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George Catlin: Indian Portraiture

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Social Studies +1 Age Levels Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)

During the 1830s, George Catlin and his team produced over five hundred images of native American life on the western plains. Nearly half of his work consisted of exquisite portraits of Indians of many different tribes. Some tribes like the Hidatsa disappeared before any other visual representation of them could be made.

George Catlin: Indian Portraiture

National Portrait Gallery

Káh-kée-tsee, Thighs, a Wichita Woman

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Mi-néek-ee-súnk-te-ka, Mink, a Beautiful Girl

Smithsonian American Art Museum

O'n-daig, The Crow, a Dandy

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Say-say-gon, Hail Storm, War Chief

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Kee-o-kúk, The Watchful Fox, Chief of the Tribe

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Wúk-mi-ser, Corn, a Miniconjou Warrior

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sha-có-pay, The Six, Chief of the Plains Ojibwa

Smithsonian American Art Museum

I-o-wáy, One of Black Hawk's Principal Warriors

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sha-wá-no, The South, a Noted Warrior

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Wáh-pe-say, The White

Smithsonian American Art Museum

O-tá-wah, The Ottaway, a Warrior

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Ud-je-jock, Pelican, a Boy

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Ni-có-man, The Answer, Second Chief

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Tchán-dee, Tobacco, an Oglala Chief

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Shó-me-kós-see, The Wolf, a Chief

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Háh-nee, The Beaver, a Warrior

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Wah-pón-jee-a, The Swan, a Warrior

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Ye-hów-lo-gee, The Cloud, a Chief

Smithsonian American Art Museum