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How the Pacemaker Developed from an Everyday Radio

Smithsonian Channel
When Wilson Greatbatch invented the pacemaker, he was fulfilling a promise he'd made to God: keep him alive during WWII, and he'd dedicate his life to helping others. From: MY MILLION DOLLAR INVENTION: Life and Death http://bit.ly/1HvBteB

Living Earth Festival 2018: Day 1 Panel Discussion

National Museum of the American Indian
The ninth annual Living Earth Festival focuses on sustainable development through heritage tourism, traditional agricultural practices, and the importance of Native foods and food sovereignty. The festival's first panel discussion is titled "Invitation to Indian Country: Tourism in Packerland and Indian Territory." Panelists Cheryl Trask (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), Gilbert Johnston (Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma), and Kyle Wisneski (Oneida Nation of Wisconsin) talk about how their communities use tourism to educate visitors and provide tribal citizens, surrounding communities, and their states with a source of economic development. Camille Ferguson (Tlingit/Sitka), executive director of the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association, moderates the discussion. The panel discussion was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on July 20, 2018.

Is This Scene from Die Hard Really Possible?

Smithsonian Channel
The hallmark of every Die Hard movie is John McClane's ability to get out of the most dangerous situations with the minimum of effort - often using the most unlikely props. From: THE REAL STORY: Live Free or Die Hard http://bit.ly/1lsT1fT

The Crab Nebula in 60 Seconds

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
In 1054 A.D., a star's death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth. Now, almost a thousand years later, a superdense neutron star left behind by the explosion is spewing out a blizzard of extremely high-energy particles into the expanding debris field known as the Crab Nebula.

​Why Do Sea Lions Bark?

Smithsonian Channel
If you're near a sea lion, chances are you'll hear its distinctive bark before you see it. Here, caretakers at Smithsonian's National Zoo explain why they make these sounds and what they're trying to say. From: WILD INSIDE THE NATIONAL ZOO: Sea Mammal Smarts http://bitly.com/1MFXaaJ

Behind the Scenes with Project PHaEDRA Step 1

Smithsonian Institution
Want to learn more about how the Project Phaedra collections--including all the notebooks from the Women Glass Computers--from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics get processed, cataloged, digitized, and ultimately imported into the Transcription Center for volunpeers to work on? Check out this video--the first in a new behind-the-scenes series- from Project Phaedra Staff. Want to learn more? email us anytime at transcribe@si.edu.

Meet the Team Doing Groundbreaking Evolutionary Research

Smithsonian Channel
To effectively gather data about native flycatchers, Solomon Islands-based biologist Albert Uy must rely on the help of local guides, as well as his own wife. They make quite a team. From: ISLANDS OF CREATION" http://bit.ly/1G9IDmO

Vesta's Surface Comes Into View

National Air and Space Museum
This movie from NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA shows a dark feature near the equator of the giant asteroid Vesta moving from left to right across the field of view as Vesta rotates. It is roughly 100 kilometers (60 miles) in diameter. The 20 frames of the movie (repeated 5 times here) were obtained by NASA's Dawn spacecraft for navigation purposes on June 1, 2011.

Star Stories: Itcohorucika and His Brothers

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Ho-Chunk story of jealous brothers and good brothers, who are really stars. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Incredible Timelapse of Dry Badlands Thunderstorm

Smithsonian Channel
In South Dakota, thousands of fireflies, in the midst of a mating ritual, compete against the bright stars that light up the dark skies of the Badlands. Often, it's hard to tell one from the other. From the Show: America's Badlands http://bit.ly/2A2oNv6

Imagining a Re-Oriented Future in Chicago’s 10th District

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
This video is featured in the exhibition 'By the People: Designing a Better America,' on view at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum September 2016–February 2017. Learn more at /www.cooperhewitt.org/channel/by-the-people. By Sarah Williams, Laurie Rubel, Erica Deahl, Valeria Mogilevich. Courtesy of Courtesy of Studio Gang. THIS VIDEO HAS NO SOUND.

3-D Visualization of Cassiopeia A

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
A research team has released a unique look of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). By combining data from Chandra, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and ground- based optical observations, astronomers have been able to construct the first three-dimensional fly-through of a supernova remnant. This visualization (shown here as a still image) was made possible by importing the data into a medical imaging program that has been adapted for astronomical use. The green region shown in the image is mostly iron observed in X-rays; the yellow region is mostly argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical and infrared and the red region is cooler debris seen in the infrared. The positions of these points in three-dimensional space were found by using the Doppler effect and simple assumptions about the supernova explosion.

The Top of Her Class

Smithsonian Channel
Meet the M.V. Solitaire, the world's biggest and fastest pipe-layer. Will she still be able to smoke the competition on her toughest assignment yet? From the Series: Mighty Ships: M.V. Solitaire http://bit.ly/2yRMR5T

Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Behind the Scenes

Smithsonian Channel
Our film crew recreates the glamorous life of socialite Evalyn Walsh McLean. The one-time owner of the Hope Diamond was rumored to occasionally display the Hope Diamond on the neck of her Great Dane. From: MYSTERY OF THE HOPE DIAMOND http://bit.ly/1jTQ1t4

SSEP 2012 - Jim Zimbelman

National Air and Space Museum
The second annual Student Spaceflight Experiment Program (SSEP) National Conference was held at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum on July 2 and 3, 2012. This student science symposium allowed student teams from all over the country to share their designs and results for experiments conducted on the International Space Station. This video includes the presentation: "Artifacts of Planetary Robotic Exploration" by by Dr. James Zimbelman, Planetary Geologist, Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

This Train Hauls Fish Up a Mountain for a Living

Smithsonian Channel
The path of the North Rail Express from Norway to Sweden is a challenging one: starting at sea level, the train will have to climb 25 miles up into the mountains, weighed down with a heavy cargo of fresh fish. From the show Mighty Trains: http://bit.ly/2x9X8tT

Episode 7 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Sophie Rivera

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at two untitled photographs by Sophie Rivera http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80106 http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80107 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Aerial America - California: Sneak Peek

Smithsonian Channel
The most beautiful drive in California is even more stunning from the air. Travel along the edge of American culture, down the Pacific Coast Highway and through the Golden State with Aerial America. From the Series: Aerial America: California http://bit.ly/2yrnkjB

Director's Choice - The Sick Child by J. Bond Francisco

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Smithsonian American Art Museum Director Elizabeth Broun shares her thoughts about personal favorites from the museum collection. A few years ago when the museum considered buying this painting, called The Sick Child by J. Bond Francisco, some people thought the subject was just too sentimental, too Victorian and schmaltzy. We acquired it anyway because in the early 20th century, it was one of the most famous American paintings anywhere. The artist kept it in his studio until he died, in 1931, but thousands of reproductions had been made of it and displayed in doctors' offices all across the country. The Sick Child was familiar to every parent who ever had a desperately ill child.

Warthog on the Run

Smithsonian Channel
When the lions get hungry, they go after the only prey available, one unlucky warthog. From: WHEN LIONS ATTACK http://bit.ly/1p76sOD

Design Imitates Life - James Korris

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
James Korris' work is at the forefront of creative visualization in national defense technologies. He came to the defense industry following working Hollywood studio production, producing and writing.

Why Deception Valley's Deadly Heat is Good for Wildlife

Smithsonian Channel
The harsh climate of Deception Valley, a remote section of the Kalahari, deters people from living there. As a result, it's become one of the most pristine wildlife habitats in the world. From the Series: Aerial Africa: Botswana http://bit.ly/2IMeONw

Vantage Point : Rosalie Favell - If only you could love me ...

National Museum of the American Indian
In her intimate portraits, Rosalie Favell (Cree Métis, b. 1958) confronts issues of gender, sexuality, and race through the use of imagery drawn from popular culture and family photo albums. Her work "If only you could love me..." (2003) refers to Frida Kahlo's 1940 painting "Self Portrait with Cropped Hair," complicating its questions of gender and sexuality and injecting issues of mixed-race identity and historical conflict. The image calls to mind both the cutting of hair in times of mourning and historic photographs of Native American children at boarding schools, where they were dressed in suits and their long hair was cut short. Favell's work is featured in "Vantage Point: The Contemporary Native Art Collection," on view through August 7, 2011 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.
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