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Bloody Sunday: A March for Freedom

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Social Studies +2 Age Levels Middle School (13 to 15 years old), Post-Secondary
Sunday morning, March 7, 1965, several hundred protesters gathered in Selma Alabama planning to march to Montgomery in the hopes of obtaining federal protection for a voting rights statute. As the group, led by John Lewis and members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, approached the Edmund Pettus Bridge they were blocked by Alabama State Troopers and local police. The confrontation turned violent after law enforcement ordered the protesters to turn around and when they didn't comply they were assaulted with tear gas and beaten with billy clubs resulting in more than 50 people being hospitalized.

Key terms:
Civil Rights
Civil Rights Movement

Ticket stub for Washington, DC to Montgomery, AL for Selma-Montgomery March

National Museum of African American History and Culture

John Lewis and Julian Bond

National Portrait Gallery

Welcome to Selma

National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Edmund Pettus Bridge

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Two Minute Warning

National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Beating

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Disgusting

National Museum of African American History and Culture

George Wallace

National Portrait Gallery

Martin Luther King, Jr.

National Portrait Gallery

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Citizenship Workbook

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Ralph J. Bunche

National Portrait Gallery

The Selma to Montgomery March, March 21 - 25

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Joan Baez, Selma to Montgomery March, 1965

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Coming Into Montgomery

National Museum of African American History and Culture

LBJ - President Signs Civil Rights Bill

National Portrait Gallery

Pen used by Lyndon B. Johnson to sign the 1965 Voting Rights Act

National Museum of African American History and Culture