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Found 4,133 Collections

 

The Wild West through the eyes of Charles M. Russell.

Painting by Charles M. Russell. He is a famous artist who painted pictures of the Wild West during the 1800's.

Bryce Willis
4
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 9-10 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.



Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

Environmental Stewardship through Art

This collection was designed for elementary classes to infuse global competencies into an established study of open space and environmental stewardship.  Birds are often a topic of study in primary classrooms, and this framework can help students start thinking about environmental stewardship through an initial study of birds. Guided by thinking routines, students examine birds and think about how other cultures have shown their interest in nature. They will also start thinking about why studying the needs of local birds is important to taking care of their local environment. Finally, students begin to explore why taking care of the birds and environment also might be important to the world.

This collection is meant to be used as a unit over several days. Please feel free to copy and adapt it for your own use. 

The art used in this collection comes from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery collections. Many pieces were featured in an exhibition called "Dream Worlds: Modern Japanese Prints and Paintings from the Robert O. Muller Collection", which was on view November 2004-January 2005.

Tags: birds, environmental stewardship, open space, thinking routines, global competency, essential questions, human impact, Japan, Japanese art, Ohara Koson, woodblock printing, seasons, cherry blossoms, teacher, student, nature, crow, heron, magpie, pheasant, artful thinking

#visiblethinking

Eveleen Eaton
12
 

2018 National High School Design Competition

This Learning Lab was created as a resource for students and teachers participating in the 2018 National High School Design Competition.

This year's competition challenges students to make the everyday accessible by considering a place, process, or object they regularly use, identifying a challenge that a user with a disability might have with it, and designing a solution that addresses that challenge and makes the place, process, or object more accessible for all.

For more details on the competition go to https://www.cooperhewitt.org/2...

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
44
 

Design Case Study: Eone Bradley Timepiece

Explore the design story behind the Bradley Timepiece in Cooper Hewitt's collection and learn about empathy, creative problem solving, inclusive design, and the design process used to bring it to life.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 
  • Connect design objects to the design process


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
12
 

The Search for an American Identity

We live in a multicultural, multilingual, multinational America, which offers complicated, imposing, unsettling questions about American identity.  There are no easy answers to what is an American identity or perhaps no answers at all.  What is an American identity is an important subject in an ever changing America, and Smithsonian Institution exhibits and objects on display in various museums help us to seek answers to the question of what is identity and what is American identity.

Marilyn Mann
156
 

SOB, SOB and Homegoing: Black Representation and Identity in African and African American Art

The collection contains work from an SAAM summer session from 2018 inspired by SOB,SOB by Marshall and is centered around the reading of Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It is meant to be a resource for teachers seeking to consider identity critically, incorporate meaningful diversity, and promote the importance of complex representation. #SAAMteach

Loren Lee
76
 

Harris-Stowe State University Collection

On March 22, 2018, the Upward Bound Tech & Tour Team organized by Le’Passion Darby, Office of Minority Student Affairs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) completed a Digital Photography Practicum at Harris-Stowe State University. Harris-Stowe State University is a Historically Black University (or HBCU) located in St. Louis, Missouri (USA). This collection includes photographs and videos taken and curated by Upward Bound students.

Upward Bound is a federally funded program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and is part of the Federal TRiO Programs. The program’s objective is to support participants in their preparation for college entrance.

UIUC’s Upward Bound Tech & Tour Program trains students in the use of digital tools to document their experience during visits to higher education institutions, and to take a curatorial look at the sites and artifacts on campus, providing students with practical opportunities for professional and marketing skills in digital arts. Learning Lab was used as the host platform for the curated content and SCLDA staff provided a webinar and feedback during the project.

Harris-Stowe State University (1857) is named for American abolitionist and author Harriet Beecher Stowe and U.S. Commissioner of Education (1889) William Torrey Harris. Originally, two separate, segregated colleges focused on teacher training (1857, 1890) - the campuses were integrated as a result of Brown v. Board (1954) - and today, Harris-Stowe State University is a multi-degree university with an emphasis on entrepreneurship, education, and urban affairs. 

Student curators for this collection are: Alie W., Leavell A., and Tara H.

For a view of the program’s curriculum, see: Upward Bound Tech & Tour: Harris Stowe-State University.

Extra links in the text link to various contextualized Learning Lab collections:

·    Historically Black University links to http://learninglab.si.edu/q/r/...

·    Abolitionist links to http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...

·    Harriet Beecher Stowe links to http://learninglab.si.edu/q/r/...

·    Brown v. Board links to http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...

Le'Passion Darby
63
 

Music to Protest By

A collection of resources showing how music instilled a sense of protest
Kevin Hodgson
12
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Laura Nicosia
3
 

Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s

Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the United States during in the 1930's.

LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes
6
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

ACCESS SERIES | Through the Lens of Curiosity

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

All Access Club Explores the Microscopic World. If you cannot see something, does that mean that it is not there? Nope! Just lurking under the surface of common, everyday objects is an entire world that we normally cannot see. People just like you can use microscopes to discover things that need magnification in order to view.  The collection is part of an activity series that explores this mysterious microscopic world.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Through the Lens of Curiosity"  << CLICK HERE >>

In this collection you will:

  • Find out about the world through the use of microscopes and magnifiers
  • Take on the role of detective as you embark on a quest to solve 5 mysteries -- by making observations about up-close objects and reading clues, can you figure out what the whole object is?
  • In the game A Part of the Whole, use your power of observation to consider the structures and functions of up-close objects to guess what they might be. Again, you will look at part of an object--photographed up-close--to guess at the whole.

If it is possible to set-up a hand's-on experience with microscopes along with the online activities -- the tactile portion will enhance the online activity. Teens can also view a video about scanning electron microscopes by a young scientist in the 'extension section'.

Keywords: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program 

Tracie Spinale
64
 

ACCESS SERIES | Galaxy Quest

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

Have you ever wondered what's going on out there in the universe? Would you like to discover exciting things about planets, stars, and galaxies? Today, we will go on a GALAXY QUEST to EXPLORE THE UNIVERSE!

RATIONALE | Digital technology has transformed how we explore the Universe. We now have the ability to peer into space right from our homes and laptop computers. Telescopes, photography, and spectroscopy remain the basic tools that scientists—astronomers and cosmologists—use to explore the universe, but digital light detectors and powerful computer processors have enhanced these tools. Observatories in space—like the Hubble Space Telescope—have shown us further into space then we have ever seen before.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Galaxy Quest" << CLICK HERE >>

Lesson Objectives:
1. Process and save at least one digital image of a galaxy or space image (with caption)
2. Create a three-dimensional astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
3. Create a digital astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
4. Visit the Explore the Universe exhibition at NASM and identify Hubble parts (mirror, lens, spectroscope)

Learning Objectives:
1.     What a galaxy is
2.     What a space telescope is
3.     Learn how to open an image on the computer and process it
4.     Socialize well in the museum setting


Tags: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program 


Tracie Spinale
77
 

ACCESS SERIES | Nile, Nile Crocodile

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

Exploring: Ancient Egypt, the Nile River, and glass museum objects, papercraft, and sand art

Rationale for Instruction:

  • Through the introduction, museum visit, and activities, students connect with an ancient and diverse culture in ways both conceptual and concrete. The ancient Egyptians shaped our modern civilization in fundamental ways and left legacies that are still present today. 

Objectives:

  • Explain features of the daily life of an Ancient Egyptian living on the Nile River, including boat transportation, dress, and animal life. 
  • Explore the ancient origins of glass making in Egypt.
  • Examine how glass making relates to object making, animal representation, and the desert environment of Egypt
  • Plan, create, and share digital and physical works of art that represent ancient (sand art) and modern art forms (digital photography with filters) as well as representational art (papercraft) landscape.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Nile, Nile Crocodile" << CLICK HERE >>

SET THE STAGE:

  • Maps - Look at the maps in the Smithsonian collection; Where do you think you'll journey to in this collection?
  • "This is Sand" App - an tablet app that changes the pixels on the screen into digital sand.
  • Video about The Nile (for learners who prefer a concrete example)
  • Thought journey down the Nile River; Ask questions about observations along the way. If you are able to transform the furniture to reflect a boat, do so. 
  • Glass making video as well as a primary source text from 1904 (for learners who prefer a concrete example); Help make the connection between the desert sand environment and glass making. 

MUSEUM "VISIT"

  • Go to the gallery; read the panels and explore the objects. The gallery has been re-created in the Learning Lab collection
  • Explore the glass vessels-->What do you notice?
  • Observe the glass animals-->Take turns reading the informational texts; What do the animals represent?

~ BREAK ~

ACTIVITY STATIONS (rotate between activity stations)

  • SAND ART - Create your own ancient Egyptian glass vessel through a sand art design similar to the decorated glass in the museum.
  • "ANCIENT" PHOTOS - Use digital tablets to take photos in a museum gallery and use the built-in filters to create 'ancient-looking' photos like the ones that document historic museum excavations. 
  • PAPERCRAFT LANDSCAPE - Create a three-dimensional landscape of ancient Egypt based on the animals and structures observed in the museum gallery and in the introductory materials. Templates and examples are included. Document your results using photography.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
120
 

Alaskan History

In this collection I will go over some of the main points in Alaskan history.

Nairn Davis
10
 

Early America

Dianna Dineen
3
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? Protest

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? PROTEST, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? PROTEST invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What would you do to support what you believe in? 

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

NMAH Education
14
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? VOTING

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? VOTING, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? VOTING invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What does voting mean to you?

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

NMAH Education
29
 

Frankenstein 200 RB copy

Collection on Frankenstein related resources for the 200th anniversary of the publication of the novel by Mary Shelley... as a sandbox for getting me acquainted with SLL and this project...

Rebecca Boggs
28
 

Flashcard Activity: Conflict, Identity, and Place in American Art

This collection contains a selection of artworks related to the themes of conflict, identity, and place.  They may be used for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:

  1. Why did you pick this artwork?  
  2. What do you see?  Name specific aspects of the artwork you notice.
  3. What do you think about what you see?
  4. What does this artwork make you wonder? 
  5. Optional: How might the artwork connect to the themes of conflict, identity, and place?

This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile).  You may also replace or pair the above activity with a Project Zero Thinking Routine found in the final section of the collection. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains artwork selected by Phoebe Hillemann, Teacher Institutes Educator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, to be featured in the 2018 Smithsonian American Art Museum Summer Institute for Teachers, "Teaching the Humanities through Art."  The activity is adapted from Project Zero's See / Think / Wonder routine (see the resource tile).

Keywords: printable, flash card, project zero visible thinking routine, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, NJPSA, saam

Tess Porter
51
 

Transcendentalism and National Parks

These visuals and supplementary materials are meant to augment a much larger American Literature unit (for grade 11) that covers Transcendentalism and authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Frederick Law Olmsted.  This unit usually takes seven (7) 55-minute class periods.  I also utilize the first episode of Ken Burns's National Parks:  America's Best Idea.  

#SAAMteach

Cara Lane
6
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