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Braising Questions

Smithsonian Magazine

Any Questions?

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Questions About Apollo

Smithsonian Magazine

Questions (Series 7)

National Anthropological Archives
No data is included.

Well Formed Questions.../

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Two Great Questions

National Portrait Gallery

Sloth hair: unanswered questions

Smithsonian Libraries

Basic Questions in Palaeontology

Smithsonian Libraries

Three Questions On Death

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster for Eunme Ahn’s performance, Three Questions On Death at the Gwangju: Ha Jung-Woong Art Hall, Gwangju National University of Education, 2014, part of the Asian Arts Theatre’s Community Performativity 2014 program. Purple text in English and Hangul is outlined in white against turquoise and coral clouds against a purple background. The English reads "Eunme Ahn" and "Three / Questions / on Death."

Seven Questions for Turkey Day

Smithsonian Magazine

4 Questions 4: Kevin Palmer

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Kevin Palmer, founding partner of Kin Design, recently stopped by Cooper-Hewitt for a chat. Seated in the beautiful North Reading Room of the National Design Library, we asked him four questions about starting his business, designing for the museum context, and a new definition of craftsmanship for digital designs.

Five Questions: Women in Jazz

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailLeigh Pilzer is one of the best and busiest saxophonists in the DC area. She will be part of the Washington Women in Jazz Festival Quintet performing on the Take 5! stage this Thursday, March 20th from 5-8 p.m. in the Kogod Courtyard. This month's concert celebrates Women's History Month with a tribute to Melba Liston.

4 Questions 4: Anab Jain

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Anab Jain, founding partner of Superflux, discusses the influence of fantastical beliefs on her work, the structure of her business, and the designer's shifting role in 21st century "architectures of collaboration."

Five Questions with Thomas Lovejoy

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailIn conjunction with the exhibition Alexis Rockman: A Fable for Tomorrow, the American Art Museum presents the Art and Science lecture series that places the science of climate change within a cultural context. Alexis Rockman kicked off the series.

4 Questions 4: Matt Webb

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A quick interview with Matt Webb, CEO & Principal at BERG, a London Design Consultancy. BERG might be best-known for its new product, "Little Printer," a compact and charming device that has garnered plenty of buzz in recent months in the tech & design world. In this interview, Matt talks about his life path, the tricky question of defining design, and the future of personal computing.

Questions & Answers about Little Smokey

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Questions & Answers about Little Smokey prepared by the U.S. Forest Service. The document answers biographical questions about Little Smokey such as where he is from, what his role will be, and his relationship to the original Smokey Bear.

Seven Questions for Turkey Day

Smithsonian Magazine

In preparation for tomorrow’s big day, I offer you a selection of articles on the theme of turkey science:

How did the turkey in my oven get so big?

Should I have bought a Heritage bird (and what is a Heritage bird anyway)?

How do white meat and dark meat differ? Should I worry that turkeys are given antibiotics? Should I worry about hormones and steroids in my turkey?

Will the turkey make me sleepy?

And from my neighbor over at Food and Think, Smithsonian’s new food blog: Do we need to be concerned about how turkeys are treated at the farm?

At FaT you’ll also find an entire history (or eat-ymology) of the turkey. Already read up on your turkey facts? Try the turkey quiz.

A Few Really Pertinent Questions

National Museum of American History

Creative Questions: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine for generating and transforming questions from Project Zero. This routine encourages students to create interesting questions and then imaginatively transform them to explore their creative possibilities. It provides students with an opportunity to practice developing good questions that provide thinking and inquiry into a topic. Uses questions starts such as, "What would it be like if...", "Suppose that...", "What would change if..."

CREATIVE QUESTIONS

A routine for generating and transforming questions

1. Pick an everyday object or topic and brainstorm a list of questions about it.

2. Look over the list and transform some of the questions into questions that challenge the imagination. Do this by transforming questions along the lines of:

What would it be like if...

How would it be different if...

Suppose that...

What would change if...

How would it look differently if ...

3. Choose a question to imaginatively explore. Explore it by imaginatively playing out its possibilities. Do this by: Writing a story or essay, drawing a picture, creating a play or dialogue, inventing a scenario, conducting an imaginary interview, conducting a thought experiment.

4. Reflect: What new ideas do you have about the topic, concept or object that you didn't have before?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

Formulating and exploring an interesting question is often as important as finding a solution. This routine encourages students to create interesting questions and then imaginatively mess around with them for a while in order to explore their creative possibilities. It provides students with the opportunity to practice developing good questions that provoke thinking and inquiry into a topic.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use Creative Questions to expand and deepen students' thinking, to encourage students' curiosity and increase their motivation to inquire. This routine can be used when you are introducing a new topic to help students get a sense of the breadth of a topic. It can be used when you're in the middle of studying a topic as a way of enlivening students' curiosity. And it can be used when you are near the end of studying a topic, as a way of showing students how the knowledge they have gained about the topic helps them to ask ever more interesting questions. This routine can also be used continuously throughout a topic, to help the class keep a visible, evolving list of questions about the topic that can be added to at anytime.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using the routine?

Before using Creative Questions you might want to ask students what they think makes a good question. Then, when you show the Creative Questions, explain that this routine is a tool for asking good questions. Start the routine by providing a topic, concept or object-- Sudan, medieval punishment, a stethoscope, genetic engineering. Ask them to use the Creative Questions to generate a list of questions about the topic or object. Initially, it's best to work together as an entire group. Once students get the hang of the routine, you can have them work in small groups, or even solo.

After students finish generating questions, ask them to pick one of the questions to investigate further. Encourage students to explore it by imaginatively playing out its possibilities. Writing a story or essay, drawing a picture, creating a play or dialogue, inventing a scenario, conducting an imaginary interview, or conducting a thought experiment are just some of the possible ways for students to find out about their questions. At the end of the exploration process be sure to take time to reflect on new insights and ideas about the topic, object or concept.

Question Mark

NMNH - Education & Outreach
This object is part of the Education and Outreach collection, some of which are in the Q?rius science education center and available to see.

Six questions with Dr. David Carr

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
On February 26th, the Smithsonian Libraries will host a free lecture with Dr. David Carr, “Questions for an Open Cultural Institution: Thinking Together in Provocative Places”.  To get to know Dr. Carr a bit better, we asked him a few questions and his insightful answers are below. We hope that you enjoy learning more about more »

Take 5! Five Questions: with Sandy Asirvatham

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Luce Unplugged: Five Questions with DTMD

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Five Questions with the Silent Orchestra

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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