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Transportation

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Transportation

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Less than one repeat of design of scattered locomotives and railway trains, accompanied by dates: 1830, 1870, 1935. A design inspired by the pageant, "Wings of a Century" at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, depicting the development of the railroads in America. Printed in green, red and gray on gray ground.

Philadelphia Transportation Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. The center of the token reads PTC and bears the PTC wing logo.

Obverse: Small Keystone symbol at the bottom. The legend reads: PHILADELPHIA/PTC

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR/ONE FARE/PTC

Philadelphia Transportation Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. The center of the token reads PTC and bears the PTC logo.

Obverse: Small Keystone symbol at the bottom. The legend reads: PHILADELPHIA/PTC

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR/ONE CASH FARE/PTC

Bunker Hill Transportation Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. There center is punched out to form a “B.”

Obverse: The legend reads: BUNKER HILL TRANSPORTATION CO.

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR ONE SCHOOL FARE.

North East Transportation Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. A triangle is punched out of the center of the token.

Obverse: The legend reads: NORTH EAST TRANSP CO. INC.

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR/ONE FARE

Bunker Hill Transportation Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. There is a triangle punched out of the center.

Obverse: The legend reads: BUNKER HILL TRANSP. CO. INC.

Reverse: The legend reads: GOOD FOR ONE FARE.

"Transportation" painting

National Postal Museum
Mounted between wood and glass, Transportation is a 2 foot by 2.5 foot oil painting on canvas by Vincent Aderente. Similar to much of Aderente's work, the painting depicts a female allegorical figure, most likely representing progress, standing with each hand upon a particular mode of transportation--shipping and the railroad. Her right hand touches a ship with the wide expanse of ocean extending beyond it. Her left hand touches a train that stands adjacent to various smokestacks and factories indicative of industrialization.

The size of this particular painting is very small compared to the rest of Vincent Aderente's portfolio. Consequently, it can be assumed that this painting was a study for a larger mural to be produced at a later date. Markings on the back indicate that Aderente painted this work in 1918, a time when his reputation was growing.

Vincent Aderente was born in 1880 in Naples, Italy, and came to the United States with his parents at the age of six. Much of his early career was as an assistant to the muralist Edwin Blashfield where he worked to build the murals now seen at the Detroit Public Library in 1922. Although most of Aderente's larger work was limited to the New Jersey and Hudson area, Aderente did some small commissions involving printed poems for the American Weekly and the New York Sunday Americans in 1924 which paired his illustrations of allegorical women with poetry. Vincent Aderente is perhaps best known for his work on a series of World War I posters entitled “Columbia Calls,” along with designing eight US Government Bonds in 1935. Aderente died in 1941.

Reference:

Aderente, Vincent Papers, 1906-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. [D32].

Transportation (boats)

National Museum of American History

Transportation [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Niger River - ferry for truck, Inland Delta region, Niger. The date on the slide is June 1989.

Transportation [March]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Transportation (Boats)

National Museum of American History

Land Transportation

National Air and Space Museum
Shows land transportation from early to modern, brief introduction of history of land transportation; multicolor image on paper with metal hangers at top and bottom. Relief Halftone/Letterpress.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Sea Transportation

National Air and Space Museum
Shows sea transportation from early to modern times, "Look How Far We Have Come"; multicolor image on paper with metal hangers at top and bottom. Offset Photolithograph.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Land Transportation

National Air and Space Museum
Offset Lithograph/Screen print with lavender background;scenes from history of transportation, trains,cars, etc.; multicolor image on lavender background; ink on paper with metal hangers.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Water Transportation

National Air and Space Museum
Offset Lithograph with turquoise background, depictions of types of water transportation from canoes to seaplanes; turquoise, brown, and black ink on paper with one metal hanger.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Panamanian Transportation Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this token around 1880. Scovill was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer that is still in business today. Scovill is an important example of early American industrial manufacturing that adapted armory machines to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, and coins.

Obverse: The legend reads: VALE AL PORTADOR/5 COLON/J. SUCRE

Reverse: The legend reads: VALE AL PORTADOR/5 COLON/J. SUCRE

Air Transportation

National Air and Space Museum
Relief Halftone/Letterpress depicting various scenes of aircraft including Zeppelin (LZ 129), seaplanes (Short S.17 Kent, Martin M-130), airplanes (HP.42w-registration number G-AAXD, Douglas DC-2) and Wright Flyer; multicolor image on paper with metal hangers.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Public transportation, Ibadan, Nigeria, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Public transportation, Ibadan, Nigeria, [negative]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Smithsonian Source: Transportation

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Section of SmithsonianSource.org intended to supplement the materials you currently use for lessons on the importance of travel and transportation in American life. Includes a video in which Smithsonian curators discuss the legacy of Amelia Earhart, a DBQ on the impact of developing a Federal Interstate Highway System, and primary source documents from Smithsonian collections.

Transportation Infrastructure Videos

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Three short videos provide an overview of the history of America's transportation infrastructure in three eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition America on the Move.

Transportation History Videos

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Three short videos provide an overview of American transportation history in three different eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition America on the Move.

Transportation Technology Videos

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Three short videos provide an overview of transportation technology in three eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition America on the Move.
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