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Jasmine Kassulke

Design and Technology teacher
Marsden State High School, Queensland Australia.
Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Researcher, Museum Staff
Arts, Other :

Jasmine Kassulke's collections

 

Human-Centred Design

<p>This learning lab collection is for students and teachers to access tools and resources specific to Human Centred Design. </p> <p>In this learning lab, students learn about and experience designing in the context of human-centred design (HCD). Fundamental to HCD is the principle that a designer considers human needs and wants as a higher priority than other influences throughout the design process. The success of a design depends on effectively considering the attitudes, expectations, motivations and experiences of humans. Designers use observations, interviews and experiences to acquire data about people and seek to avoid making assumptions about their needs and wants.</p> <p> Students will use designing with empathy as an approach to define problems by understanding and experiencing the needs and wants of stakeholders. Students interact with stakeholders throughout the process. Ideas and design concepts are evaluated throughout the process using feedback from stakeholders to determine suitability.</p>
Jasmine Kassulke
29
 

Low-Fidelity Prototyping: Products

<p>A prototype is an experimental model of an idea. It is a way to give our ideas a presence that we can put in front of someone else to see if our idea has value. It is important to match the fidelity of the prototype to the stage of the design process. At the beginning we want to use low-fidelity prototypes. Low-Fidelity prototyping refers to rapid prototyping from cheap, readily available materials. At this stage we are testing broad concepts such as materials, forms, usability. </p> <p>This learning lab collection documents low-fidelity prototyping techniques, activities and student work for use by teachers and students. At the end of this learning lab collection you will find examples of prototyping directly from the design industry as well as video tutorials.  </p> <p>After you explore this learning lab collection you will be ready to embark on your own prototyping adventures. </p> <p><br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Jasmine Kassulke
35
 

Drawing for Design

<p>Drawing is a powerful tool that designers use to explore, represent and develop their design ideas into concepts. When we represent ideas throughout the design process, we use visualisation tools and techniques such as schematic sketching, thumbnail sketching, ideation sketching and illustration sketching. </p> <p> In this learning lab you will explore a variety of drawing visualisation techniques that you can use in your design process. </p> <p>Learning Goals:</p> <ul><li>Understand the purpose of drawing in the design process</li> <li>Explore design drawings of products, services and environments </li> <li>Analyse different drawing styles, how they are applicable to different design disciplines and stages of the design process</li> <li>Decide how to differentiate between critical and non-critical elements when representing ideas.</li></ul>
Jasmine Kassulke
74
 

Prototyping: Built Environment

<p>A prototype is an experimental model of an idea. It is a way to give our ideas a presence that we can put in front of someone else to see if our idea has value. It is important to match the fidelity of the prototype to the stage of the design process. At the beginning we want to use low-fidelity prototypes. Low-Fidelity prototyping refers to rapid prototyping from cheap, readily available materials. At this stage we are testing broad concepts such as materials, forms, usability. </p> <p>This learning lab collection documents low-fidelity prototyping objects, techniques, activities and examples specific to Built Environment Design (Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture). This collection is designed for use by students, teachers and parents. After you explore this learning lab collection you will be ready to embark on your own prototyping adventures.</p> <p>Learning Goals:</p> <ul><li>Understand the materials used in low-fidelity prototyping </li><li>Identify ways that designers gain inspiration for design ideas by exploring designed objects</li><li>Consider how ideas can be represented, tested and iterated using prototypes  </li><li>Understand and explore techniques to create low-fidelity prototypes</li><li>Consider how prototypes are used at various stages of the design process </li></ul>
Jasmine Kassulke
29
 

DESIGN: Reflection Title Cards

<p>Use these title cards when creating learning lab collections to help categorise parts of your collection. These will assist with understanding the context for the content being displayed and prompt the direction of learning.  </p>
Jasmine Kassulke
13
 

Technological Evolution

<p>Our rapidly developing world has lead to unprecedented evolutions in technology. Technology tells a continuous narrative of innovation, disruption, collaboration, risk and resilience. Through this collection students explore the essential questions: <strong>What makes something innovative? How do you define innovation?</strong></p> <p>To help unpack these questions have students explore each object by answering:</p> <ul><li>Who is this object made for?</li><li>How is it used?</li><li>What did this object allow people to do? </li><li>What connections do you notice between the objects?</li><li>Was this technology innovative for its time? Why/Why not?  </li></ul><p>This collection was inspired by the Bob Greenberg Selects exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum: <a href="https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/1108968917/page1">https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/1108968917/page1</a></p>
Jasmine Kassulke
36