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National Youth Summit 2019 | Woman Suffrage: The Ballot and Beyond

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Language Arts And English +1 Age Levels Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)

Suffrage marked an important moment in the progression of women's participation in American democracy and civic life. Yet it was an imperfect victory, and one that stands neither as a beginning nor an end, but as an important milestone in the fight for equality, justice and representation. The 2019 National Youth Summit will look at woman suffrage as an example of how groups with limited political power have shaped and continue to shape our democracy using tactics and tools, like public protest and the vote, to give voice to issues and galvanize fellow Americans into communal movements for change. Use this collection to examine the legacy of the woman suffrage movement and explore the guiding question: What can we learn from the tactics of the suffragists?

Download the conversation kit and learn about the 2019 National Youth Summit webcast here.

Guiding Questions

National Museum of American History

Susan B. Anthony's Shawl

National Museum of American History

Woman Suffrage Postcard

National Museum of American History

Woman Suffrage Postcard, 1910

National Museum of American History

Woman Suffrage Postcard, 1913

National Museum of American History

Woman Suffrage Wagon

National Museum of American History

The Suffragist, June 14, 1919

National Museum of American History

Vote handbill, 1920s

National Museum of American History

Banner with the motto of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, ca. 1924

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Running for Public Office

Gift of Matilda Brancato Faulkner, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Photograph of women and children at voter registration motorcade

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Frances Albrier Collection, @Cox Studio

Pro-ERA button, 1972-1982

National Museum of American History

Anti-ERA button, 1972-1982

National Museum of American History

The Changing Face of Congress

Pew Research Center