Skip to Content

Found 41,595 Resources

Land Survey

National Museum of American History

Survey

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Aerial view of a landscape in gray, brown, black, yellow and white.

survey instrument pieces

National Museum of American History

meter, scintillation survey

National Museum of American History

Survey Savvy

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson plan in which students conduct a survey to gather information about the viewpoints of the exhibition Design for the Other 90%. They present their findings to the class.

Hayden Survey Party, 1872

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Group portrait from 1872 of the Hayden Yellowstone survey party (United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, 1871-1877). William Henry Holmes and F.V. Hayden are included in the group.

Survey boat GRAND

National Museum of American History
Grand is one of four boats used to survey the "ruggedest" 300 miles of the Colorado River's Grand Canyon during the 1923 expedition by the U.S. Geological Survey. Led by Col. Claude Birdseye, the expedition's primary purpose was to survey potential dam sites for the development of hydroelectric power. Indeed, the survey party mapped twenty-one new sites.

Grand is eighteen feet long, with a beam of four feet, eleven inches. Heavily built of oak, spruce, and cedar, the boat weighs about 900 pounds. Grand is one of three boats ordered in 1921 by the survey's sponsors, the Edison Electric Company, and built at the Fellows and Stewart Shipbuilding Works in San Pedro. The vessels were patterned after those designed by the Kolb brothers, who had based their boats on vessels used by trappers in the upper Colorado River canyons.

Members of Survey Team with the United States Biological Survey

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Eight men, who are members of the United States Bureau of Biological Survey team, are in the field doing a survey. Saddled horses stand nearby. The Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of Interior and its predecessor, the Bureau of Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture, had naturalists conduct field research throughout the greater part of the Western Hemisphere in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Miocene / Maryland Geological Survey

Smithsonian Libraries
Second of a series of reports dealing with the systematic geology and palaeontology of Maryland.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Leewards Survey 19, June 1967

Smithsonian Field Book Project
This record refers to 5 field books from the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, Leewards Survey 19. Envelope 1 contains a field book by R. W. Tuxson that includes bird banding lists (587-80237 to 993-41500) and bird population counts. Envelope 2 contains a field book by by F. C. Thompson, and is labeled Banding Book II. It lists bird banding numbers 615-18209 to 943-19723. Envelope 3 contains a field book by D. L. Stadel that includes bird population counts; banding numbers 615-06375 to 993-43500; and a list of nest observations, including vegetation surroundings. Envelope 4 contains a field book by Ron Amerson and includes bird band numbers 568-70101 to 943-12332. Envelope 5 contains a book containing one list of egg measurements (length and width). No author is indicated on the book.

Leewards Survey 19, June 1967

Smithsonian Field Book Project
This record refers to 3 field books from the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, Leewards Survey 19. Envelope 1 contains a field book by Robert L. DeLong including chick and adult bird counts; field notes with nesting observations; and bird banding lists with band numbers 705-14501 to 993-5000. Envelope 2 contains a field book by R. W. Tuxson that includes bird banding lists with numbers 587-80452 to 993-44001; bird population survey; botanical survey; and a list of plants utilized by bird species. Envelope 3 contains a field book by Dennis L. Stadel that includes bird nest counts; egg measurements (length and width); checklists of materials used in nest construction; and bird banding lists with numbers 587-80425 to 903-89535.

Hayden Survey Group, 1877

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See A. Hunter Dupree's volume on Asa Gray, pp. 406-408.

Hayden Survey Group (United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, 1871-1877) seated at a field luncheon table outside a tent. L to R: unknown; Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker; unknown; Asa Gray; Mrs. Strachey; Mrs. Asa Gray; unknown; Dr. Lambourne; James Stevenson; Lt. Gen. Sir Richard Strachey, R.E.; Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden; unknown. Black servant stands to the right of the group. Hooker, president of the Royal Society of London, was making a botanical tour of the United States with Professor Asa Gray of Harvard. Gray and Hooker subsequently published an essay on the geographical distribution of plants in the Rockies, a reflection in their interest in Darwinian evolution. Specimens from the survey were deposited at the Smithsonian Institution.

"Survey Team" Windbreaker

National Museum of American History
Yellow windbreaker that reads "Survey Team" used in field surveys of breath alcohol detection devices.

Bulletin - Biological Survey

Smithsonian Libraries
At head of title: United States Department of agriculture.

No more published.

Also available online.

No. 1 issued by Division of economic ornithology and mammalogy; no. 2 by Division of economic ornithology; no. 3-8 by Division of ornithology and mammalogy; no. 9-18 by Division of biological survey; no. 19-31 by Biological survey.

Later bulletins emanating from this bureau are contained in the series of Bulletins of the Department of agriculture.

Elecresource

Planetary Nebula Survey

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
A planetary nebula is a phase of stellar evolution that the sun should experience several billion years from now, when it expands to become a red giant.

Hawaii Biological Survey

Smithsonian Libraries

Wheeler Survey Members

National Portrait Gallery
Standing in the top row, sixth from the left, with a long beard and thinning hair, is George M. Wheeler, the West Point graduate who in 1871 developed a comprehensive plan for surveying the territory west of the hundredth meridian. For the next eight years Wheeler led a group of soldiers and civilians that surveyed nearly 360,000 square miles, roughly one-third of the mountainous West. The Wheeler Survey accumulated a vast quantity of information regarding the region's geology, botany, and ethnology. Most significantly, they published maps-164 in all-that covered nearly all the land through which the survey party had traveled. The creation of the U.S. Geological Survey in 1879 effectively ended Wheeler's work in the West. This photograph, taken outside Wheeler's Washington, D.C., office, depicts many of the men who served with him. The photographer Timothy O'Sullivan-who accompanied Wheeler for three seasons-stands in the bottom row at the left.

Hayden Survey Party

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also number SIA_007177_B14_F04_I01

See also number SPI_1493

This image was taken as part of the Hayden Survey of western Wyoming and Colorado, which later led to the formation of the U.S. Geological Surveys of the Territories within the Department of the Interior. William Henry Jackson, then a budding photographer, took thousands of photographs for the Hayden Survey, most notably the first images of the headwaters of the Yellowstone River. Pictured is the survey group, most of them sitting around an object in Yellowstone Park, at the Lower Geyser Basin. Numbers identify people in the image: 1. Gannett; 2. Peale; 3. Savage; 4. [no name]; 5. William Henry Holmes; 6. Bingham; 7. Hovey; 8. Wakefield; 9. Sloane; 10. Brown; 11. William Logan.

Diagram of Survey

National Museum of American History
This engraved wood block was used to print an image in the publication "Narrative of the U.S. Exploring Expedition, During the Years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842," 1844, Volume 1 (page 431 of the Lea & Blanchard stereotyped copy). The image was drawn by J. Drayton. It was engraved by J. H. Brightly, and originally printed by C. Sherman of Philadelphia in 1844.

Transiting exoplanet survey satellite

Smithsonian Insider

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite project is one of 11 proposals recently accepted for evaluation as potential future science missions by NASA. Each project will […]

The post Transiting exoplanet survey satellite appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

Hayden Survey Mounted Party

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Alligator Mess, Hayden Survey

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also number SPI_1490

See also number 87-1884

This image was taken as part of the Hayden Survey of western Wyoming and Colorado, which later led to the formation of the U.S. Geological Surveys of the Territories within the Department of the Interior. William Henry Jackson, then a budding photographer, took thousands of photographs for the Hayden Survey, most notably the first images of the headwaters of the Yellowstone River. Pictured is the survey group gathered around a table. Four of the men are numbered, with corresponding names in the caption below the image: 1. John Raymond, Cook; 2. Campbell Carrington; 3. Mr. Dixon; 4. William Logan.

Volunteers for Visitor Survey

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 67404.

Digital contact sheet available.

Volunteers for visitor survey with Director General of Museums Frank A. Taylor.

Australia survey maps, Walmar

National Museum of American History
1-24 of 41,595 Resources