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Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Explore a "day in the life" of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the nation's first collection of American art and home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Located in the heart of the Washington DC, the museum offers an array of programs, tours, concerts, and special exhibitions inspired by the dynamic character and imagination of America's people and artists. AmericanArt.si.edu @americanart 8th and G Streets, NW Washington, DC Produced by: Smithsonian American Art Museum Betsy Broun The Margaret and Terry Stent Director Smithsonian American Art Museum Video Production: Zack Frank, Carlos Parada and Becky Harlan Music by: Dexter Britain http://dexterbritain.co.uk/ All Rights Reserved. © 2013

Watch This! - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Watch This! Revelations in Media Art presents pioneering and contemporary artworks that trace the evolution of a continuously emerging medium. The exhibition celebrates artists who are engaged in a creative revolution—one shaped as much by developments in science and technology as by style or medium—and explores the pervasive interdependence between technology and contemporary culture. The exhibition includes 44 objects from 1941 to 2013, which were acquired by the museum as part of its longstanding commitment to collecting and exhibiting media art. On view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC from April 24, 2015 – September 7, 2015. http://americanart.si.edu/watchthis

Lighting Techniques in the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Time-lapse video showing lighting techniques used to light the gilded age galleries on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. By turning on lights one at a time, this video demonstrates how track lighting fixtures reveal the museum's art and architecture. The video shows how the lighting is built in layers: the first layer is a series of floodlights illumining the walls; next is a series of spotlights revealing the special qualities inherent in each artwork. The video concludes with a demonstration of how a series of lights are used in combination to illuminate a monumental sculpture with multiple narrow beam spotlights. The lighting equipment used in this gallery were: PAR30 halogen floodlights and PAR36 incandescent narrow beam spotlights. The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a leader in transitioning from these incandescent technologies to LED lighting. For more information on LEDs and exhibit lighting please see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1VQwYzbwXU

“Chiura Obata: American Modern” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Chiura Obata ranks among the most significant California-based artists and Japanese American cultural leaders of the last century. Born in Okayama, Japan, Obata immigrated to San Francisco as a teenager in 1903. By then, he was integrating Western practices into his art-making, and continued experimenting with new styles and methods throughout his seven-decade career. As a professor at University of California, Berkeley, and a founder of the East West Art Society, a Bay Area artists’ collective, he facilitated cross-cultural dialogue, despite widespread prejudice against Asian Americans. In 1942, when World War II fears and Executive Order 9066 forced Obata and more than one hundred thousand West Coast Japanese Americans into incarceration camps scattered across the western United States, he created art schools in the camps to help fellow prisoners cope with their displacement and loss. After the war, Obata returned to his callings as a painter, teacher, and cultural ambassador with scars that brought new emotional force to his work.

Meet the Artist: Joyce Scott - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Jewelry artist Joyce Scott discusses her craft in this 2004 video from from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery.

Eldredge Prize Lecture with Amy Lyford | Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Join Occidental College Professor Amy Lyford, winner of SAAM's 2015 Charles C. Eldredge Prize, as she discusses "Isamu Noguchi, Asian America, and Artistic Identity in Postwar New York." Funding for the Charles C. Eldredge Prize is provided by the American Art Forum.

An Evening with Richard Estes - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In conjunction with the exhibition Richard Estes’ Realism, join co-curator and scholar Patterson Sims for a presentation about the life and work of Richard Estes, followed by a conversation and question-and-answer session with the artist.

Eldredge Prize Lecture with Michael Lobel | Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Join Hunter College professor Michael Lobel, winner of SAAM’s 2016 Charles C. Eldredge Prize, for a lecture titled “What John Sloan Can Teach Us about Illustration and American Art.” Support for the Charles C. Eldredge prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art is provided by the American Art Forum.

"Exploring James Castle" Panel Discussion - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In conjunction with the exhibition "Untitled: The Art of James Castle," exhibition curator Nicholas Bell moderates a discussion with Lynne Cooke, senior curator, National Gallery of Art; Jacqueline Crist, managing partner, James Castle Collection and Archive; Frank Del Deo, managing partner, James Castle Collection and Archive and, member, Del Deo & Barzune LLC Art Advisory; and Leslie Umberger, curator of folk and self-taught art, as they explore Castle’s remarkable artistic vision.

"Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth.

"Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth.

Stephanie Stebich is new Smithsonian American Art Museum director

Smithsonian Insider

Stephanie Stebich, executive director of the Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, Wash., since 2005, has been named The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the […]

The post Stephanie Stebich is new Smithsonian American Art Museum director appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

The Singing and the Silence: Birds in Contemporary Art - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"The Singing and the Silence: Birds in Contemporary Art" examines mankind’s relationship to birds and the natural world through the eyes of twelve major contemporary American artists, including David Beck, Rachel Berwick, Lorna Bieber, Barbara Bosworth, Joann Brennan, Petah Coyne, Walton Ford, Paula McCartney, James Prosek, Laurel Roth Hope, Fred Tomaselli, and Tom Uttech. http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2014/birds/

"Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) is regarded today as one of the most important American artists of the twentieth century. A black man born into slavery in Alabama, he was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. Traylor would not live to see the civil rights movement, but he was among those who laid its foundation. Starting around 1939—by then in his late eighties and living on the streets of Montgomery—Traylor made the radical steps of taking up pencil and paintbrush and attesting to his existence and point of view. The paintings and drawings he made are visually striking and politically assertive; they include simple yet powerful distillations of tales and memories as well as spare, vibrantly colored abstractions. When Traylor died in 1949, he left behind more than one thousand works of art.

JRA Distinguished Artist Talk with Richard Jolley and Tommie Rush - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Husband-and-wife artists Richard Jolley and Tommie Rush create intensely colored glass pieces. Jolley, globally known for figurative sculpture, and Rush, known for vessels, discuss their partnership in work and life.

“Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past Is Prologue” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Artist Tiffany Chung probes the legacies of the Vietnam War and its aftermath through maps, videos, and paintings that highlight the voices and stories of former Vietnamese refugees.

"Do Ho Suh: Almost Home" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Do Ho Suh’s immersive architectural installations—unexpectedly crafted with ethereal fabric—are spaces that are at once deeply familiar and profoundly alien. Suh is internationally renowned for his “fabric architecture” sculptures that explore the global nature of contemporary identity as well as memory, migration, and our ideas of home. The exhibition "Do Ho Suh: Almost Home" is organized by Sarah Newman, the James Dicke Curator of Contemporary Art. It is the latest in a series of projects at the Smithsonian American Art Museum that situates the art of the United States in a global context. Learn more at https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/suh

“Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975” at Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975" examines the contemporary impact of the Vietnam War on American art and brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists of the period. Listen to Melissa Ho, curator of 20th century art, talk about "Artists Respond" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Eric Fischl - Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture Series, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Eric Fischl is an internationally acclaimed American painter and sculptor and is considered one of the most important figurative artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Fischl’s paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints have been the subject of numerous solo and major group exhibitions and his work is represented in many museums, as well as prestigious private and corporate collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modem Art in New York City, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, St. Louis Art Museum, Louisiana Museum of Art in Denmark, Musée Beaubourg in Paris, The Paine Weber Collection, and many others. Eric Fischl is a Fellow at both the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He lives and works in Sag Harbor, NY with his wife, the painter April Gornik.

Jerry Saltz - Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture Series - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Since 2007, Jerry Saltz has been the Senior Art Critic for New York Magazine. Before that, starting in 1998, he was Senior Art Critic for the Village Voice. He is a two-time Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Criticism and has had two volumes of criticism published. The 2007 winner of the Frank Jewett Mather Award in Art Criticism from the College Art Association, he has lectured widely including at Harvard, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and many others. He has taught at Columbia University, Yale, RISD, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, among many others. In addition to having written for Frieze, Parkett, Art in America, and many other publications, he was recently ranked #57 “Most Powerful Person in the Art World” by ArtReview Magazine—one ahead of Jasper Johns. This talk is part of the American Art Museum’s annual speaker series, the Clarice Smith Distinguished Lectures in American Art.
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