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1958 Banana Plant Research Station - Costa Rica

Human Studies Film Archives
Banana Plant Research Station (Costa Rica) (1958): Coto (crop) Research Station; displays healthy banana plant and a diseased banana plant -- SILENT FILM CLIP This film clip is from Thayer Soule's travelogue, "Rainbow Lands of Central America", archived in the Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution. For more information, view the complete catalog record: http://tinyurl.com/HSFAcatalog. For information on Thayer Soule see SIRIS blog post: http://tinyurl.com/qyn6fkd.

Science Olympiad Reach for the Stars Event 2016 Part3

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Day 12: Ajo Curaçao

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #3

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond, Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.3.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with a wide shot of men cheering from a covered grandstand at a homecoming football game. This is followed by pan shots of finely dressed women standing in a line and seated men cheering for the camera. Subsequently, there are wide shots of the football team warming up and of the game itself. Next, there are multiple shots of the Tuskegee marching band performing on the football field. The camera then shoots a man speaking to the crowd. This is followed by more shots of the marching band and the football game. The film then cuts to scenes from a ceramics class. There are multiple shots of ceramic objects and a close up of a bust of Booker T. Washington being sculpted. The following scene depicts children in a classroom with wide shots of the children and a teacher seated in a circle and multiple portrait-style shots of the children and teachers. Next, a weaving class is shown with wide shots of a loom in operation and students showing off objects they've made in the class. This is followed by multiple shots of a cooking class where a teacher is training students in various techniques. The next several shots are out of focus, but appear to depict people formally entering a room. The film ends with multiple shots from a funeral with both wide and portrait-style shots of the mourners.

2016.16.3.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #16

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: Super 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Box (c).

2016.31.3.16.1a: Super 8mm film. The film contains a series of shots depicting various tourist sites in Rome, Italy and Vatican City. Included are the Trevi Fountain and St. Peter's Square and Basilica. Additionally, there are multiple shots depicting street life from a balcony in an unidentified location.

2016.31.3.16.1b: Original film reel.

2016.31.3.16.1c: Original film box. Standard yellow Kodachrome Super 8mm film box with brief handwritten content notes.

Hazel Dickens performs "West Virginia, My Home"

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Hazel Dickens became an accomplished bluegrass performer at a time when the genre was dominated by men. She is also an admired advocate for women's and worker's rights. Along with fellow musician and friend Alice Gerrard, she empowered countless female singers and musicians to succeed without sacrificing integrity. In this performance, Dickens, herself the eighth of eleven children born to a West Virginia mining family, pays homage to her home state. [Catalog No. - CFV10052; Copyright - 2006 Smithsonian Institution]

Reboot the Suit: Halfway to Launch

National Air and Space Museum
We've made it to the halfway mark of our very first Kickstarter project to conserve, digitize, and display Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 spacesuit. At $250,000, and growing, we're over the Moon with joy. Thank you and please keep sharing #RebootTheSuit. Learn more: airandspace.si.edu/rebootthesuit

Science Olympiad Reach for the Stars Event 2017 Part 5

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Reflections on the Greensboro Lunch Counter

National Museum of American History
Civil Rights activists Joseph McNeil, Diane Nash, and John Lewis reflect on the history and legacy of the lunch counter from the F. W. Woolworth department store in North Carolina and the sit-in campaign that began on February 1, 1960. Racial segregation was still legal in the United States on February 1, 1960, when four African American college students sat down at this Woolworth counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. Politely asking for service at this “whites only” counter, their request was refused. When asked to leave, they remained in their seats. Their sit-in drew national attention and helped ignite a youth-led movement to challenge inequality throughout the South. In Greensboro, hundreds of students, civil rights organizations, churches, and members of the community joined in a six-month-long protest. Their commitment ultimately led to the desegregation of the F. W. Woolworth lunch counter on July 25, 1960. Ezell A. Blair Jr. (now Jibreel Khazan), Franklin E. McCain, Joseph A. McNeil, and David L. Richmond were students enrolled at the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College when they began their protest. Protests such as this led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which finally outlawed racial segregation in public accommodations. The closing of the Greensboro Woolworth's in 1993 presented Museum curators with the opportunity to acquire this historic artifact. After extensive negotiations with Woolworth's executives and representatives of the local community, a small section of the lunch counter was donated to the Smithsonian.

Why This Plane Collision Was Impossible to Predict

Smithsonian Channel
Control personnel couldn't detect the fatal crash between Airwest Flight 706 and an F-4 fighter jet. Could radar malfunction be to blame? From: AIR DISASTERS: Speed Trap http://bit.ly/1B5uz9N

1972 Kotor

Human Studies Film Archives
SILENT FILM CLIP (3:57 minutes)--1972 Kotor, Montenegro (former Yugoslavia): Budva Hotel, beach, Stari Bar, street scenes, market, donkeys, village of Cilipi, Croatia, and procession. This film clip is from Thayer Soule's 1972 travelogue, "Yugoslavia", archived in the Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution. For more information, view the catalog record: http://tinyurl.com/pnzse5t For information on Thayer Soule see SIRIS blog post http://tinyurl.com/qyn6fkd

The Devastating 1926 Hurricane that Halted the Growth of Miami

Smithsonian Channel
In 1926, the Miami economy was soaring, fueled by wealthy northerners attracted to the tropical climate and beaches. But a devastating hurricane would smash into the city, causing widespread destruction. From the Series: America In Color: The 1920s http://bit.ly/1920sinColor

Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-135 Astronauts

National Air and Space Museum
The STS-135 crew landed Space Shuttle "Atlantis" for the last time July 21, 2011, after a successful mission to deliver supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. Here the crew discusses what it was like to participate in the final flight of the space shuttle program. This presentation was recorded on Thursday, October 13 in the "Moving Beyond Earth" gallery of the National Air and Space Museum.

SSEP Day 2 - El Paso, TX (Team 2)

National Air and Space Museum
The first Student Spaceflight Experiment Program (SSEP) National Conference was held at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum on July 6 and 7, 2011. This student science symposium allowed student teams from all over the country to share their designs and preliminary results for experiments conducted during STS-134, Space Shuttle Endeavour's final mission. This video includes the presentation: "Antimicrobial Effect of Honey on Escherichia Coli Growth in Microgravity" by El Paso Community College, El Paso, TX.

Sand Creek Massacre: 01 Welcome and Blessing

National Museum of the American Indian
Sand Creek Massacre: 150 Year Remembrance, jointly sponsored by the National Park Service and the National Museum of the American Indian, is a one day symposium that commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Sand Creek Massacre - a tragedy that occurred on November 29,1864. In this segment, José Barriero, Assistant Director of Research at the National Museum of the American Indian, along with Alexa Roberts, Superintendent, Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, welcome the symposium attendees. Henrietta Mann, President of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College, offers a blessing.

"I grew up coming here since I could walk"

National Museum of Natural History
Recorded onsite at NMNH's Centennial exhibit.

Why Design Now?: SunShade

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Why? SunShade is an outdoor solar floor lamp. With solar cells embedded in the canopy and acting as sensors, the umbrella opens and closes automatically like a real flower in relation to the shifting sun. During the day, the SunShade opens to provide shade and harness sunlight, and as the sun goes down, the parasol contracts into a glowing lamp.

Science Olympiad Webinar 09

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Elizabeth McCormack, "Ion-pair states in ungerade molecular hydrogen"

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Elizabeth McCormack, Bryn Mawr College, during the workshop of "Heavy Rydberg Physics", lecture titled "Ion-pair states in ungerade molecular hydrogen", at the Institute for Theoretical, Atomic and Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts on May 11-12, 2012. © Harvard University and Elizabeth McCormack. The text and images on ITAMP's YouTube channel are intended for public access and educational use. This material is owned or held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. It is being provided solely for the purpose of teaching or individual research or enrichment. Any other use, including commercial reuse, mounting on other systems, or other forms of redistribution requires permission. ITAMP is supported through grants by the National Science Foundation Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s).

Episode 7 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Sophie Rivera

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at two untitled photographs by Sophie Rivera http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80106 http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80107 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Fiji Vesi Tagitagi Music Ensemble

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Catalog No. - CFV10276; Copyright - 2010 Smithsonian Institution

Leon Sanche, "Low energy electron resonances and dielectric hysteresis....

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Leon Sanche (Sherbrooke), Title of talk ""Low energy electron resonances and dielectric hysteresis phenomena in van der Waals solids", during FANO Memorial Symposium, "Resonances and Reflections: Profiles of Ugo Fano's Physics and Its Influences", held July 24, 2002 at The Institute for Theoretical, Atomic and Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts. © Harvard University and Leon Sanche. The text and images on ITAMP's YouTube channel are intended for public access and educational use. This material is owned or held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. It is being provided solely for the purpose of teaching or individual research or enrichment. Any other use, including commercial reuse, mounting on other systems, or other forms of redistribution requires permission. ITAMP is supported through grants by the National Science Foundation Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s).

Taj Mahal circa 1950

Human Studies Film Archives
A silent color film sequence of the Taj Mahal c. 1950, taken by Catherine Ulstrom, an author, illustrator, and filmmaker who chronicled the work of Christian missionaries in leper colonies around the world. The Taj Mahal was recently named one of the "New Seven Wonders of the World." The film clip is from the Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution collection of historical moving images.

The Awe-Inspiring Monument Rocks

Smithsonian Channel
Eighty million years ago, western Kansas was underwater; the remains of what lived in the sea then turned into chalk, eventually eroding into the large rocks that now tower over the flat countryside. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Kansas http://bit.ly/1nuFe9J
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