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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

An 11 year old's Letter and Lincoln's Beard

<p>This teaching collection includes videos, portraits and lesson plans from the National Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of American History. During Abraham Lincoln's campaign to become president, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote a letter suggesting he grow a beard to gain more votes. Of course, Lincoln's beard became iconic in imagery during his Presidency and throughout the Civil War.</p>
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Learning to Look: Letter from Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

<p>This collection includes student activities and learning to look questions, as well as additional teacher resources for extending the lesson. Students will use the primary sources to understand the changing perspectives and perceptions of Japanese Americans in the World War II era.</p> <p>Keywords: Japanese Incarceration, George Biddle, Franklin D. Roosevelt, WW2, WWII, analysis, written response, essay, text, Max Yavno, Pearl Harbor, Works Progress Administration (WPA)</p> <p>#APA2018 #EthnicStudies</p> <p><em>#historicalthinking</em></p> <p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
12
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Student Activity: Music as an Environmental Advocacy Approach

<p>In this student activity, explore five musical artists and their connections to environmental advocacy as shared by a Smithsonian Folkways archivist. Inspired by these songs about water issues, you will write lyrics for a song on an environmental theme, incorporating relevant words and imagery.</p><p>#SmithsonianMusic<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Climate Change Online Conference Series: Archive and Related Teaching Resources

This online conference series invites educators and students to explore Smithsonian research and collections related to the evidence, impact, and response to climate change. Smithsonian curators and researchers explore the evidence of climate change, as well as the impact of climate change on the environment, wildlife, biodiversity, and human populations. Smithsonian experts also lead discussions on how people are responding to the threats posed by climate change. Includes the archive of each session, with teacher-created suggested lessons that utilize Visual Thinking Strategies. Original Airdates: Fall 2009 <br /><br />
Ashley Naranjo
25
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

Teaching Resources: Jazz Music

<p>This teaching collection includes a variety of resources to complement a study of Jazz compositions and performers. Through these lesson plans, sheet music, artworks, and video performances, teachers can introduce the musical evolution of jazz styles and contributions of key performers. Teachers might also introduce musical techniques involved in the creation and performance of jazz.<br /><br /><br />This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.</p><p>#SmithsonianMusic<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

An Introduction to Origami Paper Folding

In this activity, students will be introduced to the art of origami paper folding by learning how this tradition has been passed down through generations from an interview with an artisan and how to make an origami paper crane from a fellow student.
Ashley Naranjo
4
 

An Introduction to Hawai'ian Lei Making

All Polynesians have a history of making and giving of lei. From early times, Hawaiians have fashioned lei from shells, seeds, bone, and feathers and from more temporary materials such as leaves, vines, and a few indigenous flowers. Colorful flowers and greenery are braided, twisted, wrapped, or strung together to create lei for the neck, head, wrists and ankles. Lei are made and given for marriages, birthdays, luaus, and funerals. Leis are also given on informal occasions to express gratitude or warmth of friendship. In this collection, you’ll learn how to make your own lei and explore other examples of leis made from a variety of natural materials.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Teaching Resources: Creating a Classroom Exhibition

In a museum, it is the job of curators to select objects for display. Curators also study the objects in the museum’s collection. They learn as much as they can about each object so that they can share the story with the museum’s visitors. This collection of teaching resources includes lesson plan ideas for creating a classroom exhibition, a video detailing the Cooper Hewitt's "Digital Curator Project" with teens, as well as a small sample of videos of curators from around the Smithsonian discussing their jobs and research interests. Also included are suggested guidelines for a peer review of student exhibitions.
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Student Activity: Curious Curator

In this student activity, you’ll pick an object to represent your family history, the history of your community, or your own personal history. You will study the object as a museum curator would study it—as an artifact, an object with historical importance. You will first document the object in photographs, as museum curators usually do. Then you will write a label for the object, as if it were a piece on display in a museum. Finally, you will try to “think” like your object. You will write a story from the object’s point of view—as if the object itself were speaking. You might be surprised by what it says!
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

The Brown Sisters: Forty Years in Forty Portraits

This collection includes a unique series of portraits of four sisters. Every year, for forty years, one of the sisters' husbands captured the four women in a black and white photograph. A New York Times article introduces the project, paired with the forty photographs and some discussion questions considering elements of portraiture that are captured in these images.
Ashley Naranjo
43