Skip to Content

Found 9,282 Resources

Religion

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Full-length figure of a young woman, standing, turned toward the right, her head shown almost full face, the eyes looking upward to left. She is before an altar.

Religion

National Museum of American History

religion coll object

National Museum of American History

Religion - 1936

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Religion [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Imprinted on image:) Copyright by A.W. Elson and Co.

(Stamped and inscribed on back:) Library of Congress / Copyright Received Nov. 14/17 / Copyright Entry / Class J XXc. No. 226237 / Copy B Delivered to Prints Division / 45578 / Pearce, C.S. / Religion.

Religion [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Printed on image:) Copley Print Copyright 1899 by Curtis and Cameron.

(Stamped and inscribed on back:) Library of Congress / Copyright Received Feby. 13, 1899 / Copyright Entry Feby. 13, 1899 / Class XXc. No. 12576 / Copy B Delivered to Prints Division / A12782 / Pearce, Charles Sprague / Religion.

Religion [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Stamped and inscribed on back:) Library of Congress / Copyright Received Mar. 20, 1899 / Copyright Entry Mar. 20, 1899 / Class XXc. No. 20768 / Copy B Delivered to Prints Division / A13866 / Pearce, Charles Sprague / Religion.

Religion [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Inscribed on image, lower left:) Copyright 1908 by Curtis and Cameron. (Inscribed on image, lower right:) Copyright 1908 by Edwin Austin Abbey.

(Label on back, stamped and inscribed:) Library of Congress / Copy Received 8/29/1908 / Copyright Entry / Class H XXc. / No. 115206 / Copy B Delivered to Prints Division 43550. (In script:) Abbey, Edwin Austin / Religion.

Alegory of Religion

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The figure of Religion, bearing a cross, accompanied by small angel-like figures of children, rises from an open altar on which a chalice has been placed. Two figures stand, left. A nude woman reclines, right. Figures in background, right.

To Miss Wheaton; Religion

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Religion in Early American Symposium

National Museum of American History
On June 26th, 2017 the National Museum of American History hosted a religion symposium to highlight the new exhibition Religion in Early America. Tim Eriksen, Grammy-nominated shape-note singer, opened the symposium with a performance and interactive experience for the audience. Then our religion curator, Peter Manseau led a discussion with Stephen Prothero and Jenna Weissman Joselit about the importance of objects in studying American religious history. Captions to come!

Folk religion in southwest China

Smithsonian Libraries

Handsome Lake Religion 1889-1890

National Anthropological Archives
Negative microfilm on file.

First day of Handsome Lake Code- information thru W.C.S. from Wallace Chafe 1/59.

Text, handwritten.

Article 18: Freedom of Religion

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Background of candle tip and flame. Image is colored in yellow with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Freedom of Religion". On top left corner is "Article 18" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Religion of Nature Deliniated, The

National Museum of American History

"Plains Indian Religion" Exhibit Case

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested by Saul Riesenberg, Division of Ethnology, Department of Anthropology.

Featured in "Native Peoples of the Americas" exhibition in Hall 9, Museum of Natural History.

Draft of a lecture [?] on Siouan religion

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Old number 4751 (15)(part)

Combined with 36.

typescript and autograph document

Religion of the Omahas and Ponkas 1883 ?

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Old number 4751 (14)

typescript and autograph document

Includes fragmentary Dhegiha text.

Lucinda Williams - "You're Gonna Need Pure Religion"

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
For more information about this album, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetai... and for more information about Smithsonian Folkways , the non-profit record label of the national museum, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/index.aspx This video features Lucinda Williams' "You're Gonna Need Pure Religion" from the 1991 album "Ramblin'" on Smithsonian Folkways. Digital Downloads are available of this album in both MP3 and FLAC format. The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time. ©2008 Smithsonian Institution

North American Indian Ritual and Religion Bibliography

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
List of references on Native American rituals and religions.

Exploring religion in early American history

National Museum of American History

What was the significance of religion in the early history of the United States? In the summer of 2017, we will open a new exhibition titled Religion in Early America. It will feature a blend of important objects, documents, and images that explore religion's role in the formation and early development of the nation. The exhibition will focus on three themes: the diversity of religious traditions in America during this period, the principle of freedom of religion that became a guiding principle in American life, and the growth of religion in the early republic.

These are also some of the themes we will explore in depth during our Religion in Early America Symposium on Friday, March 20, 2015. Register to attend in person or watch live via webcast.

The objects we plan to exhibit will include unique treasures and those of everyday religious practice. They are representative of a different era, but continue to speak to us today. Following are six examples from the Smithsonian's collection that we are considering. The exhibition will also include objects we will borrow from other institutions.

1. This German Bible was presented by President John Quincy Adams to his granddaughter in 1837. It is inscribed with a poem in his hand. Adams was a longtime member of the American Bible Society and served as its vice president.

Bible open to page with a poem

2. The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth Extracted Textually from the Gospels in Greek, Latin, French and English, also known as the Jefferson Bible, was created by Thomas Jefferson around 1820 as an expression of his own broad-minded approach to faith. Working from source books in several languages, Jefferson used a pen knife and glue to craft a condensed version of the New Testament in keeping with the reason-driven spirit of the Enlightenment. "I am of a sect by myself, as far as I know," he wrote in 1819.

Jefferson made no plans to publish this work; it was solely for his own reading and reflection. He knew that his beliefs would offend some religious authorities and be used against him by his political rivals. 
 
The book remained privately held throughout his life. Its existence was only known to a few of his closest circle of friends. The book remained in his family until his great-granddaughter sold the volume to the Smithsonian Institution in 1895. 

Bible with columns of text, open

3. Lucretia Mott was a prominent Quaker, abolitionist, and pioneer of women's rights. She became a Quaker minister in 1821 and led efforts to avoid the use of goods produced through the labor of slaves. In 1848, she organized the Seneca Falls Convention with Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Beige cloak with bonnet

4. This sampler illustrates how creating objects inspired by religion was part of everyday life in the early republic. Stitched in its fabric is the phrase: "Love the Lord and he will be a tender father unto the[e]"

5. Religious ceremonies marked rites of passage for Americans during this era. These included baptism, first communion, marriage, and death. The exhibition will include President George Washington's christening robe, which came to the Smithsonian in 1883.

White robe with red interior turned down in corner

6. Some American Indians used wampum in trade as a form of money, but also in religious ceremonies, and betrothal or marriage agreements. The beads symbolized peace, harmony, and contentment. The exhibition will include wampum from the museum's numismatic collection, as well as other objects related to American Indian religious traditions.

Small white shells on string

David Allison is associate director of the Office of Curatorial Affairs. Peter Manseau is the author of One Nation, Under Gods and guest curator. Our Religion in Early America Symposium on Friday, March 20, 2015, is free and open to the public. Register to attend in person or watch live via webcast.

Author(s): 
David Allison and Peter Manseau
OSayCanYouSee?d=qj6IDK7rITs OSayCanYouSee?d=7Q72WNTAKBA OSayCanYouSee?i=wudqiym-Bwk:Bjh203CCTmI:V_sGLiPBpWU OSayCanYouSee?i=wudqiym-Bwk:Bjh203CCTmI:gIN9vFwOqvQ OSayCanYouSee?d=yIl2AUoC8zA

No Tears in Heaven; Old Time Religion

National Museum of American History
Oak Ridge Quartet. side 1: No Tears in Heaven; side 2: Old Time Religion (Capitol 48023). from the album, Songs from The Grand Ole Opry (Capitol AD 86) 78 rpm
1-24 of 9,282 Resources