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The thrill of discovery awaits you in the Smithsonian Learning Lab. From the Discovery space shuttle to the Star Spangled Banner to dinosaur fossils, the Learning Lab gives everyone with a desire to learn the opportunity to explore the Smithsonian's rich resources anytime, anywhere. Start discovering what interests you today, and find your inspiration from more than a million multimedia resources.

Suggested Discoveries

Coral Reef Official Trailer

Smithsonian Institution
This is one of our many options in our On Demand Library! Visit the link below to learn more about group packages: http://si.edu/groupsales

Introductory Trailer to Chandra (High Definition)

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
To commemorate Chandra's ten years in orbit, a new trailer has been produced to spotlight NASA's premier X-ray telescope. This short video begins with Galileo some 400 years ago and brings the viewer to modern astronomy, of which Chandra's high-energy Universe plays a critical role. Transcript: In Florence, Italy, in the year 1609, the world changed. Using a small telescope, Galileo proved that the Earth is not distinct from the universe, but part of it. And he showed that there is much more to the universe than we see with the naked eye. In the twentieth century, astronomers made another revolutionary discovery - that optical telescopes reveal only a portion of the universe. Telescopes sensitive to invisible wavelengths of light have detected microwave radiation from the Big Bang, infrared radiation from proto-planetary disks around stars, and X-rays from explosions produce by black holes. Ten years ago this July, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever made began its exploration of the hot Universe. Explore the Universe with Chandra.

Pressure Suit, RX-2-A, Constant Volume, Litton

National Air and Space Museum
This RX-2-A Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit is an experimental constant volume suit was manufactured by Litton Industries who made a series of "hard" suits during the early 1960s. These experimental suits were designed to maintain an almost perfectly constant volume while enabling a full range of body motions. They could operate at higher pressure, thus reducing the time-consuming oxygen pre-breathing period before extra vehicular activities.

It has more sophisticated shoulder joints than the RX-2, and closes with a dual-plane closure at the back. It operated at 5psi instead of the 3.7psi of the Apollo soft suits.

Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum from NASA in 1977

David Boxley Totem Pole at the National Museum of the American Indian

National Museum of the American Indian
David Boxley, a Tsimshian carver from Alaska, created a totem pole for the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Boxley, who grew up in Metlakatla, and his son finished the work in the museum's Potomac atrium, where the Tsimshian dance group Git--Hoan (People of the Salmon) celebrated the unveiling. "There's few of us," Boxley told the Washington Post. "But we're alive and well. We wanted to let people know we're alive and well." The totem features a chief holding salmon, a group of villagers, and an eagleā€”the symbol of Boxleys' clan.

Apollo 11 - Buzz Aldrin Mobility Experiment (Kangaroo Hop)

National Air and Space Museum
Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin tests mobility on the lunar surface, July 20, 1969. NASA Video from Apollo Lunar Surface Journal More information and videos: http://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/video11.html#Step Original source video: http://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11v_1101342.mpg

Star-Spangled Banner

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Star-Spangled Banner, undated. Note that the "A" sewn into the flag has been whited out in the image The Star-Spangled Banner was the Garrison flag of Ft. McHenry, Baltimore, during the bombardment of the fort by the British, September 13-14, 1814, when it was successfully defended by Colonel George Armistead. The flag was presented to the United States National Museum, Washington, D.C., by Mr. Eben Appleton of New York, the grandson of Colonel George Armistead.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is stopped by police at Medgar Evers' funeral, Jackson, MS

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photograph depicts Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His face is framed by the head and shoulders of two men in the foreground.