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Found 4,919 Collections

 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to gain a better understanding of the 1920s to 1930s and see real examples of artifacts from that time period.

Paris Chrudimsky
10
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme "The Search for an American Identity"

This collection is designed to demonstrate, and asks workshop participants to consider, various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools.  Included here are a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. After the flashcard section you'll see a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  Finally, the collection also includes a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.

This collection is adapted from a larger teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," - the subject of the Montgomery College - Smithsonian 2019 Fellowship program. 


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
36
 

Dominic 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to learn about the 1920-1930s

Your Mom
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Looking for artifacts from 1920-1930s I guess

Sheck Wes
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to use pictures to show how life was in the 1920s and 1930s. The artifacts will represent how life was during this time. In the 1920s people lived luxurious lives. However, after the Stock Market Crash, the 1930s became a stressful, penniless time. 

Nicole Eckard
10
 

Vincent Fullentes 1920s and 1930s Artifacts.

The purpose of this project is to know what happened 20's-30's decades in order to explain the importance of said decades. And to learned our mistake in this year and to be better person.



Paul Vincent Fullentes
10
 

Cadavona 1920s and 1930s Collection

To uncover the artifacts of the time period of 1920s to 1930.

Jacob Cadavona
10
 

rachel turner 1920s and 1930s artifacts

The purpose of this history  project is to demonstrate our understanding pf the 1920s and 1930s by finding photographs from these times and write about them.

rachel cameroonie
10
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to use pictures and artifacts to show how life was in the 1920s and 1930s. The pictures will reflect the 1920s' luxurious ways and the 1930s' Great Depression. 

Danielle Burch
10
 

Exploring the Amazing World of Lichens

This collection supports the free Smithsonian Science How webcast, Exploring the Amazing World of Lichens featuring Dr. Manuela Dal Forno, scheduled for March 28, 2019. Manu is a scientist at the Smithsonian who studies lichens, a lichenologist. She collects lichens from all over the world, depositing them into the U.S. National Herbarium, which is located at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Manu identifies the lichens she collects with observations of how the lichen looks, their DNA data and where they were found.

Lichens are a symbiotic relationship between algae and fungus. They have been on earth for millions of years, living on rocks, trees, and soil in all different habitats on all seven continents. Even though lichens are all around us, scientists are still learning about what they are, where they live, and how many different species of lichens there are.

Fungus is any group of spore-producing organisms feeding on organic matter, and include molds, yeast, mushrooms, and toadstools. Algae is a simple, non-flowering plant. Algae contain chlorophyll and produce sugar through photosynthesis, like other plants, but do not have true stems, roots, leaves, or vascular tissue like most other plants. Lichenization is a fungal lifestyle, and therefore the name of lichen is the name of the fungus component.

When you look at a lichen, what you’re looking at is the “house” that the fungus and algae grow together. Scientists call this house a “thallus.” When algae and fungus come together to form this house, we see a lichen. This partnership is called a symbiotic relationship, because it helps both the fungus and algae survive. Research has shown that lichens are not a natural biological group, meaning they do not all come from a single common ancestor, in other words, lichens have many origins. Currently there are almost 20,000 species of lichenized fungi known.

In this symbiotic relationship, the fungus and algae benefit from being associated with each other. The fungus provides the house, its shelter (the thallus). This shelter helps the algae survive in habitats where it would otherwise be exposed to the elements and possibly could not survive. The algae provide food for the fungus, in the form of sugar. The sugar is a byproduct of photosynthesis that occurs within the algae.

Lichens are very important for the environment. They are an important food source for many animals, provide nest materials for birds, and provide habitat and material for biomimicry for insects and other organisms.

Lichens are also important for humans by providing natural dyes, perfumes, litmus paper, and even food. Humans even use lichens as bio-indicators, organisms that help humans monitor the health of the environment. Some species of lichens are sensitive to environmental pollution, so their presence or absence can help us understand more about the health of the environment, like air quality. 

Lichens produce over one thousand different chemical compounds, most of them unique to lichens. These compounds include acids and pigments. Some chemicals may even fluoresce under UV light, making them important components for lichen identification.

Lichens have DNA, which is used to identify lichen and compare relationships amongst and within species. DNA analysis has been an important tool for lichenologists in identifying and understanding the biodiversity of lichens.


Sign up for the Smithsonian Science How webcast to introduce your students to Lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno! The program airs at 11am and 2pm on March 28, 2019. Sign up and view the program here: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/...  

Maggy Benson
26
 

AP Human Geography

The images in this collection were inspired by the curriculum standards for AP Human Geography. 

Marin Layne Williams
90
 

senses

larisse young
2
 

Map Key

#twutech

Sakeithia Rhea
3
 

What Kind of Weather?

Students will be able to observe the weather and describe what kinds of clothes are appropriate for different kinds of weather. #TWUtech

Kyla Doles
4
 

Parts of a Tree

Students will be able to identify and label the parts of a tree.

#TWUtech

Karla Carranza
4
 

Eagle

Bald eagle skull.

eunika burroughs
3
 

La Purisima Mission Visitor Center

Explore the wonders behind the La Purisima Mission Visitor Center!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
39
 

La Purisima Mission Church

Come along and explore the Church History behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the Church at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
16
 

Military History at La Purisima Misison

Come along and explore the military history behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the soldiers at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
12
 

lesson plans

how to teach students about the plants life cycle #TWUtech 

emily andino
5
 

Butterfly Life Cycle

#TWUtech

Lizbeth Feria Avila
3
 

Using Close Investigation of Artworks to Tell Stories and Take Perspectives

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover the deeper meaning of and build an understanding behind an artist’s work, reveal an artist’s personal values, as well as begin developing empathy and sparking curiosity through close observation, perspective-taking and questioning. This deeper look into artwork can be used as a catalyst for students to share their own works, and act as an agent for action in their larger community.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
28
 

Deciphering the Code: Understanding Messages Through Symbol Exploration

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover the complexity behind symbols found in art and artifacts.  Curiosity and wonderment are sparked as students use close looking strategies to precisely describe what they see.  Students can then apply these findings to reveal a deeper meaning behind the symbols and the identities of the designer and users.  Students will be inspired to create their own stamps as they explore how symbols share messages and bridge connections to people and diverse cultures.

Andrea Croft
31
 

Flowers All Around for 1st/2nd grade

#TWUtech

Jenifer Pena
8
1-24 of 4,919 Collections