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Found 1,118 Resources

The Human Relations Council of Greater New Haven presents In white America

Archives of American Art
1 playbill ; 23 x 16 cm. Playbill features prints by Shahn on verso of cover depicting James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner.
Cover bears an inscription to Shahn by Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg, who wrote an appreciation of Shahn included on page 2 of playbill.

Profile of a Race Riot

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A magazine insert from Impact Magazine with a story by Ed Wheeler about the Tulsa Race Riot. The insert was likely published on the occassion of the fiftieth anniversary of the riot.

Scene from Tulsa Race Riot June 1st 1921

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photographic postcard, titled Scene from Tulsa Race Riot June 1st 1921 depicts a group of men and women standing along the side of the road in front of two cars. The men to the right of the image are armed.

Ruins of the Tulsa Race Riot 6-1-21

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photographic postcard titled, Ruins of the Tulsa Race Riot depicts what is left of the Greenwood district in downtown Tulsa after the fires had been suppressed. This image shows that only foundations and some reminents of furniture and personal belongings are left in the rubble.

Poster reading "Race is not a crime" used at Baltimore protests

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This protest poster is white and has text that reads [Race / is not / a crime]. The text is handwritten in black marker and there is a brown stain on the bottom of the poster just left of center. There are no images or text on the back. This placard was used during the Freddie Gray protests in Baltimore, Maryland.

Digital image of police officers in riot gear

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white digital image depicts police officers in riot gear. The two officers in the foreground are out of focus and have their backs to the camera. They are wearing helmets and bullet proof vests. The officers in the background are wearing helmets and are carrying shields reading [POLICE].

46.26 MB

Digital image of a police officer in riot gear

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white digital image depicts a police officer in riot gear. The officer facing the camera is wearing a bullet-proof vest that reads [POLICE] across the front. He is wearing a helmet and has weaponry around his waist. He is holding a shield that also reads [POLICE]. The other officers, also in riot gear, have their back to the camera.

46.26 MB

Digital image of a young boy engaging with police officers

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white digital image depicts a young boy engaging with two police officers. The boy is wearing a sweater with white stripes across the collar. He is holding a water bottle in his right hand and is handing it to one of the officers. The officer in front of him is wearing a helmet, bullet proof vest, shin guards and gloves and is reaching for the water bottle. The officer standing next to him is holding his helmet in his hands. He is wearing a skull cap, bullet proof vest, and shin guards.

46.26 MB

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a pair of signs on a fence. One says "WHAT IS THE BLACK AGENDA" with a phone number, and the other is advocating for jobs.

The Negro: His Future in America

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A special section of the October 18, 1943 issue of "The New Republic" titled "The Negro: His Future in America."

Colored Soldier

Archives of American Art
Poem : 3 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

National Guard Machine Gun Crew during Tulsa Race Riot 6-1-21

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photographic postcard of National Guardsmen with a machine gun mounted on the back of a flat-bed truck on the streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Several soldiers are on the back of the truck with the weapon, one standing and one kneeling to the left of the gun and one at gun sight. Several other soldiers march next to the truck, backs to the camera. Other vehicles and soldiers are visible on the street in the background of the image. Written in white at the bottom of the image is [NATIONAL GUARD / MACHINE GUN CREW / DURING TULSA RACE RIOT 6-1-21].

The postcard is unused. The back of the postcard features [POST CARD] at the top in outlined lettering, an AZO stamp mark with triangles at the four corners, and a divided back with a spot for [CORRESPONDENCE] on the left and [ADDRESS] on the right. There are no inscriptions, front or back.

The Bottom Rail. Addresses and Papers on the Negro in the Lowlands of Mississippi and on Inter-Racial Relationships in the South During Twenty-Five Years [book]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Displayed in Archives Center exhibition, "Women and Jazz: The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, 1937-1949", from March 25, 2011 through May 31, 2011. Craig Orr, curator.

Laurence C. Jones, Founder and Principal of Piney Woods Country Life School, Piney Woods, Miss. A portrait of Mr. Jones is on the left with the inscription, "In the joy of spraying a human orchard, Laurence C. Jones".

Memorial poster for Martin Luther King, Jr.

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This screen print, printing ink on paper, poster memorializes Martin Luther King, Jr. [MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. 1929 1968 / HE DIED TO MAKE MEN FREE] is printed over red and white stripes, resembling the American flag, in the middle, right of the poster. A dark blue image of King, in the upper left of the poster, has an excerpt of King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963 on top of it. The text reads: [The question is not whether we will be extremist~ but what kind of extremist we will be~ / Will we be extremists for hate, or will we be extremists for LOVE? Will we be extremists for the preservation of injustice, or ~ will we be extremists for the cause of justice?]. The bottom of the poster has a portion of King’s I Have a Dream speech [I HAVE A DREAM / THAT MY FOUR CHILDREN WILL ONE DAY LIVE IN A NATION WHERE THEY WILL NOT BE JUDGED BY THE COLOR OF THEIR SKIN BUT BY THE CONTENT OF THEIR CHARACTERS / LITTLE BLACK BOYS & LITTLE BLACK GIRLS WILL BE ABLE TO HOLD HANDS WITH LITTLE WHITE BOYS & LITTLE WHITE GIRLS AS BROTHERS & SISTERS]. Below the text is a drawing of children holding hands. The lower right corner has [Edie Brown Eisenberg 1968 ©].

No Inclusion Here

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an all-white Boy Scout parade. A white man in a hat shoos black youths out of the way.

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an protester with a large sign on his back. It says, “My name is Ulysses. I am asking the people of the people’s republic of China, to prepare a place for the children of my people…I am asking the government of the United States to let these children go… The white people are trying to destroy the black people through starvation and the birth control system…” To the left a man dressed as Abraham Lincoln walks by. The photograph is attached to a thick mounting board. The board is stamped and inscribed on the back.

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an protester with a large sign on his back. It says, “My name is Ulysses. I am asking the people of the people’s republic of China, to prepare a place for the children of my people…I am asking the government of the United States to let these children go… The white people are trying to destroy the black people through starvation and the birth control system…” To the left a man dressed as Abraham Lincoln walks by. The photograph is attached to a thick mounting board. The board is stamped on the back.

Black Studies: Threat or Challenge?

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A book by Nick Aaron Ford titled "Black Studies: Threat or Challenge?" published in Port Washington, New York by the National University Publications Kennikat Press in 1973. The book is signed by the author and dated [To Syl Shannon Sincerely Nick Aaron Ford 3/19/1975]. The book cover features a large red question mark with text on top of it, over a white background. Black text in the bottom portion of the cover reads: [Nick Aaron Ford / Black Studies / Threat or Challenge? / An Eminent Educator's Analysis and Recommendations]. The book has 217 pages and contains information and an analysis of Black Studies as a field of education. The back cover features a photograph and brief biography of Ford, as well as, publishing information.

Photographic print of an unidentified couple

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of an integrated couple seated on a bench. The unidentified woman sits to the right of the man with her legs crossed and turned towards him; the unidentified man rests his proper left hand on her proper left knee. The woman wears a veiled hat and printed knee-length skirt. The man wears a three piece pinstripe suit and a tie with a large floral print. He looks off to the right of the frame while the woman looks directly into the camera. Below the image in the bottom right corner of the print is handwritten text in blue ink which reads [037]. The back of the photograph is blank.

I Spy #1

National Museum of African American History and Culture
I Spy No. 1 printed by Gold Key Comics. The front cover has a color image of Alexander Scott (Bill Cosby) and Kelly Robinson (Robert Culp), the main characters in the television show I Spy. Both men are in gray suits with ties and holding hand guns in their right hands. They are standing in profile with their left sides facing the viewer. They are looking up and to the left and have their guns raised. The top left corner has the logo for Gold Key Comics and “10182-608” in white text. Written at the top in orange and red block text is “I Spy.” A green box with black text in the bottom right corner reads “Scotty and Kelly slug / it out with enemy / agents to recapture an / American defector!” Underneath this in white text is“(c) 1966, THREE F PRODUCTIONS.” The inside front and back cover have black-and-white depictions from the television show with accompanying text. The comic books has sixteen colored pages and the main story is titled The Stolen Secret.

Digital image of protesters cleaning the streets of Baltimore

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white digital image depicts people cleaning a street. In the foreground, a man and two children sweep up debris from the street and sidewalk several feet away from an intersection. The man is wearing a sports jersey and baseball cap. The name on the jersey is partially obscured. The visible part of the jersey reads [HEATHAM / 24]. The child standing in the street is sweeping debris into a dust pan. The child on the sidewalk is also sweeping. More people are cleaning the streets and sidewalks in the background.

46.26 MB

Digital image of a Jaden Powell holding a placard

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white digital image depicts a young Jaden Powell holding a placard. Powell is standing among other protesters and is not looking at the camera. He is holding a large poster in front of his chest that features photographs and hashtags of male and female victims of police brutality. The poster also features hashtags of the names of victims and hashtags of cities and states in which the shootings took place.

46.26 MB
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