User Image

Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Getting to Know You: Icebreaker Ideas with the Smithsonian Learning Lab

<p>This collection includes ideas for using digital museum resources as a springboard for getting to know your students this school year. Three practical, teacher-tested activity ideas are shared within the archived webinar and an additional teacher-submitted idea is included. </p> <p><em>Tags</em>: ISTE standards, digital curation, icebreakers, ice breakers, object portraits, Burton Morris, Robert Weingarten, first day of school, CURIO, artifacts, introductions, knowledge constructor, creative communicator, My Smithsonian Closet, Nightstand Portraits, What makes you who you are?</p>
Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Forensic Anthropology Case: Discovering Jane

Teaching guide introducing a forensic case file from 2012, when Jamestown archaeologists excavated fragments of a human skull and leg bone dating to the winter of 1609-1610. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History. <br /> (<a href="http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/Jane.html">http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/Jane.html</a> )<br />
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Exploring Simple Machines and the Complexities of Rube Goldberg Inventions

<p>This collection explores the concept of Rube Goldberg inventions and their use of multi-step processes to complete an action. Often Rube Goldberg inventions utilize a series of simple machines to cause a chain reaction for a task. Using an image of a comic that features one such invention, students can analyze the parts, purposes and complexities of the object and its processes. Additional resources are included to support the further exploration of these inventions and the identification of the simple machines (levers, pulleys, wedges, screws, wheels, axles and inclined planes). </p> <p>This collection complements an in-person visit to the <em>Rube Goldberg™: The World of Hilarious Invention! Exhibit</em> at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.</p> <p>#PZPGH</p>
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Exploring Our Planet through Satellite Images

Resources supporting the March 2016 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, including a resource list compiled by Dr. Steven H. Williams, Chief of STEM Engagement at NASM.
Ashley Naranjo
45
 

English Language Learning with Artifacts and Portraits

This collection for teachers brings together relevant learning resources and an archived webinar (collaboration between the Smithsonian and American English "Shaping the Way We Teach English" webinars from the U.S. Department of State). It includes a webinar with three educators from the National Museum of American History, National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. During the webinar, strategies are explored for engaging students in looking at and analyzing portraits, as well as eliciting thoughtful questions about objects that help tell a story. The webinar also features an emphasis on how visuals, such as collection objects, photographs, artworks and videos with experts, can serve as a springboard for rich discussions and inspire curiosity in the classroom and beyond.
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Creating a Virtual Gallery using Smithsonian Digital Assets

<p>In spring of 2018, Stuart Richardson, a graduating senior at William J. Palmer High School in Colorado Springs, CO created a virtual reality experience, based on freely accessible digital assets from the Smithsonian. Read more about Richardson's experience via the Smithsonian Learning Lab blog: <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/news/step-inside-a-student-curated-gallery">https://learninglab.si.edu/news/step-inside-a-student-curated-gallery</a></p> <p>The gallery includes 3D and 2D assets, including: </p> <ul><li><a href="https://3d.si.edu/explorer/abraham-lincoln-mills-life-mask">https://3d.si.edu/explorer/abraham-lincoln-mills-life-mask</a> </li><li><a href="https://3d.si.edu/explorer/andrew-jackson-zinc-sculpture">https://3d.si.edu/explorer/andrew-jackson-zinc-sculpture</a> </li><li><a href="https://3d.si.edu/explorer/rutherford-b-hayes-plaster-bust">https://3d.si.edu/explorer/rutherford-b-hayes-plaster-bust</a> </li></ul><p><strong>Keywords:</strong> presidents, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Jackson, Rutherford B. Hayes, sculpture, plaster bust, life mask, Civil War, student work</p>
Ashley Naranjo
14
 

Conflict, Identity, and Place in American Art (2019)

<p>This collection contains a selection of artworks related to the themes of conflict, identity, and place.  Teachers can use these artworks for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion, with an extended version of <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/resources/view/1056333" target="_blank">Project Zero's See, Think, Wonder</a> thinking routine.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:</p> <ol><li>Why did you pick this artwork?  </li><li>What do you <em>see</em>?  Name specific aspects of the artwork you notice.</li><li>What do you <em>think </em>about what you see?</li><li>What does this artwork make you <em>wonder</em>? </li><li><em>Optional</em>: How might the artwork connect to the themes of conflict, identity, and place?</li></ol><p> </p> <p>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains artwork selected by <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/profile/666" style="background-color:rgb(63,63,63);">Phoebe Hillemann</a>, Teacher Institutes Educator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, featured in the 2019 Smithsonian American Art Museum Summer Institute for Teachers, "Teaching the Humanities through Art."  <br /></p> <p>These artworks serve as foundational museum resources in lesson concepts that are accessible by searching the Smithsonian Learning Lab with the hashtag: #SAAMTeach.</p>
Ashley Naranjo
40
 

Conducting an Oral History: Tips from Across the Smithsonian

<p><strong>Oral history</strong> is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information – primary source material – from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. This collection includes tips for conducting your own oral history from a student journalist and a historian, guides with suggestions for setting up your own interview, and recorded oral histories from key moments documenting a range of events in 20th century history. </p> <p>Recommended questions to consider with this collection of resources: <em>What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding historic events?  </em><em>How do oral histories compare to other sources of information? </em><em>How can what we learn in school help us understand and process the experience of today, in the context of history? </em><em>What is our responsibility to document, reflect, and advocate? </em></p>
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Athletes and Aviators: Women Who Shaped History

<p>This topical collection includes resources related to featured women athletes and aviators. This collection includes portraits of the athletes and aviators, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the women's life stories, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.  <br /></p> <p>Keywords: Bessie Coleman, Pancho Barnes, Babe Zaharias, Billie Jean King, Florence Griffith Joyner ("Flo Jo"), Ibtihaj Muhammad, #BecauseOfHerStory<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
39
 

Astrophotography: Student Activity in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics)

In this student activity, you’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. After you analyze your own image(s), you’ll have an opportunity to research related astronomy information and to share your scientific and artistic interpretations of your telescope data.
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Asian Pacific Americans in the Performing Arts

<p>This topical collection includes resources about Asian Pacific American actors, choreographers, spoken word poets, musicians, composers, comedians, filmmakers, and stage performers. The collection includes portraits, videos and articles. </p> <p>Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Asian Pacific American representation in the performing arts. This collection is not comprehensive, but rather provides a launching point for research and study.  </p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em>  </p> <p>Keywords: entertainment, actress, magician, dancer, “Siamese twins”, entrepreneur, Moana, Mulan, Anna May Wong, Chinese American, George Takei, Japanese American, Michio Ito, Dana Tai Soon Burgess, Korean American, Regie Cabico, Filipino American, Yo Yo Ma, Aziz Anzari, Mindy Kaling, Indian American, Bruce Lee </p> <p>#APA2018<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
60