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Roman Architecture: Arches and Columns

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Social Studies +6 Age Levels Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old)
Roman architecture continued the legacy left by the Greeks. However, the Romans were great innovators and quickly adopted new construction techniques, used new materials, and uniquely combined existing techniques with creative design to create some of the worlds most amazing architectural structures.
Many Roman innovations were created in response to the practical changing needs of Roman society and were designed and built across the Roman world guaranteeing their permanence so that many of these great edifices still exist today.

Source citation: Cartwright, Mark. "Roman Architecture." Ancient History Encyclopedia. 2013. Web. 4 Jan. 2016.

Elevation of Section of a Wall with Columns and Arch at Left

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