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Found 2,270 Resources

John Storrs and modern sculpture

Archives of American Art
Pamphlet : 11 p. : ill. ; 26 x 17 cm. Title from page 3.
Includes three b&w illustrations of sculptures by Storrs, captioned: Winged horse, Study in abstract form, and one semi-abstract male figure without caption.
Published by the Sociètè Anonyme, Inc., 19 East 47th Street, N.Y.

Modern Sculpture at the Getty

Smithsonian Magazine

Modern Sculpture with Black Shaft

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Alexander Liberman's sculpture Eve

Archives of American Art
1 transparency : col. ; 10 x 13 cm. Transparency showing the outdoor sculpture Eve (1970) by Liberman.

Modern Head

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Cast Of Modern Pipe Sculptured By Keokuk

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "MODERN PIPE. SCULPTURED BY KEOKUK, CHIEF OF THE SACS AND FOXES."

The Modern Ppirit: Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Archives of American Art
Exhibition Catalog : 11 p. ; 17 x 16 cm.

Cover title in direct order: Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture in "The Modern Spirit"

Modern Crusader

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Modern Consciousness

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Modern Egyptian

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Modern Greek

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Modern Cycle

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Engine parts, a headlight, gas tank, and handle bars are intermingled with a zippered motorcycle jacket sleeve, a rider, women’s legs, and other less identifiable forms in Modern Cycle. Hartigan, then a professor at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, explained her choice of subject: “My male students at the time were obsessed with motorcycles—one even kept his in his studio—and out of sheer self-preservation I bought a poster of Brando on a bike and Peter Fonda, some cycle magazines, pinned them on my painting wall and Modern Cycle was the result. It is, incidentally, one of my favorite paintings.”

Modern Masters: Midcentury Abstraction from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2008

Modern Times

Smithsonian American Art Museum
By the mid-1960s, Fasanella was disheartened by the arrogance and self-centeredness that, to him, defined the counterculture movement. Modern Times proposes a futuristic urban scene in which an impersonal and technological society has displaced one of humanity and unity.

Fasanella completed this work following Pope Paul VI’s 1965 visit to Yankee Stadium. In it he contrasts humanistic subjects such as the papal visit, images of workers, protesters, strikers, and returning soldiers with the detached, intellectual side of society—the worlds of science, technology, and fine arts. Fasanella felt the elitist art world had pigeonholed him as “primitive and stupid.” He ardently believed that art didn’t have to be aloof or conceptual; it was a tool to be wielded like a hammer.

Modern Steel Carving

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Standing Buddha (modern)

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Post-Modern Muse

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Modern Head #1

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Modern Head #3

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Modern Head #2

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Bronze mirror; modern

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Sculpture and mural paintings in the beautiful courts, colonnades and avenues of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition at San Francisco 1915 / text by Jessie Niles Burness

Smithsonian Libraries
"Official publication."

Also available online.

CHMEXRF copy 39088011386760 has bookplate: Donated by the Larry Zim World's Fair Collection.

Elecresource

Modern Painting with Clef

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
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