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Storytelling: Gene Tagaban (Interview)

Smithsonian Education
Storyteller Gene Tagaban, of Tlingit, Cherokee, and Filipino heritage, talks about the importance of storytelling as a tool to teach, entertain, and heal. Smithsonian American Indian Heritage Month Family Day 2013: Raven Steals the Sun – A Family Celebration of Tlingit Culture November 9-10, 2013 National Museum of the American Indian

The "Art" of Storytelling

Smithsonian Magazine

Spooky Storytelling for Halloween

National Museum of the American Indian
In the spirit of Halloween, join the museum's Cultural Interpreters for a special storytelling session focused on scary stories told among Native families and friends. BEWARE! These stories may set your hair on end and keep you looking over your shoulder. This webcast comes to you from the museum's family-friendly imagiNATIONS Activity Center.

Native Storytelling: Thirza Defoe

National Museum of the American Indian
Grammy-winning artist, performer, and storyteller Thirza Defoe shares traditional Ojibwe and Oneida stories, not only with words but also with music, song, and dance. You may even get to meet Grandma Quay and hear some of her stories as well!

Spooky Storytelling for Halloween

National Museum of the American Indian
In the spirit of Halloween, join the museum's Cultural Interpreter Rachael Cassidy for a special storytelling session focused on scary stories told among Native families and friends. BEWARE! These stories may set your hair on end and keep you looking over your shoulder. Originally webcast from the imagiNATIONS Activity Center of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC, on October 31, 2012.

Talking Heads: Storytelling Giant

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Recto: A reproduction of a painting of a face, partial frontal view, beginning about an inch from the top, continues to the bottom edge, ending just below the lips. The eyes are dark and reflect pinpoints of light, the brows are heavy, the nose is shadowed on the proper right, and the full lips are pale pink. Talking Heads, imprinted in blue capitals on the right above the nose, ends at the right edge. The video title, in smaller red capitals, is imprinted vertically near the left edge in the space between the lower eyelid and the upper lip.

Side panels: The face continues on the side panels, with the eyes and brows ending at the verso edges. Talking Heads, again in blue capitals, is imprinted on two lines on each panel. In the right panel, the facial flesh extends beyond the verso edge into the verso, and the video title is imprinted in red in the same format as on the recto. In the left panel, the facial area below the eye ends in a curve against a dark brown background, and the album title, again in small red capitals, is imprinted in a curve following the facial edge.

Verso: The flesh tone of the facial portrait continues on the left (see Side Panels, above); the video title is imprinted on the right of the this top left section and the names of the band personnel, followed by Talking Heads,

are imprinted slightly below to the left. A narrative description of the video content completes this section. The story titles, in white type on a brown background (which might depict the hair of the portrait subject), are listed vertically on the right. In about two thirds of the space in the lower half, there is reproduction of a 1930's black and white photograph of a man, woman, teenage boy and younger girl standing in a row; an actual male giant, his hands on the shoulders of the two end figures in the front row, is standing behind them. Everyone is smiling; they appear to be a family group. Part of a house with a peaked roof is on the left behind the group and trees in leaf are on the right. Brief biographical facts about the giant are imprinted on six lines in small black type to the left of the photograph. Production data in white on a brown rectangle, which overlays part of the photograph, is on the left bottom.

Top flap: Where the lower edge of the flap meets the recto, Talking Heads in blue capitals, followed by the video title in red, are imprinted in small capitals. The flap closes in the direction of the verso.

Sugpiaq Storytelling with Ed Tiulana

National Museum of the American Indian
Ed Tiulana (Inupiaq/Tlingit) offers an authentic Alaskan storytelling experience.. Since childhood, he has studied traditional Native dance and has since performed with Alaska's King Island Dance group throughout the United States, South Korea and South America. This performance took place on January 18, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

Beatrice Birra Storytelling at African Art Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Beatrice Birra dressed in traditional African clothing tells stories to an audience of children at the National Museum of African Art.

Graphic Design Meetup: Design is Storytelling

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image of Adam Kesner, Minister of Information at Trivial Dispute leads a group in a trivia game at Cooper HewittTest your knowledge and explore the role of storytelling in the design process in a delightful evening of short talks and trivial disputes. Cooper Hewitt curator Ellen Lupton discusses her new book, Design Is Storytelling, a guide to narrative thinking for designers. Also on deck: Peter Mendelsund, a brilliant graphic designer and prolific writer who brings...

Cherokee Storytelling with Gayle Ross 2

National Museum of the American Indian
Gayle Ross (Cherokee Nation) shares stories of her culture. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich heritage that Ross's storytelling springs. During the past 25 years, Ross has become one of the best loved and most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form. This is the second of two storytelling sessions that was webcast from the National Museum of the American Indian imagiNATIONS Activity Center on August 9, 2013.

Cherokee Storytelling with Gayle Ross 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Gayle Ross (Cherokee Nation) shares stories of her culture. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich heritage that Ross's storytelling springs. During the past 25 years, Ross has become one of the best loved and most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form. This is the first of two storytelling sessions that was webcast from the National Museum of the American Indian imagiNATIONS Activity Center on August 9, 2013.

Touch My Tears: A Choctaw Storytelling Concert

National Museum of the American Indian
Author and storyteller Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) of the museum's Artist Leadership Program as she presents tales from the past and present to entertain the audience and share the unique culture of the Choctaw people.

Touch My Tears: A Choctaw Storytelling Concert

National Museum of the American Indian
Author and storyteller Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) of the museum's Artist Leadership Program presents tales from the past and present to entertain the audience and share the unique culture of the Choctaw people.

Storytelling: Shelly Laws (Performance and Interview)

Smithsonian Education
Shelly Laws (Tlingit) talks about storytelling in Tlingit culture. Smithsonian American Indian Heritage Month Family Day 2013: Raven Steals the Sun – A Family Celebration of Tlingit Culture November 9-10, 2013 National Museum of the American Indian

Touch My Tears: A Choctaw Storytelling Concert

National Museum of the American Indian
Author and storyteller Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) of the museum's Artist Leadership Program presents tales from the past and present to entertain the audience and share the unique culture of the Choctaw people.

Cherokee Days 2014: Storytelling with Robert Lewis

National Museum of the American Indian
Robert Lewis tells two uplifting audience-participation stories centered around a rabbit, that focus on following your dreams and being a leader instead of following the crowd. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on April 5, 2014.

Superhero Comic Book and Movie Storytelling

Smithsonian Magazine
Watch a course video excerpt from Rise of the Superheroes: The legendary Stan Lee, creator of the Avengers, Spiderman and Iron Man, has partnered with the Smithsonian National Museum of American History to launch the first global online course about superheroes to fans around the world. Register now: smithsonian.com/edx/superheroes

Graphic Design Meetup: Design is Storytelling

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Test your knowledge and explore the role of storytelling in the design process in a delightful evening of short talks and trivial disputes. Cooper Hewitt curator Ellen Lupton discusses her new book, "Design Is Storytelling," a guide to narrative thinking for designers. Also on deck: Peter Mendelsund, a brilliant graphic designer and prolific writer who brings stories to life with his iconic book covers, and Dan Venne, a creative director and lead producer at Man Made Music, who designed original audio content for Cooper Hewitt’s interactive exhibition "Hear, See, Play: Designing with Sound." Overseeing the evening’s festivities is Adam Kesner, Minister of Information at Trivial Dispute. Throughout the evening Kesner will plie the audience with design trivia challenges and there will be a book signing with Lupton and Mendelsund. Featuring… Adam Kesner, Minister of Information, Trivial Dispute Ellen Lupton, Curator of Contemporary Design, Cooper Hewitt Peter Mendelsund, author and designer Dan Venne, sound designer, Man Made Music For more information, visit us online at https://www.cooperhewitt.org/event/graphic-design-meetup-design-is-storytelling-12-05-2017/

The Art of Storytelling: Walan Amana 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian celebrates storytelling with Maidu communities from Northern California. In this segment, Walan Amana, a musical group that grew out of a language studies program, perform both traditional and contemporary songs in the Concow-Maidu language. Program director Alan Wallace introduces the group members Lindsay Arbaugh, Austin Arista, and Travis Lang. This is the second of two performances given by the group on the second day of the festival. The program was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 28, 2016.

The Art of Storytelling: Paul Cason 1

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian celebrates storytelling with Maidu communities from Northern California. In this segment, Maidu language keeper Paul Cason tells the Maidu creation story with the help of members of the audience. This is the first of two performances by him for the second day of the festival. This program was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 28, 2016.

The Art of Storytelling: Walan Amana 1

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian celebrates storytelling with Maidu communities from Northern California. In this segment, Walan Amana, a musical group that grew out of a language studies program, perform both traditional and contemporary songs in the Concow-Maidu language. Program director Alan Wallace introduces the group members Lindsay Arbaugh, Austin Arista, and Travis Lang. This is the first of two performances given by the group on the second day of the festival. The program was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on February 28, 2016.

Cherokee Days 2017 - Storytelling by Robert Lewis

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fourth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, Cherokee National Treasure Robert Lewis tells about his youth and traditional Cherokee stories, including one about a young woman seeking a husband and one about the time the creator asked all the animals to stay awake for several days. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 1, 2017 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Andean Storytelling with Julia Garcia (Quechua)

National Museum of the American Indian
Watch the story of Quwiwan Atujwan, The Andean Fox and the Guinea Pig, unfold in this bilingual family-friendly program. Hear the Quechua language, interact with the characters in the story, and learn a traditional Andean dance! Julia Garcia was born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, where Quechua was her first language. She grew up in a culture where the education of a child is the responsibility of everyone and the transmission of values, customs, rights, and rituals was the work of the entire community. She has devoted herself to teaching the richness of the Quechua language through radio programs, dance, song, and theatre. Ms. Garcia is the director of the Arlington-based Sociedad Cultural Tradiciones Bolivianas, an organization dedicated to the preservation and presentation of the folkloric dances of Bolivia. She is also a certified Spanish teacher at Thomas Jefferson Middle School in Arlington.

Family Storytelling with Grayhawk Perkins (Choctaw/Houma)

National Museum of the American Indian
New Orleans-born Grayhawk Perkins is a well-known cultural figure in Louisiana. He works as an educator, historian, and a musician, teaching music, history, writing, and environmental studies to students from Pre-K to college level. He has been a solo performer for young audiences for more than 15 years. In this family-friendly performance, he tells traditional stories from the Choctaw and Houma of Louisianna, as well as stories from his life growing up in the region. This performance was webcast on September 21, 2013 from the imagiNATIONS Activity Center in the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC.
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