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Found 9,485 Resources

Stoneware

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragment, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragment, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragment, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragment, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragment, stoneware

National Museum of American History

fragments, stoneware

National Museum of American History

Stoneware Bunchin

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Stoneware Bunchin

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Stoneware jar

National Museum of American History
The Remmey and Crolius families dominated the New York stoneware industry from the early 1700s through the early 1800s. Both families emigrated from Germany, bringing with them the stoneware traditions of their homeland. Sometimes business associates, the two families also inter-married. Remmey family members went on to establish stoneware factories in Philadelphia and Baltimore, as well.

Stoneware stein

National Museum of American History
The opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 contributed to the establishment of numerous stoneware factories in towns such as Utica, New York. The White family first began making utilitarian pottery in Utica in 1834, and started using molds and steam-powered pottery wheels in the 1870s, expanding the types of wares they could produce. By the late 1800s, they were known for their relief molded wares, such as this stein.

Stoneware jug

National Museum of American History
Stoneware containers were useful for storing many goods into the 1900s. Before the development of canning and refrigeration, stoneware forms were staples in most homes, used to hold salted or pickled food as well as beverages and dairy products. This jug, probably meant to hold water, ale, whiskey or beer, features an incised design. By the time this piece was made, most potters had turned to glaze painting, which was faster and easier to produce.

Stoneware flask

National Museum of American History
Early in their partnership, Nathan Clark and Ethan S. Fox produced both earthenware and stoneware. They stopped making earthenware in the 1830s to focus on stoneware forms such as molasses jugs, beer bottles and spittoons, all considered innovative shapes. This elaborately decorated flask may have been designed to compete with glass flasks being made at the time.

Stoneware jar

National Museum of American History
Floral, bird, and animal motifs were commonly used to decorate 19th century stoneware in the United States. This jar, made by John Remmey III, features an incised and cobalt decorated fish.

Remmey pottery is often marked “Manhattan-Wells” referring to the firm’s location near the municipal water supply.

Stoneware inkwell

National Museum of American History
Stoneware maker Nathan Clark partnered with Ethan S. Fox, a relative by marriage, in 1829. In response to increasing competition they began selling more elaborately decorated “Fancy Ware made to order.” The names on this inkwell, LYON & ASHLEY, may refer to the people or firm that placed the order.

Stoneware jug

National Museum of American History
Israel Seymour operated a pottery in Troy, New York from about 1809 to 1865. This beautifully formed jug is a fine example of much of the stoneware made by New York potters--simple utilitarian pieces, without adornment, that met the needs of the people who used them.

Stoneware jar

National Museum of American History
John William Crolius immigrated to Manhattan from Germany in 1728 and established a successful pottery dynasty. This piece was probably made by Clarkson Crolius Jr., John William’s grandson. The last potter to work in the family business, Clarkson closed the pottery in 1849. This jar is glazed with Albany slip clay which was discovered in the Hudson Valley region about 1830 and soon became a preferred glaze for stoneware vessels.

Stoneware jug

National Museum of American History
The Remmey family began producing pottery in New York City in 1735, when John Remmey I emigrated from Germany. His grandson, John Remmey III, took over the family business in 1793, continuing to produce some of the finest stoneware made in the United States at the time. The somewhat lopsided incised leaf design on this jug reminds us that each piece was made and decorated by hand.
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