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National Candy Month: Highlights Collection

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Design +4 Age Levels Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old)

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Tootsie Rolls were WWII energy bars. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Candy Bean Shipping Crate

National Museum of American History

Chocolate box

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Cadbury's Cocoa

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Wrigley DoubleMint Gum Display Box

National Museum of American History

37c Candy Hearts single

National Postal Museum

Hershey's Milk Chocolate Box

National Museum of American History

American Red Cross M&M's Cellophane Bag

National Museum of American History

Tootsie Roll Industries, Inc.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

39c With Love and Kisses single

National Postal Museum

MARS Cookie or Candy Jar

National Museum of American History

A Brief History of Chocolate

Smithsonian Magazine

Triple Chocolate Liquor Mill

National Museum of American History

How Candy Canes Are Made by Hand

Smithsonian Magazine

Candy

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Glassed Candy (from "Presidential Portfolio")

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Blue Vendor

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Girl with Lollipop, (painting)

Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

(Candy), (painting)

Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

Molasses Swamp II

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Yes She He

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Japanese sweets, from set 2 of a Hana Kurabe series of 10 sets

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery