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Kate Harris

Learning Lab Coordinator
Smithsonian Institution
Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator
Language Arts And English, Civics, Literature, Cultures, Economics, Social Studies, Geography, Writing, US History, Arts, Other :

I'm a history-lover, art fan, and bookworm. I taught high school history (U.S. History and World Religions) for ten years in North Carolina, teach currently in Pittsburgh, PA,  and am working to help teachers make the most of this new resource!


Kate Harris's collections

 

Coffee Break

The best selection of coffee makers, urns, and mugs to be found in the Smithsonian collection. The best thing about waking up...
Kate Harris
23
 

Civil Disobedience

<p>This is a topical collection on the concept of civil disobedience. Users are invited to explore the theme of civil disobedience through texts from Sophocles, Shelley, and Thoreau and a variety of images. </p><p>Questions to consider:</p><p>-Does civil disobedience pose a threat to society?</p><p>-What examples of civil disobedience are portrayed here? What are some other examples?</p><p>-What is the role of civil disobedience in today's society?</p><p>-Some people prefer the phrase "passive resistance" to "civil disobedience." Compare and contrast these two terms.</p><p>-How does one measure the success of an act of civil disobedience? Policy change? Public influence?</p><p>-What role does violence play in civil disobedience?</p><p>Tags: King, Gandhi, protest, Birmingham, Greensboro, suffrage, Boston Tea Party, Antigone, Masque of Anarchy, Tambo, nun, Randolph, civil rights, Mexican-American War, Goldman</p>
Kate Harris
17
 

What do Anthropologists Do?

There are a number of lesson plans devoted to anthropology available from the Smithsonian. This collection links to several of the best lessons and teaching resources and, where necessary, provides short summaries of what each are, so teachers can easily use them in their own classrooms. It is focused on lessons and resources appropriate for middle and high school classrooms. The last four resources reference the case of Ishi, originally described as "the last Yahi Indian," and an example of flaws in the early approach to anthropology. The Smithsonian housed his brain, which had been donated to science by the University of California, from 1917 to 2000, when it was repatriated to his tribe.
Kate Harris
18
 

Westinghouse: The Man and the Companies

This is a collection of teaching resources available on the topic of George Westinghouse as well as Westinghouse Electric Company (founded 1886) and its spinoffs (including the broadcasting company and nuclear energy company). Fun fact: During the 20th century, Westinghouse engineers and scientists were granted more than 28,000 US government patents, the third most of any company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westinghouse_Electric_Company#cite_note-2009profile-14)
Kate Harris
15
 

The Middle Ages: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in the Middle Ages. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

Remembering the Holocaust

This collection looks at the way artists have used art, literature, and architecture to memorialize the victims of the Holocaust and explores the questions around how an artistic work, memorial, or museum can try to convey an understanding of genocide. Questions to keep in mind as you observe each work: 1) What is the purpose of this memorial? Is it to honor, remember, educate others, or something else? 2) On what aspect of the Holocaust does this memorial focus? 3) What Jewish symbols are present? What national symbols are present? Are there human figures? Is it abstract? What other features do you notice about this memorial? 4) What is the setting of this memorial? How does that affect its purpose and design?
Kate Harris
24
 

The Remains at Pompeii

This is a collection of teaching resources that could be used to support a lesson on Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius as well as life in ancient Rome. Included are artworks picturing Pompeii, archaeological artifacts, and links to "street views" of the ruins as well as magazine articles on the topic. Some questions to consider are: -What can we learn about the life of ancient Romans from the ruins at Pompeii? -What are the strengths and weaknesses of learning from archaeological ruins? -Why have the ruins at Pompeii continued to fascinate people over time?
Kate Harris
12
 

The Mexican-American War: Before, During, and After

The purpose of this collection is to have students consider the causes and consequences of the Mexican-American War. Students will analyze each item in the collection and determine whether it represents the time period before the war, during, or after. Then students will answer a set of broad questions about the war. While most items in the collection have accompanying text, students may need to consult their textbooks or outside resources in order to answer some questions.
Kate Harris
18
 

Ancient Egypt: Sarcophaguses and Coffins

This is a collection of sarcophaguses and coffins from Ancient Egypt. The sarcophagus refers to the outer layer of protection for an important mummy, and would generally be carved or painted with images representing the deceased person. As you look through the collection, notice the difference between the sarcophaguses and coffins and pay attention to the kinds of images you see. What are common features that you might find on any sarcophagus? What kinds of things are different depending on who it is that is buried?
Kate Harris
6
 

The Irish Experience in Pittsburgh

<p>Created for the AIU3 workshop on 3/17/17, this topical collection includes images from Historic Pittsburgh (<a href="http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/">http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/</a>), the Smithsonian Collection, the records of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in the Detre Library and Archives, Heinz History Center, and additional web resources. This large group of documents is intended to be shaped and whittled into useful collections for individual classrooms. Teachers might consider linking the documents to themes like:</p><p>•Immigration</p><p style="margin-left:32px;">•Push and Pull factors</p><p style="margin-left:32px;">•Growth of social networks</p><p style="margin-left:32px;">•Assimilation</p><p style="margin-left:32px;">•Nativism</p><p style="margin-left:32px;">•Contributions (Political, Cultural, Military, Philanthropy)</p><p>•Industry in Western PA</p><p>•Labor Movement</p><p><br /></p><p>To make this collection your own, copy it and then use the edit feature to add and remove documents as well as contribute any annotations that might help your students. </p>
Kate Harris
29
 

Responses to Immigration: Then and Now

<p>This collection will prompt thinking about attitudes towards new immigrants throughout our nation's history. What has changed and what has stayed the same?</p><p>It is also designed to allow users to explore the range of technical features and content resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.</p><p>tags: immigrant, America, assimilate, nativism, stereotypes</p>
Kate Harris
10
 

All You Need is Love

<p>The best of love-themed graphic design in the Smithsonian Institution's collections. </p>
Kate Harris
12