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The thrill of discovery awaits you in the Smithsonian Learning Lab. From the Discovery space shuttle to the Star Spangled Banner to dinosaur fossils, the Learning Lab gives everyone with a desire to learn the opportunity to explore the Smithsonian's rich resources anytime, anywhere. Start discovering what interests you today, and find your inspiration from more than a million multimedia resources.

Suggested Discoveries

Albert Einstein

National Portrait Gallery
Albert Einstein transformed the world of physics with his groundbreaking theory of relativity, and in 1921 he received the Nobel Prize for “his services to theoretical physics” and “his discovery of the law of photoelectric effect.” The German-born physicist was visiting the United States when Hitler and the Nazis came to power in his homeland in 1933. Einstein never returned to Germany. Instead, he accepted a position at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey—the newly established academic institution that would become a major center for research in theoretical physics. In residence at the institute for the remainder of his life, Einstein continued to publish, work on the interpretation of quantum theory, and wrestle without success on his unified field theory. He became a U.S. citizen in 1940.

Karsh relished the opportunity to photograph Einstein, whose face, “in all its rough grandeur, invited and challenged the camera.”

Dizzy Gillespie [ca. 1984-1990 : black-and-white photoprint]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Displayed in Archives Center exhibition, "Gift of the Artist: Photographers as Donors," November, 2011-Feb. 29, 2012. David Haberstich, curator.

Gillespie playing trumpet.

Pressure Suit, RX-2-A, Constant Volume, Litton

National Air and Space Museum
This RX-2-A Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit is an experimental constant volume suit was manufactured by Litton Industries who made a series of "hard" suits during the early 1960s. These experimental suits were designed to maintain an almost perfectly constant volume while enabling a full range of body motions. They could operate at higher pressure, thus reducing the time-consuming oxygen pre-breathing period before extra vehicular activities.

It has more sophisticated shoulder joints than the RX-2, and closes with a dual-plane closure at the back. It operated at 5psi instead of the 3.7psi of the Apollo soft suits.

Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum from NASA in 1977

Star-Spangled Banner

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Star-Spangled Banner, undated. Note that the "A" sewn into the flag has been whited out in the image The Star-Spangled Banner was the Garrison flag of Ft. McHenry, Baltimore, during the bombardment of the fort by the British, September 13-14, 1814, when it was successfully defended by Colonel George Armistead. The flag was presented to the United States National Museum, Washington, D.C., by Mr. Eben Appleton of New York, the grandson of Colonel George Armistead.

David Boxley Totem Pole at the National Museum of the American Indian

National Museum of the American Indian
David Boxley, a Tsimshian carver from Alaska, created a totem pole for the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Boxley, who grew up in Metlakatla, and his son finished the work in the museum's Potomac atrium, where the Tsimshian dance group Git--Hoan (People of the Salmon) celebrated the unveiling. "There's few of us," Boxley told the Washington Post. "But we're alive and well. We wanted to let people know we're alive and well." The totem features a chief holding salmon, a group of villagers, and an eagle—the symbol of Boxleys' clan.

Amelia Earhart

National Portrait Gallery
A late photograph of Amelia Earhart

To locate tiny Howland Island, Earhart and Fred Noonan expected to communicate with the Itasca, a United States Coast Guard cutter that President Roosevelt agreed to locate near the island for assistance. Although the cutter received messages, at first faint but then clearer and stronger, communication ultimately failed. Upon learning that the pair had not arrived, Roosevelt ordered a massive sea and air search that went on for more than two weeks. When that search was terminated, George Putnam underwrote his own search that lasted until October. Newspapers around the globe covered the search on a nearly daily basis. Yet as time elapsed, hope for their safe recovery faded. In 1939, a probate court in Los Angeles declared Earhart legally dead. Neither the plane nor the bodies of the two pilots have ever been recovered.