things to look for.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying ceramics or Korean art, or to student creation of artwork.

#AsiaTeachers 

Keywords: pottery, observation, inlay, stamping, types, celadon, goryeo, clay, ceramic

Tess Porter
8
 

Korean Burial Practices in the Goryeo Period

In this activity, students will explore personal objects found in stone caskets from the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  After looking closely at the types of objects found, students will consider why these particular objects may have been chosen to memorialize the deceased, what this may reveal about those who lived during the Goryeo period, and similarities and differences in how objects are used in the burial practices of other cultures.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying Korea during the Goryeo period, cross-cultural and cross-historical funerary practices, and more.

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: archaeology, archaeologist, tomb, funeral, death

Tess Porter
16
 

Korean Art: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in celadon ceramics in order to understand the artistic practices and aesthetics of the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  Many of the Goryeo celadons in the Freer|Sackler's collections originally adorned palaces, Buddhist temples, and private residences of the aristocracy.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying ceramics, Korean art, the Goryeo dynasty, and more.  Click Read More for ideas about how to prompt further inquiry using the Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine "Think / Puzzle / Explore" and resources on the elements of art and principles of design.

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: clay, pottery, sculpture, vessel, cheongja

Tess Porter
13
 

Korean+Art+Culture+Language

This Learning Lab Collection is designed for students who are studying Korean. Students will explore Korean art from the Freer collection, and learn more about Korean culture, history, and tradition by using artworks. Through the exploring art and learning Korean process, student will develop a greater understanding of the unique aspects of Korean culture and the structure of Korean language. 

Keywords: Korean, Language, Art, Culture, Tradition

#AsiaTeachers

This Learning Lab Collection is following Virginia Department of Education Standards of Learning for World Language: Non-Roman Alphabet Language for character-based language. Click here to find more information (p. 29-46) 

Level 1: Students begin to develop communicative competence in the target language and expand their understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language.

Level 2: Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

Level 3: Students communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using structures that are more complex in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

Level 4: Students continue to develop their communicative and culture competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication.

Level 5: Students are able to exchange and support opinions on a variety of topics related to historical and contemporary events and issues at a proficiency level commensurate with their study. 


SSCCKoreanSchool
25
 

Rediscovering Korea's Past - Goryeo Period

The Goryeo period (918-1392) is referred to as Korea’s age of enlightenment, when arts and cultures flourished under the patronage of the Goryeo aristocracy. Buddhism was the official state religion, which Buddhist temples and members of the royal court committed a huge portion of their resources to the practice of faith and to the creation of ritual implements and artworks as expressions of devotion. 

Tremendous ceramics, lacquer wares, Buddhist paintings and sculptures, illustrated manuscripts, and metal crafts in Buddhist symbols and motifs were made during this period. The Goryeo period is widely known as the jade-green glazed, graceful shape, elegant floral motifs and decorative inlaid design celadons to the Western culture.  

This Learning Lab Collection is created for Summer Institute for Educators, Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections. 

Keywords: Korea, Goryeo, Celadon, Buddhism, Inlay, Jade-green, Glazed, Ceramics

#AsiaTeachers

Minchi Hyun
21
 

The Corona's Cooling Power

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its construction using renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. To minimize energy use, the architects and engineers designed the building to allow lots of natural light inside of the museum. The Corona, the ornamental bronze-colored metal lattice that covers the museum like a crown covers a head, helps to keep the museum cool by allowing some sunlight inside, but by blocking the rest. As a result, the museum uses less electricity for lights and air conditioning. 

But how does it work? Have your students complete the following experiment to find out!

NMAAHC Education
14
 

How Pittsburgh Helped Us Get to the Moon: Alcoa and the Lunar Module

This Learning Lab collection is designed to accompany the Pittsburgh CLO's teacher guide for Beyond the Moon. In this new Gallery of Heroes musical, fifteen-year-old Maya has big dreams of being the first person to set foot on Mars but believes she is simply too ordinary to become an astronaut. Her view of what is possible transforms when actual NASA astronauts past and present, including Neil Armstrong, Mae Jemison, and José Hernandez, take her on an amazing journey to discover that extraordinary feats are accomplished by regular people one step at a time.

The activity is based on "Touchdown," created by PBS Kids Design Squad. It was adapted by the Heinz History Center to include the story of the Alcoa aluminum innovation used for the legs of the Lunar Module. 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
5
 

Time

The theme of TIME can be explored in art using key concepts throughout the semester or year. Explore various concepts related to the idea of TIME by playing the Connections Card Game. The mind maps made after playing the game can be used as a reference throughout the course. 

Teacher Preparation:

  • Download and print images on card stock (resource attached to this collection). Create multiple sets for small groups to play the game.
  • Print Key Concept Cards (resource attached to this collection)

Student Activity:

  • Take turns choosing a card and connecting it to a key concept by placing it near an appropriate Concept Card.
  • Defend choice with evidence in the image.
  • After all cards have been played, students make inferences about how people experience, measure or represent time.
  • Small groups collaborate to draw a mind map to illustrate their ideas.
  • Present maps in a "Carousel Interview." One group member stays with the mind map to answer questions; other group members visit tables to explore mind maps and ask questions.
  • Return to original group. Encapsulate overarching ideas and record them on your group's mind map.
Jean-Marie Galing
28
 

Examining the Transcontinental Railroad

Railroads started well before 1869, but it was not until that year that the nation was bound together by a commitment to build the first transcontinental system. On May 10, 1869, the driving of a golden spike, signaled the ceremonial end to a process that had been going on for 6 years of construction, engineering, and human toil. Two companies, one starting in Omaha, Nebraska and the other in Sacramento, California competed to lay track towards each other to join the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads. Their reward for each mile was government money and lots of it. By the time that they met at Promontory Summit, Utah, vast sums of money and untold human labor and sacrifice had been expended on this incredible technical endeavor. A single track united the continent's Wester and Eastern regions. Travel from East to West used to take months by wagon train, could now be measured in mere days. This collection utilizes Primary Source student review strategies from the Library of Congress' Primary Source Analysis Tools

Brian Ausland
14
 

Artifact Analysis

In this collection we explore the definition of an artifact and analyze various artifacts from multiple cultural periods.

Idaho State Museum
18
 

Bracero Program: Unveiling Stories

In this activity, students will examine photographs documenting the Bracero Program, the largest guest-worker program in US history. Started in 1942 as a temporary war measure to address labor demands in agriculture and railroads, the program allowed Mexican nationals to take temporary agricultural work in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and 24 other states. By the time the program ended in 1964, over 4.6 million contracts were awarded.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will analyze the stories these photographs tell about the experiences of braceros in this program, and the impact of these stories in multiple contexts. Additional resources (primary sources, a digital exhibition, and an article) and information on how to use these routines in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

Keywords: mexican, immigration, work, migration, migrant workers, agriculture, reform, politics, government, leonard nadel, photojournalism, activity, inquiry strategy, global competency, global competence, latino, chicano, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, 1940s, 40s, 1950s, 50s, 1960s, 60s

#LatinoHAC

Tess Porter
36
 

4 Forces of Flight

Photos and Articles that are supplemental learning to the forces of flight. All artifacts are interactive for student engagement and assessment.

Dalton Alatan
10
 

Aztecs and Coding

Here is a collection of coding games using Scratch interactive media using MakeyMakey , integrating Aztec games, culture and information.

In this collection, I am going to highlight Aztec games and culture to recreate  projects that I do in my my own design classroom with my students based on these historical artifacts.

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artists to use designs inspired by the Aztec games and culture to make a Scratch game or remix with the examples I have posted in this collection.  This collection shows you a pathway to create coding and designs based on these  Aztec games and culture,  to create games similar in motif and structure to the originals. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring, especially with coding aspect of the lesson.)

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. In order to gain perspective on these  cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own coded games/designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these  people. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these  cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching designs and motifs based on this culture. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Scratch or another coding app like Processing

The students will then use these coded games with MakeyMakey and a create a controller like these musical instruments/controllers my students created at Labz at my school Charter High School for Architecture and Design in Philadelphia.

Happy Coding!


#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
27
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