Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(23)
(30)
(39)
(44)
(45)
(1)
(39)
(7)
(4)
(27)
(16)
(9)

Found 53 Collections

 

Ancient Civilizations

William Randolph Hearst was a wealthy media mogul who developed a love of art from a young age.  His father was a successful miner and his mother was an art collector and generous philanthropist.  After his mother took him on a year and a half long tour of  Europe when he was 10 years old he developed a lasting love of art and antiquities. He collected original works of art as well as copies all throughout his life.  In this unit you will see some of the antiquities and copies he purchased during his lifetime.  He wrote Julia Morgan a letter in 1927 that stated he saw no reason why San Simeon could not become a museum of the finest things he could secure.  His dream became a reality in 1958 when his estate in San Simeon, California was gifted to the State of California.  Hearst Castle has many fine examples of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art.  For projects and activities expand the Read More section. 

Here are a list of activities and projects you can explore after viewing the collection of images and their information.

Knowledge (Remembering)

What is the triangular part of a Greek temple called?

Name the 3 types of Greek columns.

What was the reasoning for Roman baths?

How did people feel about Egyptian Art after the discovery of King Tut’s tomb?

What is the definition of a Muse?

Comprehension (Understanding)

How would you compare the Muses to Sekhmet?  How are they alike and how are they different?

What would you consider an example of Egyptian Art from the unit on Ancient Civilization?

 Write in your journal about your favorite Greek/Roman god or goddess.

Who was Zeus?  Would you choose him for a friend?

Explain in your own words the statue Europa. Do you think she had a happy life?

Application (Applying)

Make a family tree of the Greek god/goddess on Mount Olympus.

What does Greek pottery remind you of that we use today?

Draw or paint a picture of a Roman Bath on a very busy day.

Collect 10 examples where Zeus did not act in a very godly or decent way.

 Draw a picture of the muses using clothes and attributes from today.  For example, Thalia, the muse of comedy would be carrying a movie camera to record her plays. 

Analysis (Analyzing)

 When we talk about measurements at Hearst Castle, they are given in standard measurement and metric measurement.  Why do they present both measurements?

How is Europa similar or different to Minerva?  Make a venn diagram.

What can you infer about how people felt about the Muses?

How would you deconstruct a Greek temple?

Do we still see Greek architecture in our buildings today?  Give examples, drawing, or photos.

What distinguishes ancient art from their more modern copies?

(Evaluating)

Compare how the Greeks and Romans treated their loved ones after death and how do we treat our departed today.

How would the tapestries be different if Hannibal had won the Second Punic War?

Why do you think that after all these years that the discus-thrower is considered such a fine athlete?

Why do you think that the United States has never converted to the metric system?

Justify the need for Greek Gods in Greek society.

Creating (synthesis)

Create a podcast about Sekhmet.  What is her history, how does she help the people of Egypt or does she? What would she sound like?

How would you improve Roman baths?

Create a parade floats out of a shoebox.  Each float is showing off a Greek god/goddess and their attributes. Make a parade with your friends.

Negotiate an agreement between Scipio Africanus and Hannibal.

Build a model of a Greek temple. 

Hearst Castle® & Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument
10
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from the National Museum of Korea.  Students will formulate questions about this work of art using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with videos, virtual tours, and other digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
12
 

ISS Tour

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams gives tour of the International Space Station. Four YouTube videos.

Sara Schaad
4
 

Photographer: Mydans, Carl

#nmahphc

The Carl Mydans Collection at the National Museum of American History consists of 166 photographs that span the years from the mid-1930s to the late 1960s, and two Halliburton camera cases that contain all his photographic equipment. 

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photojournalist, photojournalism, war photography, documentary photography, visual culture, picture magazines, current events, reportage, crisis photography, war coverage, Farm Security Administration, FSA, World War Two, World War II, WWII, Korean War, Life Magazine, U.S. Camera, Time Magazine

Text from PHC finding aid written by Vanessa Pares:

The photographs in the Photographic History Collection include the rural images created as part of his work for the Farm Security Administration and those taken while on assignment for LIFE magazine. In the mid-1930s, he covered cattle drives in the Big Bend, the oil boomtown of Freer and “brushhogs,” migratory workers who lived by the side of the road. A few years later, he completed the series on “sandhogs,” construction workers who built the Midtown Tunnel under the East River in New York City. 

During the 1940s, he recorded events of the Second World War, mainly in the Pacific theater. Once the war ended, he was sent to Bikini Island Atoll, an island chain in the Pacific that is part of the Marshall Islands chain. There he documented the evacuation of the people of Bikini from their home island in order to clear the way for major atomic testing, and the Bikinians' exodus to nearby Rongerik.

The rest of the collection includes portraits of major political, military, and literary figures, such as Winston Churchill, General MacArthur and William Faulkner. Carl Mydans was a storyteller. Always seeking the drama and history of a moment, his pictures are meant to recount a story with no words. Carl Mydans was born in Boston on May 20, 1907. He graduated from Boston University with a degree in journalism, after which he went on to work as a free-lance writer for the Boston Herald and the Boston Globe. While a staff writer for the American Banker, Mydans began to carry a miniature camera on his assignments.

In 1935, he carried a camera full time, joining the photographic unit of the Resettlement Administration, which merged into the Farm Security Administration in 1937. Under the supervision of Roy Stryker, a group of photographers—composed of Dorothea Lange, Walker Evens, Ben Shahn, Arthur Rothstein and Carl Mydans, among others—was sent on assignment to make a difference by reporting and documenting the plight of the poor farmer. Their task was to create a “pictorial history” of agriculture and focus on those most affected by the Great Depression. The photographers would tour the nation and interpret it through the shape of the land and the faces of the unemployed, the migrant farmers, and the sharecroppers. During this time, Mydans documented cotton production in the southeastern states, the impoverished dwellings of New England, and the creation of new “greenbelt towns” or government-sponsored planned communities. 

In 1936, Mydans left the FSA and was hired by the newly established LIFE magazine. One of his first assignments for LIFE was a photo essay on Texas, focusing mainly on the oil boomtown of Freer. It was also at this time that he met Shelley Smith, a LIFE researcher and journalist whom he married the following year. Once World War II broke out, the couple was sent to Europe as a reporter-photographer team. At first they went to England, covering London under siege, then to Sweden, and then to Finland, where Mydans had his first combat experience. The couple later traveled to Italy to cover Fascism, to France to witness its defeat, to Pearl Harbor to photograph American naval operations, and then to China. When the attack on Pearl Harbor occured, Carl and his wife were in Manila, the Philippines. Early in 1942, the Philippines were invaded by the Japanese and the couple was imprisoned. After almost nine months of captivity, they were moved from Santo Tomas University—an internment camp for civilians—to Shanghai. On December 1943, the couple, along with 1,400 American and Canadian citizens, was repatriated. Although Mydans was unable to cover the war, he was grateful to have survived and continue to watch and photograph all the events that encompassed his life. Soon after his return to the States, he was sent back to the European front. 

In 1944, he accompanied Allied forces to Italy where he covered the campaigns in Monte Cassino and Rome. After Italy, Mydans traveled to Marseilles to cover the fighting in southern France. Following the liberation of France, he was rushed back to the South Pacific to rejoin Gen. Douglas MacArthur for his triumphant return to the Philippines. Three weeks after the invasion of Luzon, Mydans took part in the charge into Manila—which concluded with the liberation of the remaining 4,000 civilian captives in Santo Tomas—alongside the 8th Cavalry Regiment. Months later, on September 2, 1945, Mydans was one of the few privileged photojournalists to be present at the site of the official Japanese surrender on the U.S.S. Missouri. After the Second World War, the Mydans took up residence in Tokyo, where he worked as chief editor of the TIME-LIFE news bureau. During those years, he captured the earthquake at Fukui, the Communist Revolution in China, and the war in Korea. 

In 1950, while on a trip to New York, Mydans received word of the outbreak of the Korean war. It only took him ten days to get himself shipped back into battle. Later that year, he received a Gold Achievement Award from U.S. Camera for his coverage of the Korean conflict. After the war, Mydans completed assignments in England, Berlin, and Russia, and traveled to Vietnam in 1968 to do a story on refugees. After the closing of LIFE, he continued to work as a photojournalist with TIME magazine, and wrote books based on his experiences at war. Mydans died on August 16, 2004.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
42
 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Virtual Tour

Take a virtual tour of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on-site art installations.

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
57
 

Castle Tour

Building a collection to share with Castle visitors who either take a tour or just express interest in Smithsonian/Castle history.
Michael Rubin
38
 

History of Jazz

April is Jazz Appreciation Month! To celebrate this month we're going to take a look into the history of jazz and the processes that are involved with a tour through the Smithsonian. Start with the video of "What is Jazz?" and by reading the articles "Meet the Titans" both parts 1 and 2. Then pick a musician that you would like to explore further and do the activity with that musician in a doc. 

Kellie Daino
9
 

DCPS Rocks and Minerals Cornerstone

Grade 4: Rocks and Minerals

Rocks and minerals play an important role in the natural world and human society. This collection will allow you to step into the role of a museum geologist and help you learn how to closely examine a museum specimen. To start, look through the 12 specimens to learn more about their unique properties. Select your favorite and use your new knowledge to complete the student worksheet. 

Additional Resources in this Learning Lab

Videos

  • Rock Types: This short video with geologist Dr. Ben Andrews will take you through the 3 types of rocks.
  • Mineral Dependence: Gemstones to Cellphones: In this 30 minute video, Dr. Mike Wise will teach you about unusual rocks called pegmatites and the large mineral crystals they contain. Find out how you depend on pegmatites for everyday uses, such as operating your cellphone.

Tours 

  • Coming soon! A narrated virtual tour of the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, and Minerals. Until then, click here for a self-guided virtual exploration of the hall!
Nicole Webster
17
 

Castle Tour

Anne-Marie experimenting in Learning Lab for future projects.

Anne-Marie Gilliland
12
 

Jazz and the Machine

How did artists and designers "picture" the kinetic sounds of American Jazz? In what ways did jazz music and dance forms become commodified, and even used as a touristic experience for middle-class Americans and international listeners? And, most importantly, how did these musical forms propagate a new creative culture during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond? Find out on this short tour of paintings, prints, ceramics, musical instruments, and sound recordings. 

Katie Anania
9
 

Photographer: Muybridge, Eadweard

Photographic History Collection: Eadweard Muybridge

#nmahphc

This is a small sampling of Eadweard Muybridge Collections in the Photographic History Collection.  The collection contains stereoviews, a Yosemite portfolio printed by Chicago Albumen Works, collotypes, cyanotype proof prints, glass plate positives, Zoopraxiscope glass plates, lantern slides, a timing device, a patent model, shutter, and more.

For more, search collections.si.edu. 

Keywords:  stop action, stop motion, freeze frame, motion picture, cyanotypes, stereographs, Yosemite, Modoc Wars, California history, University of Pennsylvania, science and photography

See also the online exhibition at the National Museum of American History, Freeze Frame, https://americanhistory.si.edu/exhibitions/freeze-frame-eadweard-muybridge%E2%80%99s-photography-motion



Expatriate Englishman Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904), a brilliant and eccentric photographer, gained worldwide fame photographing animal and human movement imperceptible to the human eye. Hired by railroad baron Leland Stanford in 1872, Muybridge used photography to prove that there was a moment in a horse’s gallop when all four hooves were off the ground at once. He spent much of his later career at the University of Pennsylvania, producing thousands of images that capture progressive movements within fractions of a second.

By the 1860s, Eadweard Muybridge, born Edward James Muggeridge in Kingston-upon-Thames, England, had reinvented himself as Helios, one of San Francisco’s most important landscape photographers. His fame brought him to the attention of Leland Stanford, former governor of California, who hired Muybridge to get a picture that would settle a hotly debated issue: Is there a moment in a horse’s gait when all four hooves are off the ground at once? Muybridge took up the challenge in 1872. In 1878, he succeeded in taking a sequence of photographs with 12 cameras that captured the moment when the animal’s hooves were tucked under its belly. Publication of these photographs made Muybridge an international celebrity.

It took six years to produce the photographs Stanford sought. Muybridge’s experiments were interrupted in 1874 when he went on trial for the murder of his wife’s lover. Acquitted on grounds of justifiable homicide, he spent two years photographing in Central America before returning to Stanford’s farm. In 1878, Muybridge finally succeeded in photographing the horse in motion.

Muybridge used the wet plate process, a relatively slow method of photography. The resulting images were hardly more than silhouettes, but they showed what had never before been seen by the unaided eye.

Eadweard Muybridge traveled to Europe for a lecture tour in the fall of 1881. In Paris, Etienne-Jules Marey introduced him to the artistic and scientific luminaries of the age. This triumphal tour inspired Muybridge to seek additional funding to undertake an even more complex investigation into animal and human locomotion.

In the summer of 1883, the University of Pennsylvania agreed to fund such a project. University Provost Dr. William Pepper placed the grounds of the new Veterinary Department at Muybridge’s disposal, and a university committee was formed to oversee the project. Muybridge began making photographs in the spring of 1884.

Muybridge photographed his subjects moving in front of a black wall marked off with a grid of white threads. He used up to 36 lenses with 12 to 24 cameras, placed at 30-, 60-, and 90-degree angles to his subjects. The two cameras placed at 30- and 60-degrees were able to hold up to 12 lenses each. The 90-degree angle was known as the lateral, or parallel, view, while the others Muybridge referred to as the front and rear foreshortenings. With this set-up, a successful session could result in as many as 36 negatives.

The Cyanotypes
Muybridge’s cyanotypes are working proofs, the contact prints he made from the more than 20,000 negatives he took at the University of Pennsylvania. Since the original negatives no longer exist, the cyanotypes provide us with the opportunity to see the pictures Muybridge really made, before he edited and cropped them for publication.

The Process Muybridge used up to 36 lenses with 12 to 24 cameras, placed at 30-, 60-, and 90-degree angles to his subjects. The two cameras placed at 30- and 60-degrees were able to hold up to 12 lenses each. The 90-degree angle was known as the lateral, or parallel, view, while the others Muybridge referred to as the front and rear foreshortenings. With this set-up, a successful session could result in as many as 36 negatives.

Muybridge contact-printed his negatives as cyanotypes, the working proofs.

Using these cyanotypes as his guide, he enlarged each negative onto a separate piece of glass and assembled these positives into large glass plate composites (C). From these composites, the Photogravure Company, New York, produced a gelatin negative. The final print, called a collotype, was printed in ink from a plate prepared from this negative.

Over 800 sets of proofs exist in the unique collection found in the Photographic History Collection of the National Museum of American History. Comparisons between Muybridge’s working cyanotype proofs and his final collotype prints prove that he freely reprinted, cropped, deleted, or substituted negatives to make the assemblage of 781 collotypes in the portfolio Animal Locomotion. The Muybridge cyanotypes may be found in the online exhibit Freeze Frame: Eadweard Muybridge’s Photography of Motion.

The collection also includes prints from Muybridge’s five-month trip to the Yosemite Valley in 1867, which yielded 260 published views, 160 of them stereographs. His were among the most celebrated images taken of the Valley. By the late 1860s, the widespread circulation of Yosemite images had made the region a mythic American landscape, redolent of the grandeur, expansiveness, and power Americans had come to associate with the West and, by extension, the nation as a whole.

For more information on Eadweard Muybridge in the Smithsonian Collection see:

https://americanhistory.si.edu/muybridge/index.htm

http://collections.si.edu/search/results.htm?q=Muybridge%2C+Eadweard+cyanotypes

https://americanart.si.edu/artist/eadweard-muybridge-3475

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/how-19th-century-photographer-first-gif-galloping-horse-180970990/



NMAH Photographic History Collection
18
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Jessica Radovich
73
 

Journey through an Exploded Star: An Online Interactive

In this collection, students will explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space. They'll explore real data that provides evidence for the dispersal of several elements produced by the explosion of massive stars, specifically through the Cassiopeia A supernova. Then they’ll put their knowledge into practice by navigating the remains of the supernova in the online interactive “Journey through an Exploded Star.”

  1. The activity begins with “DISCOVER." The students will go through a series of slides, learning first how the visible spectrum of light is only a small part of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, about the different telescopes scientists use to view the electromagnetic radiation across that spectrum, and finally how they've used that data to form a composite view of our universe, specifically through a 3D model of the Cassiopeia A supernova.
  2. In the "EXPLORE" activity, students examine the 3D visualization of data, compiled by astrophysicist Tracey DeLaney, to understand how and why scientists study supernovas such as Cassiopeia A: to gain a comprehensive picture of the cosmos.
  3. The “PLAY” online interactive then takes the students on a first-person flight through the center of this exploded star. The interactive is split into two parts: The first part is a 2 minute guided fly-through, where Kim Arcand, project lead of the original 3D visualization found in the collection, explains the different forms of light and the elements that are traceable under those spectrums. The second is a free explore option, where students are able to manipulate the different spectrums by adjusting filters as they choose. Both parts of the interactive reinforce what they’ve previously learned within the collection about light across the EMS. This interactive works across browsers and requires no software downloads. Also included is a 360 video tour that works on mobile devices and Google Cardboard.
  4. Finally, three extension activities are included. The first allows students to take photographs using real MicroObservatory robotic telescopes located at Smithsonian Observatory sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Amado, Arizona to create their very own authentic astrophotographs. They’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. The second, "Recoloring the Universe," is a suite of resources that use astrophysical data to teach basic coding. The third resource, "How to Be a Scientist: Careers in Astronomy" highlights the career and data visualization work of astronomer Kimberly Arcand. 

This online activity could be used to augment study about the forms of radiation light can take, learning about supernovae and what happens after a star explodes, as well as learning about some of the different careers in science that are available (astrophysicists, astrophotographers, engineers, and visualization experts). As with all Learning Lab collections, it is built to be freely modified and adapted to fit your specific needs. 

Jessica Radovich
22
 

Virtual Tours

A tour of six different ecosystems.

Randi Miller
3
 

Virginia History Tour

From Jamestown to the present, explore some of the people, places and events that tell the story of the history of Virginia. 

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Nancy Butler
56
 

African American History Month Family Festival: Interviews, Performances, Highlights

This collections comes from a African American History Month family festival created to complement the exhibition, "The Black List." Included here are a gallery tour with curator Ann Shumard, and interviews with puppeteer Schroeder Cherry, guitarist Warner Williams, the Taratibu Youth Association Step Dance Group, silhouette artist Lauren Muney and collage artist Michael Albert.

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

Military History at La Purisima Mission

Come along and explore the military history behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the soldiers at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
18
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer and Sackler Galleries
114
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
 

La Purisima Mission Church

Come along and explore the Church History behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the Church at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
28
 

East Asian Numismatics in 3D!

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than 3,000 years of human history. The NNC holds an expansive collection of East Asian coins with notable objects from China, Korea, and Japan. Indeed, many of the earliest donations to the Smithsonian in the 19th century were East Asian coins and paper currencies. They include a set of coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant by the Japanese Meiji Emperor during Grant’s world tour. Grant’s widow, Julia Dent Grant, donated the unique gift to the museum in 1886. Shortly after, the estate of collector George Bunker Glover bequeathed more than 2,025 pieces of East Asian currency to the Smithsonian. Growth of the NNC’s East Asian collection continued in the 20th century with significant donations from The Chase Manhattan Money Museum,  the descendants of collector Alexander I. Pogrebetsky, and the estate of collector Josiah K. Lilly Jr. Today the NNC continues to grow its East Asian holdings. In 2017 the NNC received 473 objects from the Howard F. Bowker Collection. Thanks to the generous support of the Howard F. Bowker Family, Michael Chou, and the Smithsonian’s 3D Program, the NNC’s East Asian holdings are accessible online, with a selection available in 3D!


Emily Pearce Seigerman
10
 

La Purisima Mission Tour

Discover the history behind La Purisima Mission State Historic Park!  Explore the vast history by examining the signage and displays of the Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
85
 

La Purisima Mission Visitor Center

Explore the wonders behind the La Purisima Mission Visitor Center!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
41
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
73
1-24 of 53 Collections