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Found 11,116 Resources

plane, sun

National Museum of American History

plane, sun

National Museum of American History

bonnet, sun

National Museum of American History

dial, sun

National Museum of American History

Sun Shade

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
LARGE COCONUT PALM LEAF WHICH IS NEARLY CIRCULAR IN SHAPE. THE EDGES ARE SEWN AROUND A VINE OR THIN BRANCH WHICH HAS BEEN TIED IN A CIRCLE. THE STEM OF THE LEAF IS THE HANDLE, AND IT IS UNDECORATED. EXHIBITED MAGNIFICENT VOYAGERS, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, 1985-86. THE SUN SHADE WAS T-12297, BUT THE ORIGINAL CATALOGUE NUMBER WAS READ UNDER ULTRA VIOLET LIGHT.

Peale catalogue identifies # 1897 - 1900 as "Sunshades: made of palm leaf and used by Chiefs only: Fiji Islands."

Palm frond with handle formed by bending up stem. Edges bound with three woody fibers on each side attached to the palm with sennit braid. Shape is large, pointed oval.

Sun Shade

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
LARGE COCONUT PALM LEAF WHICH IS NEARLY CIRCULAR IN SHAPE. THE EDGES ARE SEWN AROUND A VINE OR THIN BRANCH WHICH HAS BEEN TIED IN A CIRCLE. THE STEM OF THE LEAF IS THE HANDLE, AND THIS IS WRAPPED TIGHTLY IN A PATTERN WITH FINE BRAIDED COCONUT FIBER CORD. MARKS: WRITTEN ON FAN ACCORDING TO OLD CATALOG CARD, "COLLECTED BY LT. WALKER. THIS FAN WAS NOT IN ANY BUNDLE VINCENNES. 44." EXAMINED BY KENNETH P. EMORY, BISHOP MUSEUM, JUNE 24, 1941. THIS OBJECT WAS ON PERMANENT EXHIBIT IN THE PACIFIC HALL, 1989 [exhibit dismantled in 2004].

FROM CARD: "3233-4. #3233, ORIG. 1899. FAN OF SINGLE PALM LEAF. 22" LONG OF WHICH HANDLE IS 3", 21" WIDE. (THIS INFORMATION GIVEN BY K. P. EMORY, BISHOP MUSEUM, 6/24/41). THIS FAN BORE ON ITS FACE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IN INK, WHICH WAS REMOVED WHEN THE FAN WAS PLACED ON EXHIBIT MAY 25, 1962: "COLLECTED BY LT. WALKER. THIS FAN WAS NOT IN ANY BUNDLE VINCENNES. 44."

Formerly on exhibit in NMNH Pacific Cultures Exhibit Hall 8, case 40, 1962 - 2004, where exhibit label identified as "chief's fan."

Peale catalogue identifies # 1897 - 1900 as "Sunshades: made of palm leaf and used by Chiefs only: Fiji Islands."

Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sun

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
1993-151-261 is a duplicate of 1993-151-260. Data are entered in the 1993-151-260 record.

Sun

National Museum of the American Indian

Sun Feather

Catalog of American Portraits

Little Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
LED lamp in the shape of a sun with ten petal components and backed with a solar panel

Black Sun Coral, Black Sun Coral

NMNH - Education & Outreach
This object is part of the Education and Outreach collection, some of which are in the Q?rius science education center and available to see.

Sun-Dry & Sun-Cook

National Museum of American History

Sun Today, Sun Tomorrow; Sun Yesterday?

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created design lesson in which students consider the uses of solar energy.They learn how to track and measure the sun's radiance and study ways that past civilizations have harnessed the sun's energy.

The Sun: Sunday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

The front page above-the-waist photograph of an open-mouthed, smiling young woman in a bathing suit; and behind her, a bare-chested young man, also smiling,

is captioned: Nashville's Rita "Grouper" Kieson once placed an entire regulation softball in her mouth, and still managed to eat two pigs-in-a-blanket and a tabouli salad.

The Sun: Wednesday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

In this issue, the front page head shot of a smiling young woman is captioned: A typical Dalton, Ga. gal, Kay Manly has brushed her teeth once an hour/ since Jimmy

Carter left the White House. A hat-band major, she is now a con-/ tributing editor to Dental Floss Monthly.

The Sun: Saturday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

A typical example of this style of humor features a front page photograph of six smiling college students, captioned: A band of Cannibalistic Karankawa Indians, long thought/ to be extinct, were spotted on the beach of South Padre/ Island wearing war paint and looking totally unfierce.

The Sun: Wednesday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on Page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

The headline, Erin Go Fla!, imprinted in bold, bright green, sans serif type, a pun on the Irish saying, Erin go bragh (Ireland forever), introduces the St. Patrick's day holiday (March 17th) theme. Further illustrating the Irish theme are the sub-headline, Beach Goes Green, in a smaller, but bold, black, sans serif font, and the head shot of two smiling young women, identified in the caption as "Curvaceous colleens,"

The Sun: Thursday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

The front page above-the-waist photograph features two smiling young women. Their heads are touching, and the upraised outer arm of the one on the left is bent around the neck of the other. The caption reads: Tag-team wrestlers from Kansas Kendra McMullen and Dorothy Wilson. Squeeze Till it Hurts.

The Sun: Tuesday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger & Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

The Sun: Saturday Sun

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The present object is one in a series of The Sun, a humorous tabloid newspaper published in Florida and marketed to college students on spring break in the Fort Lauderdale-Daytona Beach area. The publication's motto, Take This News and Love it, imprinted on page one underneath the edition title, establishes the satirical thrust of the paper. The design format comprises photographs of the vacationing population, along with captions and text mocking both the subjects and their activities; beach-themed cartoons, such as Digger and Lunk Beach Bozos; articles about entertainers popular among the targeted readers; Dear Abby, a nationally syndicated advice column by Abigail Van Buren; and Camel cigarette advertisements.

In this issue, a front page above-the-waist photograph of a smiling, long-haired young woman is captioned: Going bald? Bianca Baker of Los Angeles was slick as a cue ball till she/ started using Taylor's Malted Fish Emulsion for her conditioner. No longer/ blinding her chums on the beach, Bianca is now running for President.
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