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3,500+ Resources You May Not Know About

3,500+ Resources You May Not Know About

By: Michelle Smith, Associate Director for Digital Media, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access

It's natural—and correct—to think of artworks, objects, and artifacts when you come to the Learning Lab in search of resources. However, there are also many text resources that may be of particular interest to teachers and students. Here we will highlight just a small selection of these authoritative yet accessible articles and blog posts.

Magazine Articles

Smithsonian magazine looks at a variety of topics in history, science, the arts and culture and is increasingly making its current and archival articles available online. Click here to browse all of the Smithsonian magazine articles currently available.

This Learning Lab collection that celebrates the #HashtagHoliday of #NationalDoughnutDay incorporates one of these articles (it's the last item in the collection).

In addition to searching the Learning Lab database for articles (In the Refine Results panel for a "Resources" search try clicking the "text" box to narrow results), remember that it's easy to import items you find elsewhere. For texts that have been lexile leveled for K-12, visit the Smithsonian's Tween Tribune. To add an article to a collection you are building you would, within Edit mode for the collection, choose "Add Resource." When the Add Resource overlay panel appears, choose the "Add a Resource" tab, type or copy and paste the article's title and description, and select the "I want to contribute a website / URL."

Then all you need to do is to paste in the website address of an article, for example https://www.tweentribune.com/article/tween56/take-virtual-trip-international-space-station/, and click the "Add" button. The Learning Lab will generate a thumbnail image of that website, and add it into your collection.

Blog Posts

Blog posts are often the work of scientists and researchers writing for a general audience. Following are two of the most relevant to K-12 educators:

The National Museum of American History's "Oh, Say Can You See" blog articles are "behind-the-scenes" takes on history. The short articles may link to further explorations, as in the case of this story on U.S. citizenship and the museum.

Smithsonian Insider's pieces often present "research news," that students may use in projects, as in this piece on declining cheetah diversity.

The subject matter of these text resources may be what interests you most, but they may also provide useful models of informational writing. Locating some of these articles will take a bit longer than just entering a term into your browser's search box, but you'll know you can trust them and your students will be reading the work of the wide range of experts who work at the Smithsonian.


Royal KHM Typewriter

Image: Royal KHM Typewriter (detail)
This Royal KHM model typewriter was produced by the Royal Typewriter Company of Hartford, Connecticut in 1934. The Royal KHM was very similar to the Royal 10, but notable differences include plastic instead of glass sides, no scooped center, and covered ribbon spools...
National Museum of American History