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Child Labor in America

5 Favorites 4 Copies (view)
Civics +7 Age Levels Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old)
What would it have been like to be a child working during the period 1830-1930? Why did children have to go to work during this period in America's history?
Resources in this Collection includes paintings, photographs, text-based sources, and a video depicting children working in a variety of industries across America.

Industry

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Lewis Wickes Hine

National Portrait Gallery

Georgia • USA

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Worker in Cotton Mill, Rhode Island, 1909

National Museum of American History

32c Child Labor Reform single

National Postal Museum

Laundry Girl • New Orleans, LA

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Shoe Shine Boy

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Shine, Shave and Haircut

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Farm Life (mural study?)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Blacksmith's Apprentice, (painting)

Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

Boys at the Lehr, Economy Glass Works

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Breaker Boy of Shenandoah, Pa. [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Picking Slate and Bony Coal

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Franklin D. Roosevelt

National Portrait Gallery

U.G.W. of A.

National Museum of American History