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Found 2,195 Resources

Portable Shelter

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Shelter

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Shelter

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Shelter

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Family Fallout Shelter

National Museum of American History
The family fallout shelter represents the public policy assumptions of the atomic age, namely, that with enough preparation, the American family and with it the nation's social and political fabric would survive a nuclear attack. This free-standing, double-hulled steel shelter was installed beneath the front yard of Mr. and Mrs. Murland E. Anderson of Ft. Wayne, Indiana. The Andersons purchased their shelter from J. L. Haverstock, a Ft. Wayne realtor who began selling family fallout shelters as a sideline in early 1955 after reading a promotional Life magazine article. The Andersons maintained the shelter from its installation in 1955 through the 1960s, a period spanning the development of the hydrogen bomb and the Cuban missile crisis. Insufficiently anchored against Ft. Wayne's high water table when first installed, the shelter popped to the surface of the Anderson front yard in time for the Cuban missile crisis and was quickly reinterred in a frenzy of shelter building activity in 1961. The donors purchased the property, including the shelter, from the Andersons in 1968.

Shelter Structure

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Building Shelter

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Shelter 2

National Museum of American History

Shelter 2

National Museum of American History

Rain-Proof Shelter "Biroe Kadjang"

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fallout Shelter Medicine Kit A

National Museum of American History

Elephant Back Shelter

National Museum of American History

Shelter in Rambucourt

National Museum of American History
Graphite and colored pencil sketch on paper. American soldiers shelter in a shell-torn building in Rambucourt, France during World War I.

Shelter 117th Floor

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Brush Shelter n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white gelatin glass negative

Give Me Shelter

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
In this lesson plan, students investigate the meaning and importance of shelter. They gather used materials to construct a shelter of their own invention, one that protects against sun and the elements. In a wrap-up discussion, they compare and contrast the functionality of their designs.

Global Village Shelter

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Scene from "Gimme Shelter"

National Museum of American History
Press Print; SCENE FROM MOVIE "GIMMIE SHELTER'; portraying event when Group of Hell's Angels killed a fan during Rolling Stones concert at Altamont; group gathered in circle; persons in center wearing motorcycle cuts using cue sticks to beat unseen person on ground

Emergency Shelter Project: Empathy Unit

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson in which students design a shelter in response to a natural disaster: a tsunami.

Taking Shelter From Rain

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

In a Mountain Shelter

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Shelter at Nightfall, [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Printed on image:) Copyright 1905 by Taber Prang Art Co. / 4302 Shelter at Nightfall.

(Label on back, stamped and inscribed:) June 29, 1905 / The Library of Congress / Two Copies Received June 29 1905 / Copyright Entry June 28 1905 / Class F XXc. No. 32500 / Copy B / Print Division / Aug 5 1905 / No. 42355.

SAO Mount Whitney Shelter Erected

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Images of the site are located in the Charles Greeley Abbot Papers, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Box 187, Folder 3.

Abbot, Charles G., "A Shelter for Observers on Mount Whitney," Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, No. 1886, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, 1910, pp. 499-506, with plates 65 and 66.

Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution for the year 1909, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1910, pp. 12-13, 30-31, 64-66, and plates 3-5.

Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution for the year 1910, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1911, pp. 16-17, 37-38, 73-76, and 99.

In 1909, using a grant from the Thomas George Hodgkins Fund, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory erected a shelter atop Mount Whitney, California, for astrophysical researchers. Smithsonian Secretary Samuel Pierpont Langley (1834-1906) had been at the site in 1881 and deemed it the best location in the country for meteorological and atmospheric observations. SAO Director Charles Greeley Abbot began observations at the site in 1909 and secured the construction of the stone building. Abbot worked with W. W. Campbell, director of the Lick Observatory, in completing the field station.

SAO Shelter Atop Mount Whitney

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
From Plate 5, Smithsonian Institution Annual Report for the Year 1909, opposite p.66. In 1909, using a grant from the Thomas George Hodgkins Fund, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory erected a shelter atop Mount Whitney, California, for astrophysical researchers. Smithsonian Secretary Samuel Pierpont Langley (1834-1906) had been at the site in 1881 and deemed it the best location in the country for meteorological and atmospheric observations. SAO Director (1906-1918) Charles Greeley Abbot, later 5th Secretary of the Smithsonian from 1928-1944, began observations at the site in 1909 and secured the construction of the stone building. Abbot worked with W. W. Campbell, director of the Lick Observatory, in completing the field station. Lick Observatory is part of the University of California Observatories of the University of California on Mt. Hamilton, CA.

The new Smithsonian Institution Astrophysical Observatory shelter for observers atop Mount Whitney, California, 14,502 above sea level. Several people can be seen beside the shelter and on the rocky outcropping.
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