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The Black Power Movement

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Civics +2 Age Levels Middle School (13 to 15 years old), Post-Secondary

Teaching about the Black Power Movement can be challenging, but has rich rewards. Misconceptions about the Black Power Movement abound, but the ability to contrast their strategies and aims with the earlier Civil Rights Movement allows Social Studies teachers to discuss the complex ways that social movements evolve, change, and respond to the times. In addition, a study of the Black Power Movement helps give context for a broader study of the economic and political shifts in the 1970s and 1980s and the rise of identity politics. This teaching collection includes a variety of resources that could be used to teach about the Black Power Movement, organized into sections for:

-People in the Movement

-Goals and Strategies of the Movement

-Teaching Activities

General guiding questions for this collection include:

-What were the distinct problems that the Black Power Movement tried to address? Do they remain today?

-What were the strategies of the Black Power Movement? Do you agree or disagree with these?

-Why and how do social movements develop and evolve?

-What defines a successful social movement? Was the Black Power Movement successful?

- Can a social movement survive beyond the demise of its leadership?

-What is the role of the arts in promoting the ideals of social movements?

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Black Panther guard at Unitarian Church, San Rafael, California, No. 123

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Malcolm X

National Portrait Gallery

Martin Luther King, Jr.

National Portrait Gallery

Stokely Carmichael and H. Rap Brown

National Portrait Gallery

Stokely Carmichael at SNCC Office, Atlanta, GA

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Stokely Carmichael

National Portrait Gallery

Huey Percy Newton and Bobby Seale

National Portrait Gallery

Huey Newton

National Portrait Gallery

Amiri Baraka

National Portrait Gallery

A Poem for Black Hearts

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Flier for the Black Community Survival Conference

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Am I Not A Man And A Brother?

National Portrait Gallery

Women! Free Our Sisters

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Huey! [sound recording] : Listen, Whitey!

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture