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Kate Harris

Learning Lab Coordinator
Smithsonian Institution
Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator
Language Arts And English, Civics, Literature, Cultures, Economics, Social Studies, Geography, Writing, US History, Arts, Other :

I'm a history-lover, art fan, and bookworm. I taught high school history (U.S. History and World Religions) for ten years in North Carolina, teach currently in Pittsburgh, PA,  and am working to help teachers make the most of this new resource!


Kate Harris's collections

 

The End of World War I

This collection asks users to consider how unresolved issues from WWI may have led to the outbreak of war again in the 1930s. Included is a letter from a soldier on the end of the war, a summary of the Treaty of Versailles, a painting and a political cartoon. The collection asks students to evaluate the predictions about future wars made by the letter's author and then to evaluate how and why the Treaty of Versailles may have failed. Tags: World War I, Treaty of Versailles, League of Nations, armistice, interwar, World War I, Hitler
Kate Harris
5
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today. tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Kate Harris
6
 

Artifacts from the Battlefield: WWI

This is a collection of artifacts from World War I, including photographs, uniforms, and some surprising contributors. Students will watch a video to observe how a curator connects an object (in this case a woman's AFFW uniform) to the person who used it, and then choose three objects from the collection to study before sharing findings with other classmates. Students should think about the guiding questions below as they investigate the objects in the collection. Guiding questions: How was World War I different from wars that came before? What impact did technology have on the war? What kinds of threats did soldiers face during World War I? How did soldiers find comfort during World War I? How might the experience of World War I have influenced the culture and politics of the years following it?
Kate Harris
14
 

I Am a Man--We Are Human

This collection traces how a powerful phrase and its variations have been adopted by different voices in United States history. Questions to consider: -How is the phrase (and/or design of the original poster) used? How do the changes and adaptations it has undergone reflect different time periods and issues in United States history? -Why has the phrase "I am a Man" had such staying power? Alternately, why has "We Are Human" been adopted? -How do the above phrases reflect or reject concepts like "separateness," "personal identity," or "inclusion"? -Why do you think many artists are drawn to the phrase and design? Do you think the artists expect viewers to recognize the influence of the original work? Why or why not? -Why is the verb underlined? How would it change if another word were emphasized? -What other examples could be included in this collection? This collection focuses primarily on visual interpretations of the phrase. Can you think of literary or pop culture examples? Tags: Ernest Withers, Dread Scott, Ferguson, Abolition, Sojourner Truth, Memphis, sanitation workers, immigration reform, refugee crisis, Hank Willis Thomas, protest, sign, placard, broadside, civil rights
Kate Harris
9
 

The End of the Cold War

This teaching collection chronicles the events and people associated with the end of the Cold War. Suggested teaching strategies are embedded throughout. Guiding questions include: -Who started the "revolutions" of 1989--Gorbachev and his reforms? People in Eastern Europe? -Evaluate the roles of the United States and the Reagan and Bush administrations, as well as the changes within the Soviet Union, in bringing about the end of the Cold War. -Why did the Cold War end? -What were the costs of the Cold War, both human and material? -What are the legacies/lessons of the Cold War? -What uncertainties or questions remained as the Cold War came to a close? What would come to characterize the 'New World Order' that followed? Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Reagan, Gorbachev, glasnost, perestroika, revolution, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
21
 

Picturing the Civil Rights Movement--Photographs by Charles Moore

This learner resource includes a 26 minute documentary where Charles Moore explains the context of many of his most famous civil rights images. Then, students examine the images and think about the importance of photojournalism to the civil rights movement. Finally, students are presented with Andy Warhol's image based on a Charles Moore photograph and asked to consider why certain images remain culturally significant. Guiding questions for this collection include: -How does seeing visual images of news events affect one differently than reading about them? Why? -How did the photographs in this collection impact the outcome of the Civil Rights Movement? -What makes some images more compelling than others? -Does photojournalism have a similar impact today? Tags: photography, Civil Rights, Birmingham, MLK, Martin Luther King, Charles Moore, photos, black and white
Kate Harris
15
 

Sputnik: Scientific Advances, Public Perception, and Political Priorities in the Cold War

The Soviet launch of Sputnik did much more than simply send a satellite into space. The announcement that the USSR had successfully launched a satellite that orbited the Earth was used to dramatize Soviet scientific superiority and set into motion a series of actions and statements by U.S. politicians designed to manage the public's fears and prevent the United States from falling behind. Guiding questions: -When it comes to military strength, which is more important: reality or perception? -How do the sciences impact national defense? -Why was a space program considered important and necessary for both the Soviet Union and the United States? -How and why do foreign events impact domestic politics and culture? Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Space Race, Sputnik, Technology, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
21
 

Building the Berlin Wall

This teaching collection explores the Berlin crisis leading to the building of the Berlin Wall. It addresses the following guiding questions through primary/secondary sources and teaching suggestions: -Why was Berlin the center of crisis in between 1958-1961? -Why did the Soviet Union sanction the construction of the Berlin Wall? -Why did the United States allow it to happen? -How did the Wall affect the lives of East and West Berliners? -Does the end (no more crises in Berlin) justify the means (the Wall)? -How does this incident reflect the greater issues of the Cold War? Students will practice reading primary sources and analyzing multiple perspectives. Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Khruschev, Stalin, Berlin, Wall, Kennedy, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
17
 

My Nightstand

What you might find on my nightstand....
Kate Harris
7
 

The Remains at Pompeii

This is a collection of teaching resources that could be used to support a lesson on Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius as well as life in ancient Rome. Included are artworks picturing Pompeii, archaeological artifacts, and links to "street views" of the ruins as well as magazine articles on the topic. Some questions to consider are: -What can we learn about the life of ancient Romans from the ruins at Pompeii? -What are the strengths and weaknesses of learning from archaeological ruins? -Why have the ruins at Pompeii continued to fascinate people over time?
Kate Harris
12
 

Ancient Rome: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in ancient Rome. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating Roman life. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

Art in American History--ISTE Conference 2016

A collection of resources used for a mini-session at the ISTE Conference 2016. Includes strategies and resources for integrating art into an American History course, utilizing Harvard University & Project Zero's "Making Thinking Visible."
Kate Harris
11