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Ethnology; physical anthropology; linguistics

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Department of Physical Anthropology, 1911

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are several photos of office spaces and Museum cases in this location.

Exhibit cases of the Department of Physical Anthropology in the National Museum of Natural History, 1911. The exhibit cases contain skulls and bones, on top of the exhibit cases sit busts of Native Americans.

Department of Physical Anthropology Storage, 1911

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are several photos of office spaces and Museum cases in this location.

Storage cases in the Department of Physical Anthropology in the National Museum of Natural History on January 15, 1911. Several drawers are opened showing skulls and other bones.

Measuring Human Skulls in Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943), curator of physical anthropology at the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, measures human skulls.

Mending Human Skulls in Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
William H. Short, a staff member of the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History, mends skulls.

United States National Museum, Physical Anthropology Corridor

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 24049

Department of Anthropology: Archaeology, Ethnology, and Physical Anthropology Collections

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Homepage for the archaeology, ethnology, and physical anthropology collections of the Department of Anthropology. Searchable online database includes 97 percent of the cataloged specimens that are currently in the Ethnology and Archaeology collections. New records are added as specimens are cataloged. Includes information on how to order photographs of items in the collection.

Determining the Capacity of Human Skulls in Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
T. Dale (Thomas Dale) Stewart (1901-1997), physical anthropologist in the Department of Anthropology at the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, determines the capacity of human skulls.

Unveiling of Mural by Alton Tobey in Hall of Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 59654.

Digital contact sheet available.

Frame selection featured in "The Torch," March 1966.

Unveiling of mural by Alton Tobey in Hall of Physical Anthropology at the Museum of Natural History, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, with Dr. T. Dale Stewart, Senior Anthropologist, artist Alton Tobey, and wife, Roslyn Tobey. The mural features an Inca surgeon performing a procedure on the skull of a living patient.

Unveiling of Mural by Alton Tobey in Hall of Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 59654.

Digital contact sheet available.

Unveiling of mural by Alton Tobey in Hall of Physical Anthropology at the Museum of Natural History, now known as the National Museum of Natural History. The mural features an Inca surgeon performing a procedure on the skull of a living patient.

Opening of Hall of Physical Anthropology at Museum of Natural History

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 65767.

Digital contact sheet available.

Opening of Hall of Physical Anthropology at Museum of Natural History, now known as National Museum of Natural History, with T. Dale Stewart, Senior Anthropologist; James C. Bradley, Assistant Secretary; and Leonard Carmichael, seventh Smithsonian Secretary.

Dr. Clayton E. Ray Inspecting Walrus Skull; Mural in Hall of Physical Anthropology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 61226.

Digital contact sheet available. Frame selection featured in "The Torch," January 1967.

Dr. Clayton E. Ray, Associate Curator of the Division of Paleontology at the Museum of Natural History, inspecting walrus skull; "Cultural Mutilations in the Pursuit of Beauty" mural by Alton Tobey in the Hall of Physical Anthropology at the Museum of Natural History.

Opening of Hall of Physical Anthropology at Museum of Natural History

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 65767.

Digital contact sheet available.

Opening of Hall of Physical Anthropology at Museum of Natural History, now known as National Museum of Natural History, with T. Dale Stewart, Senior Anthropologist, and James C. Bradley, Assistant Secretary.

Knowledge from the margins: W. Montague Cobb's pioneering research in biocultural anthropology

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Cobb was a colleague of T. Dale Stewart in the Division of Physical Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History. Stewart discusses his work with Cobb in his oral history interviews in Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9521.

See http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/race/AnthroNotesSpring2011web.pdf for an image of Cobb's calipers.

Image title: American Association of Physical Anthropologists 25th Annual Meeting May 12-14, 1960. The man in the center of the line is William Montague Cobb, to his right is T. Dale Stewart. Located in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Scurlock Collections, Box 618.04.109.

W. Montague Cobb became the first African American to receive a doctorate in physical anthropology in the United States in 1932. He was also among the first U.S. physical anthropologists to demonstrate a commitment to biocultural integration and racial equality in his research. Nonetheless, very few European American physical anthropologists responded to or utilized Cobb's work. This continued after bioanthropology took on a more biocultural focus in the 1980s, some 50 years after Cobb's first studies of this kind. This essay addresses Cobb's research and writing from the first decades of his career to illustrate his contribution to developing biocultural perspectives in physical anthropology. The goal of this article is to move Cobb from the margins to the center of discussions about methodological and theoretical developments in bioanthropology over the past 30 years

Joseph Brown in Anthropology Laboratory

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, November 1982

Museum Specialist Joseph Brown in the National Museum of Natural History Anthropology Processing Laboratory sitting behind a table full of skulls, October 1, 1982.

To know the brethren: a biocultural analysis of the W. Montague Cobb skeletal collection

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Cobb was a colleague of T. Dale Stewart in the Division of Physical Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History. Stewart discusses his work with Cobb in his oral history interviews in Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9521.

See http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/race/AnthroNotesSpring2011web.pdf for an image of Cobb's calipers.

Image title: American Association of Physical Anthropologists 25th Annual Meeting May 12-14, 1960. The man in the center of the line is William Montague Cobb, to his right is T. Dale Stewart. Located in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Scurlock Collections, Box 618.04.109.

Date of dissertation is 2003 or 2004 in different sources.

W. Montague Cobb became the first African American to receive a doctorate in physical anthropology in the United States in 1932. He was also among the first U.S. physical anthropologists to demonstrate a commitment to biocultural integration and racial equality in his research. Nonetheless, very few European American physical anthropologists responded to or utilized Cobb's work. This continued after bioanthropology took on a more biocultural focus in the 1980s, some 50 years after Cobb's first studies of this kind. This dissertation addresses Cobb's research and writing from the first decades of his career to illustrate his contribution to developing biocultural perspectives in physical anthropology. The goal of this dissertation is to move Cobb from the margins to the center of discussions about methodological and theoretical developments in bioanthropology over the past 30 years

Bone Biology Lab, NMNH

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Selections available as image set.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by Department of Physical Anthropology.

Bone Biology Lab, NMNH

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by Department of Physical Anthropology.

Leonard Halford Dudley Buxton (1890-1939)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Leonard Halford Dudley Buxton (1890-1939) taught physical anthropology at Oxford University.

Anthropometric measurements of Eskimos collected by Truman Michelson, undated

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Physical anthropology" 3/12/2014.

Anthropometric measurements of Eskimos recorded by Truman Michelson in Labrador and Nain in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume VIII, Cuba with Powell; Jamaica with Langley; Mexico with Gilbert and Dutton; California with McGee; physical anthropology, Hrdlicka, current work 1900

Smithsonian Libraries
Devised title.

Binder's title: Random records.

Typewritten manuscript.

Also available online.

Related materials can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives RU007084, William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931.

William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, and geologist, who spent much of his career affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. He studied art under Theodore Kauffman, and went on to work as a scientific illustrator with Smithsonian staff. In 1872, he was appointed artist-topographer to the United States survey of the territories under Ferdinand V. Hayden, and in 1874 was appointed assistant geologist. He went on to work with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), until returning to the Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum (USNM). Holmes eventually became head curator of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology and Director of the National Gallery of Art.

AAPGRB copy also available on microfilm: MFM 1200 AAPGMAIN.

Elecresource

This is the eighth of sixteen volumes that document the life and work of William Henry Holmes, compiled during 1931 or 1932. Holmes combined text and supporting documents including original drawings, watercolors, photographs, correspondence, official documents, news clippings, and memorabilia. The volume covers 1897 to 1902, and is divided into five sections. The first section describes work in Cuba and Jamaica in 1900 with Smithsonian Institution Secretary Samuel P. Langley and J. W. Powell, Director of the Geological Survey and of the Bureau of American Ethnology. Langley was recording field observations of a buzzard, locally known as the John Crow, for the purposes of his work on "flying machines". Holmes includes notes and measurements relating to this work. He references photographs of the birds, not included in the volume. Section two covers his trip to study ethnology and anthropology in California with W. J. McGee in 1898. Section three describes a visit to Mexico with Major Clarence E. Dutton and G. K. Gilbert in 1899 to make geological and archaeological observations. Section four covers the organization of the Division of Physical Anthropology. Section five covers Holmes' archaeological work.

Earnest Albert Hooton (1887-1954)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Earnest Albert Hooton (1887-1954), Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University, and Curator of Somatology at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.
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