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"Broncho Busters & Indian Warriors!!" Mutoscope Movie Poster

National Museum of American History
Blue posterboard with painted advertisement for the mutoscope motion picture "Broncho Busters & Indian Warriors!!" The poster includes an attached photograph depicting a scene from the movie, in which Native American horsemen ride before an assembled crowd at a parade ground. Wild West shows like that of Buffalo Bill Cody were familiar spectacles to most Americans in the early 20th century. Wild West show companies, often composed of Native Americans, cowboy actors, and a variety of animals, toured the country as did circuses, playing to large crowds eager to catch a glimpse of the nation's disappearing frontier culture. This mutoscope movie poster proves that even filmed versions of such shows found a popular audience.

The Mutoscope Collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection is among the most significant of its kind in any museum. Composed of 3 cameras, 13 viewers, 59 movie reels and 53 movie posters, the collection documents the early years of the most successful and influential motion picture company of the industry’s formative period. It also showcases a unique style of movie exhibition that outlasted its early competitors, existing well into the 20th century.

The American Mutoscope Company was founded in 1895 by a group of four men, Elias Koopman, Herman Casler, Henry Marvin and William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, to manufacture a motion picture viewer called the mutoscope and to produce films for exhibition. Dickson had recently left the employ of Thomas Edison, for whom he had solved the problem of “doing for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear” by inventing the modern motion picture. Casler and Dickson worked together to perfect the mutoscope, which exhibited films transferred to a series of cards mounted in the style of a flip book on a metal core, and avoided Edison’s patents with this slightly different style of exhibition. The company’s headquarters in New York City featured a rooftop studio on a turntable to ensure favorable illumination, and the short subjects made here found such success that by 1897, the Edison company’s dominance of the industry was in danger. American Mutoscope became American Mutoscope & Biograph in 1899, when the namesake projector, invented by Casler, became the most used in the industry.

Mutoscope viewers were found in many amusement areas and arcades until at least the 1960s. Their inexpensiveness and short, often comical or sensational subjects allowed the machines a far longer life than the competing Edison Kinetoscope. The company also found success in its production and projection of motion pictures, though its activity was mired by patent litigation involving Thomas Edison through the 1910s. The notable director D. W. Griffith was first hired as an actor, working with pioneering cinematographer G. W. “Billy” Bitzer, before moving behind the camera at Biograph and making 450 films for the company.

Griffith and Bitzer invented cinematographic techniques like the fade-out and iris shot, made the first film in Hollywood and launched the careers of early stars Mary Pickford and Lillian Gish. The company, simply renamed the Biograph Company in 1909, went out of business in 1928 after losing Griffith and facing a changing movie industry.

The Museum’s collection was acquired in the years between 1926 and the mid-1970s. The original mutograph camera and two later models of the camera were given to the Smithsonian in 1926 by the International Mutoscope Reel Company, which inherited Biograph’s mutoscope works and continued making the viewers and reels through the 1940s. The viewers, reels and posters in the collection were acquired for exhibition in the National Museum of American History, and were later accessioned as objects in the Photographic History Collection. Many of the mutoscope reels in the collection date to the period from 1896-1905, and show early motion picture subjects, some of which were thought to be lost films before their examination in 2008.

"Buffalo Bill" Cody

National Portrait Gallery
To a great promoter like Colonel William F. Cody, the semireligious phrase "I Am Coming" required larger letters on this poster than the identification of the face that everyone would already recognize. Cody, originally a frontier scout, Indian fighter, and buffalo hunter, had become famous as the hero of "Buffalo Bill" dime novels and magazine stories. In 1882 he created his popular wild west show and toured as its star for thirty years, arguably doing more than any single American to popularize the myth of the West. Combining sharpshooting, riding, and roping with historical reenactments of war dances, buffalo hunts, stagecoach attacks, and "Custer's Last Fight," Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show had enormous international appeal. In fact, this copy of the poster, bearing a French tax stamp (top right), is a testament to his extremely successful tours in France.

"Buffalo Bill" Cody

National Portrait Gallery
William F. Cody did arguably more than any single individual to popularize the myth of the American West. Before achieving international fame as a showman, he worked a variety of short-term jobs, including serving as a Pony Express rider, an army scout, and a hunting guide. Nicknamed "Buffalo Bill" because of his prowess in hunting buffalo, Cody entered the world of entertainment after a dime novelist in New York wrote a story about his exploits in the West. A subsequent offer to appear on stage led first to a theatrical career and ultimately to the creation in 1883 of his touring Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. For the next thirty years he was the centerpiece of this wildly popular display that combined rodeo and historical reenactment. This photograph was created in 1887, the year Cody first toured his wild west show in Europe.

"Buffalo Bill" Cody

National Portrait Gallery
Born Scott County, Iowa

William Cody did more than any single American to popularize the myth of the American West. Before achieving international fame as a showman, he worked a variety of short-term jobs, including serving as a Pony Express rider, an army scout, and a hunting guide. Nicknamed "Buffalo Bill" because of his prowess in hunting buffalo, Cody entered the world of entertainment after a dime novelist in New York wrote a story about his exploits in the West. A subsequent offer to appear on stage led first to a theatrical career and ultimately to the creation of his touring Wild West Show in 1882. For the next thirty years he was the centerpiece of this wildly popular display that combined rodeo, historical reenactment, and other western-themed performances. This photograph dates from the period when Cody first appeared in such plays as The Scouts of the Prairie.

"Elvis at 21": Alfred Wertheimer Artist Interview - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Warren Perry, co-curator of "Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer" interviews Alfred Wertheimer. "Elvis at 21" is on tour; the exhibition is on view at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery from October 23, 2010 to January 23, 2010. Learn more and view selected photographs on the online exhibition: http://160.111.252.141/elvis/ In 1956, 26-year old Alfred Wertheimer was asked to photograph a rising 21-year-old-star named Elvis Presley. When Presley walked on stage that year, he altered the beat of everyday life. The world changed. Wertheimer captured the singer's transit to superstardom and the cultural transformation he helped launch. "Elvis at 21" offers viewers an intimate look at the public and private life of one of the world's most famous figures, and documents classic American life—from the diners to the train stops—in 1956. "Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer" was developed collaboratively by the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, and Govinda Gallery, and is sponsored nationally by The History Channel

"Freedom7" Mercury Spacecraft Installed at LA Convention Center

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The "Freedom7" Mercury spacecraft being moved into position at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The Convention Center was the first stop of the "America's Smithsonian" exhibition national tour celebrating the Smithsonian's 150th anniversary. The exhibition opened in Los Angeles on February 9, 1996.

"Good Old American Values" by Lula Wiles [Live at Folkways]

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Lula Wiles perform "Good Old American Values" live at the Folkways office. Their album, 'What Will We Do', comes out January 25th, 2019. Lula Wiles: http://www.lulawiles.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lulawilesband/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LulaWiles Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lulawiles/ On Tour: http://www.lulawiles.com/shows/ Smithsonian Folkways: http://www.folkways.si.edu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smithsonianfolkwaysrecordings Twitter: https://twitter.com/folkways Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/smithsonianfolkways/ The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

"I Like" Museum Tours. How About You?

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"I'm Always Chasing Rainbows"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “I’m Always Chasing Rainbows,” with music by Harry Carroll and lyrics by Joseph McCarthy. It was published by McCarthy and Fisher, Inc. in New York, New York in 1918. This song was featured in the Broadway musical Oh, Look!, with book by James Montgomery, music by Harry Carroll, and lyrics by Joseph McCarthy. Oh, Look! opened at the Vanderbilt Theater on March 7, 1918. This musical was later revised for a touring company featuring the Dolly Sisters.

"John the Rabbit" by Elizabeth Mitchell from "Sunny Day"

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Free Song Download from "Sunny Day", the new album by Elizabeth Mitchell: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=3289 In 2010, Elizabeth Mitchell and You Are My Flower released "Sunny Day", their second Smithsonian Folkways album of "handmade" music of the finest kind, for folks of all ages. "I used to sing this with my students at the Roosevelt Island Day Nursery every day. Every day! They never got tired of it, especially the part where we would do a little switcheroo and they would sing the lead and I would sing "yes ma'am!" back to them. Now it's Storey's turn!" — Elizabeth Mitchell, from the liner notes to Sunny Day A true family affair, Sunny Day features performances with Mitchell's husband and musical partner, Daniel Littleton, their nine-year-old daughter Storey, and Storey's cousins and friends. Guest performers include: - Levon Helm - Dan Zanes - Jon Langford (Mekons) - The Children of Agape Choir of South Africa Join the Smithsonian Folkways monthly newsletter to stay informed on tour dates and other announcements for Sunny Day. http://www.folkways.si.edu/explore_folkways/sunny_day.aspx The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

"John the Rabbit" by Elizabeth Mitchell from "Sunny Day"

Smithsonian Institution
Free Song Download from "Sunny Day", the new album by Elizabeth Mitchell: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=3289 On October 5th, Elizabeth Mitchell and You Are My Flower will release "Sunny Day", their second Smithsonian Folkways album of "handmade" music of the finest kind, for folks of all ages. "I used to sing this with my students at the Roosevelt Island Day Nursery every day. Every day! They never got tired of it, especially the part where we would do a little switcheroo and they would sing the lead and I would sing "yes ma'am!" back to them. Now it's Storey's turn!" — Elizabeth Mitchell, from the liner notes to Sunny Day A true family affair, Sunny Day features performances with Mitchell's husband and musical partner, Daniel Littleton, their nine-year-old daughter Storey, and Storey's cousins and friends. Guest performers include: - Levon Helm - Dan Zanes - Jon Langford (Mekons) - The Children of Agape Choir of South Africa Join the Smithsonian Folkways monthly newsletter to stay informed on tour dates and other announcements for Sunny Day. http://www.folkways.si.edu/explore_folkways/sunny_day.aspx

"Living Our Cultures" in Alaska

National Museum of Natural History
In the first arrangement of its kind, the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian loaned more than 600 Alaska artifacts to their place of origin. These cultural treasures are on display until 2017 in the exhibition "Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska" at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center located in the Anchorage Museum. Join Arctic Studies Center anthropologist Aron Crowell and Inupiaq educator Paul Ongtooguk for a tour of the exhibition and research facility in Anchorage, Alaska. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm.

"One Life: Echoes of Elvis" - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
"Echoes of Elvis," a one-room exhibition by the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, opened on on January 8, 2010, marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of Elvis Presleys birth. View the exhibit online at: http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/elvis Although Elvis died more than thirty years ago, the world remains fascinated with his image and music. His records have continued to sell by the millions and public interest in his music, career and life has yet to subside. During the last half century, Elvis became part of the country's artistic discourse as well. Early in Elviss career, Andy Warhol illuminated the role he played in the new and youth-powered popular American culture; later, Ralph Wolfe Cowan, Red Grooms, and others created mythical, spiritual, and earthly images of the man whose legacy includes multiple superlative moments in music, entertainment, life, and afterlife. To this day, both the historical Elvis Presley and the fantasy-based vision of Elvis are the subject of poetry, literature, music, film, and the visual arts. In this video, curator Warren Perry gives a short tour of the exhibit.

"Playmates"

National Museum of American History

This sheet music for the song "Playmates" was written by Harry Dacre and published by George M. Klenk & Co., in New York, New York, in 1889.

Printed on cover is "Bessie Bonehill's Great Song." Bessie Bonehill (1855-1902) was an English vaudeville singer, comedian, and male impersonator. In the 1890s, Bonehill toured throughout the United States, becoming one of the most popular entertainers of her day.

"Por Por" from Por Por: Honk Horn Music of Ghana

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The La Drivers Union Por Por Group is an organization of truck drivers in Ghana who lobby for drivers' rights and practice a form of music using honk horns and other vehicle parts. This video is composed of several songs that demonstrate the instruments and themes important to por por musicians. "Trotro Tour of Ghana" begins with an a cappella fragment of the Ghanaian national anthem, demonstrating the intense national pride of The La Drivers Union Por Por Group. "Shidaa" is a song about the history of por por and the original importance of the horns for truck drivers to scare wild animals on dark roads in the hinterland. It ends with praise for all the elders, union leaders, and workers who created and maintain the por portradition.

"Portraits Alive!" 2010: Meet the Cast - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Each summer at the National Portrait Gallery, teens from Washington, D.C. lead a theatrical tour that brings the museum's collection to life through original, student-written performances. In this video, meet the 2010 cast -- they performed in late July and early August, 2010. Generously supported by the Reinsch Family Education Endowment. Teen Ambassadors supported by the DC Department of Employment Service's Youth Employment Program.

"Portraits Alive!" 2013 -- theatrical gallery tour by teens

National Portrait Gallery
Theatrical tour by local teens that brings the Portrait Gallery's collection to life.

"Portraits Alive!" 2013: Teen Theatrical Gallery Tour - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
"Portraits Alive!" is a theatrical tour that brings the Portrait Gallery's collection to life through original, student-written performances by local teens. From the end of July through early August, the National Portrait Gallery's Education Department offers an opportunity for youth, ages 14 through 16, to perform a tour of visual biographies for visitors to the museum. Recorded at NPG, August , 2013. Music: "The Gold Lining" by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/Gold_Can_Stay/Broke_For_Free_-_Gold_Can_Stay_-_03_The_Gold_Lining https://soundcloud.com/broke-for-free Used under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) License.

"Portraits Alive!" 2015 - National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
The Portraits Alive! program is a dynamic combination of history, visual art, and performance art. Local teens lead a theatrical tour that brings the Portrait Gallery's collection to life through original, student-written performances. This program has been made possible through the generous support of the Honorable Richard Blumenthal and Mrs. Cynthia M. Blumenthal, Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation, and the Reinsch Family Education Endowment. Video Produced by Brittany Jordan Cole, New Media Intern Music: "Feel Good (Instrumental)" by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/ Used under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) License.

"Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey"

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
See the Smithsonian national traveling exhibition at the Currier Museum of Art in New Hampshire, March through August 2014. For more details about the tour, visit /www.sites.si.edu/romarebearden Courtesy New Hampshire Public Televison (NHPTV) and the Currier Museum of Art.

"Serenade," A Christmas Fantasy (La Fontaine)

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

"The Black List" with Curator Ann Shumard (Gallery Tour)

Smithsonian Education
The National Portrait Gallery’s The Black List, an exhibition of photographs by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, includes 50 portraits of contemporary African Americans. In this video, curator Ann Shumard focuses on portraits of Toni Morrison, Thelma Golden, Tyler Perry, Serena Williams, Majora Carter, Steve Stout, Susanne De Passe, and T. D. Jakes. Smithsonian Black History Month Family Day 2012 February 4, 2012 National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum

"The Dolly Sisters" Marionettes

National Museum of American History
These two dancing sisters were created and used by puppeteer Donald Cordry in his 1931 production of "The Dolly Sisters". Hand carved out of wood,the faces of the two sisters are beautifully painted with bold stylized features Both marionettes have red yarn hair and are wearing hats made of ostrich feathers. They are dressed in matching bright blue costumes,embellished with sequins and ruffles, beige tights, and blue high heeled shoes.

The story of the Dolly Sisters goes from riches and glory to despair .Identical twins Rosie and Jenny were born in Hungary (1895) , and emigrated to the United States with their parents in 1905. Talented Dancers and actresses , the sisters were considered to be as cute as "two little dollies", hence the name "Dolly Sisters" Their careers in American included performing their act in vaudeville and starring on Broadway with Ziegfield's Follies. Known for their elaborate and lavish costumes and accessories, and an outlandish life style tje sisters became a social phenomenon. They moved to England and then France. where they were courted by millionaires and royalty. But by the 1940s their looks had faded and their luck changed. One sister took her own life and the other died years later alone and in poverty.

Donald Cordry (1907-1978) was a well known and highly respected American artist, craftsmen and puppeteer of the 1920s and 30s. He was gifted with a great decorative sense and his craftsmanship was extraordinary.

Born in Minnesota, Cordry attended the Minneapolis School of Art from 1924-1929 and after graduation he went to work for the Board of Education. While his main job was to lecture and teach classes, Cordry took used the opportunity to create and perform his own marionette show with both hand puppets and marionettes.

From late 1930 to early 1931 Cordry joined the Rufus Rose Company, owned by Rupert and Margo Rose that played the school and college circuit on the East coast.

In the summer of 1931 he traveled to Mexico where he developed a life long interest and dedication to the arts and landscape of Mexico. An avid collector of ethnographic material for over 40 years, Cordry amassed a large collection of indigenous Mexican arts and crafts which he meticulously documented and researched. His passion also included Native American cultures, and in the mid 1930s he worked at the Heye Museum of Indian Art in New York City where he cataloged and researched objects for the museum.

(The Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History owns a large collection of Mexican masks donated by the Cordry family in the early 1980s.)

After returning to Minneapolis in late 1931, Cordry started creating his own puppets. He formed his own company and performed shows until 1934. The Dolly Sisters and the Three Wishes were popular with young and old audiences alike.

In June of 1934, Cordry moved to New York and worked with Tony Sarg, a well known and established puppeteer in his own right, and taught classes at Sarg's Summer School. Cordry made a number of puppets for Sarg and toured with his company from 1934-1936.

By 1937 poor health forced him to give up puppetry and he moved to Mexico. He did however, continue his field research on indigenous peoples and later on published two books - Mexican Indian Costumes (1968) and Mexican Masks (c1980).

"The Three WIshes" was Cordry's final production before he moved to Mexico with his wife. The puppets and sets from this production were shipped in crates to Mexico and remained there almost fifty years. In 1982, his widow Dorothy Mann Cordry donated this collections to the Smithsonian which included not only the marionettes, but props made to scale and a fully operational puppet stage.

"The Dolly Sisters" Marionettes

National Museum of American History
These two dancing sisters were created and used by puppeteer Donald Cordry in his 1931 production of "The Dolly Sisters".* Hand carved out of wood,the faces of the two sisters are beautifully painted with bold stylized features Both marionettes have red yarn hair and are wearing hats made of ostrich feather. They are dressed in matching bright blue costumes,embellished with sequins and ruffles, beige tights, and blue high heeled shoes.

Donald Cordry (1907-1978) was a well known and highly respected American artist, craftsmen and puppeteer of the 1920s and 30s. He was gifted with a great decorative sense and his craftsmanship was extraordinary.

Born in Minnesota, Cordry attended the Minneapolis School of Art from 1924-1929 and after graduation he went to work for the Board of Education. While his main job was to lecture and teach classes, Cordy took used the opportunity to create and perform his own marionette show with both hand puppets and marionettes.

From late 1930 to early 1931 Cordry joined the Rufus Rose Company, owned by Rupert and Margo Rose that played the school and college circuit on the East coast.

In the summer of 1931 he traveled to Mexico where he developed a life long interest and dedication to the arts and landscape of Mexico. An avid collector of ethnographic material for over 40 years, Cordy amassed a large collection of indigenous Mexican arts and crafts which he meticulously documented and researched. His passion also included Native American cultures, and in the mid 1930s he worked at the Heye Museum of Indian Art in New York City where he cataloged and researched objects for the museum.

(The Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History owns a large collection of Mexican masks donated by the Cordry family in the early 1980s.)

After returning to Minneapolis in late 1931, Cordy started creating his own puppets. He formed his own company and performed shows until 1934. The Dolly Sisters and the Three Wishes were popular with young and old audiences alike.

In June of 1934, Cordry moved to New York and worked with Tony Sarg, a well known and established puppeteer in his own right, and taught classes at Sarg's Summer School. Cordy made a number of puppets for Sarg and toured with his company from 1934-1936.

By 1937 poor health forced him to give up puppetry and he moved to Mexico. He did however, continue his field research on indigenous peoples and later on published two books - Mexican Indian Costumes (1968) and Mexican Masks (c1980).

"The Three WIshes" was Cordy's final production before he moved to Mexico with his wife. The puppets and sets from this production were shipped in crates to Mexico and remained there almost fifty years. In 1982, his widow Dorothy Mann Cordy donated this collections to the Smithsonian which included not only the marionettes, but props made to scale and a fully operational puppet stage.

The Dolly SIsters, identical twin sisters , were a popuylarimmigrants from and appeared frequently in vaudevillle and Ziegfield Follies.
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