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5c Urban Planning plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No.57174

Denomination: 5c

Subject: View of Model City, Urban Planning Issue

Color: dark blue, light blue & black

Planning and Designing Beyond Equity in Cities Across America

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Interview with Toni L. Griffin and Chris Reed, who collaborated on the Detroit Future City Strategic Framework—an innovative planning model for urban revitalization.

Pinback button for the Queens Walk for Development

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pinback button for the Queens Walk For Development. The button has a white background with black text around the outer edge that reads [Queens Walk For Development / April 30, 1972]. At center there is a black circle with a white interior circle and white upside down triangle. The exterior edge of the button has the manufacturer's information printed in black ink. The back of the button has a metal pin without a clasp.

Teacher-created lesson in which the class compares the urban layouts of Philadelphia and Seville, Spain. The essential question: How does the design of a city affect the lives of residents? Students give their answers in Spanish.

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which the class compares the urban layouts of Philadelphia and Seville, Spain. The essential question: How does the design of a city affect the lives of residents? Students give their answers in Spanish.

The Soul City Sounder Vol. III, No. 5

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Vol. III, No. 5 of the Soul City Sounder. The newsletter features stories about the construction of Soul City and the first sales of properties in the planned community. The newsletter is composed of black text on white paper, folded to produce a front page, an inside spread, and a back page. The front page features an image of Floyd McKissick and Kimp Talley in front of the Soul City sign at the entrance to the development.

Promotional pamphlet for Soul City

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Promotional pamphlet for Soul City. The pamphlet is black with red letters and green banner across the bottom. The words [SOUL / CITY] are in red bubble letters. The rest of the cover reads [A NEW CITY/ DEVELOPED BY / FLOYD B. / McKISSICK ENTERPRISES, INC.]. The inside of the pamphlet describes Soul City and outlines why the city is necessary and how it will operate and sustain iself. The back of the pamphlet is a black and white map showing the area from Washington, D.C. to Raleigh, North Carolina. [Soul City] is highlighted in red letters on the map just north of Raleigh.

Services

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Services. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using purple and black ink. The pamphlet describes what public services are planned for in Soul City. It features an image of a clinic, a map of the community and an image of people walking.

Soul City

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Soul City. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio. The pamphlet is printed using red, pink and black ink. The pamphlet is an overview for the planned community of Soul City and features sections on shopping areas, residential areas and industrial areas. Images and maps are also printed in the pamphlet.

Soul City

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A portfolio titled Soul City. Printed below the title of the portfolio is "The Bold New Alternative." The portfolio contains printed material promoting a planned community in North Carolina to be developed with federal and state funds. The portfolio contains eight pamphlets titled Residential, Industrial, Commercial, Utilities & Transportation, Doing business in Soul City, Services, People and Soul City.

People

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled People. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using blue and black ink. The front features six images. The images are of two people in front of a blackboard, a girl hugging a woman, a man taking a picture, a baby, a man’s face and a boy holding a football. The pamphlet describes how the community plans to improve the quality of life for residents.

Utilities & Transportation

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Utilities & Transportation. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using green and black ink. It describes what utilities and transportation services are available for the community and who provides them. It features maps transportation options in and near by the Soul City and an image of utility buildings.

Doing Business in Soul City

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Doing Business in Soul City. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using red and black ink. The pamphlet describes what incentives there are for opening a small business in Soul City. It features a map of Warren County and an image of two men talking over paperwork on a desk.

Commercial

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Commercial. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using brown and black ink. It describes how the shopping district of the community will be designed and planned and what potential residents can expect from in the commercial district of the town. It features maps of the shopping district of the planned community and images of shops.

Residential

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Residential. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using orange and black ink. It describes the types of homes that will be found in Soul City and features maps of the community and images of neighborhoods.

Industrial

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled Industrial. The pamphlet is one of eight found in a portfolio titled Soul City. The pamphlet is printed using red and black ink. It describes why Soul City would be an ideal place for industry and what sort of jobs the community will provide. It features maps of the region and of the community.

Plan of Philadelphia

National Museum of American History

Pinback button for Kenneth A. Gibson mayoral campaign

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pink, yellow, black, and white pinback button for Kenneth A. Gibson's campaign for mayor of Newark, New Jersey. The top of the button has a pink arc with a yellow semi-circle under it. The majority of the pin has a black background with white and yellow text that reads [Gibson / A-1]. The exterior edge of the button has the manufacture's information printed in black ink. The back of the button has a metal pin without a clasp.

Design Pulse: What is the Future of Mobility Design?

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Leading figures in design, transportation, and technology share their perspectives on the future of mobility.

Urban Focus

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Vertically arranged strips of 35mm film overlaid on a black and white New York cityscape. Windows and floors of office buildings

Redesign My Street! Street Design for Pedestrian Safety

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students explore issues of pedestrian safety in their community. They conduct interviews and brainstorm ideas for redesigning a street or intersection.

A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia

National Museum of American History

It's The Same Old Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm color film that features interviews with children about their neighborhood, interviews with community activists, and planners that advocate for community involvement. Aimed at the local citizen, this film encourages citizen participation in the planning process. Footage shows problematic aspects of poor urban planning, including air pollution caused by trucks, water pollution, and other problems with industrial areas to close to residential areas. Footage also includes a contentious meeting on the construction of a new high school near Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn.

2012.79.1.52.1a: 16mm color film.

The film begins with a voiceover narration and a soft music soundtrack. The narration explains that without citizen involvement in the planning process, then planning will be, as the title suggests, "the same old game." The film then shows three men standing over a table with a model of a city plan on it. The next scene features Leroy Bowser standing with a pole over a large floor model of New York City. As he discusses housing in the city, he moves around the model and points to different neighborhoods. The next scenes show houses and streets in Jamaica, Queens. Children are interviewed, and they discuss problems with crime and sanitation. The next interview is with Dan De Vore, and he talk about problems with housing that shares neighborhood space with industrial businesses. The footage then shows more street scenes and interviews with the same group of children from earlier in the film. The next scene features a group of planners looking at plans on a table. The next interview is with Max Bond, and he discusses the importance of community power. An unidentified woman joins in and remarks about the "game," and the struggle to figure out how to leverage it to the community's advantage. Max Bond agrees and suggests one way to change the "game" is to that elect people from the neighborhood onto planning commissions and into other offices. The next person to speak is Art Symes, and he remarks that even with getting community people involved in planning commissions, the old methods require change as well. The next scene shows street scenes in Harlem, and then an aerial view of the streets from the top of a building. The next interview is with Paul Davidoff, and he discusses the problems with white professional planners making decisions on planning without working with people on the street and understanding what they need and the problems to fix. The next scenes show various problems with housing near industrial districts. In particular, the film shows the problems in Red Hook, Brooklyn, such as the air pollution close to recreation areas for children. The film continues to show a variety of industrial blight mixed in with housing in south Brooklyn. The next interview is with José Flores, and he discusses how to improve neighborhood aesthetics and the problems with heavy trucks traveling through the neighborhood. The next scenes show the problem with a highway cutting through a neighborhood. The next scene shows a community meeting about a planned high school for Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. About a half dozen residents speak out about the planning process and how decisions are made. The main issue appears to be black and white children attending the high school together. There are also many shots of the audience at the meeting. The next interview is with Francisco A. Román as he is in the process of moving his mother out of her apartment because of his concerns about rising crime in the Red Hook neighborhood. The next interview is with Dr. J.D. Carroll, and he talks about the planning in a broader sense of how all of the smaller parts fit together across the entire region and the problems with competing interests. The next scene features Greenburg, New York, where low density, low income housing exists away from industrial areas. There are several shots of children walking around and playing basketball. The final scenes area a montage of clips from the film. The film ends with a shot of traffic coming towards the camera as the film credits are displayed.

2012.79.1.52.1b: Original metal film reel.

2012.79.1.52.1c: Original metal film can. On the film can, there is a label with information that reads [Sterling/ Educational Films/ 241 East 34th Street New York 16, N.Y./ Title: Same Old Game/ Print No. I].

An Outline of Resurrection City as Used

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A manuscript of a work, "An Outline of Resurrection City as Used," heavily notated with fiber-tip pen, blue colored pencil, and graphite pencil. The pages are single-sided with typed black ink. The work begins with three unnumbered pages followed by pages numbered 2 through 22, for a total of 25 pages. The second page, unnumbered, features a diagram of Resurrection City on the National Mall. An example of a handwritten note on the object appears on Page 2 in the left margin adjacent to underlined type and reads [WHAT DOES / THIS IMPLY / ABOUT SUCCESS OR / FAILURE OF / R. CITY?]. Handwritten comments appear in at least three separate hands: one in orange pen and occasionally in graphite, one exclusively in graphite, and one in blue colored pencil. Page 4 features an organizational chart of Resurrection City. The front cover has light damage at the corners, and pages are creased at the corners from handling.
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