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Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Laying out the Nation's Capitol - Diorama of Andrew Ellicott Surveying Washington, D.C.

Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Pike Shop Lounge

Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Chemistry Laboratory of about 1790

Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Chemistry Laboratory of about 1790

New Natural & Physical Sciences Subject Guides

Smithsonian Libraries
We have exciting news to share: the Smithsonian Libraries has launched new subject guides to support general research in the natural and physical sciences.  These web guides include Natural History, more »

Physical Science Hall, NMHT

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Record Unit 285, Box 19, Folder 11.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by Office of the Deputy Director.

Physical Science Hall at the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT), now known as the National Museum of American History.

Pike Shop Lounge in Hall of Physical Sciences at National Museum of History and Technology

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as SIA2010-2938.

Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by Office of the Deputy Director, NMHT.

See also Record Unit 285, Box 19, Folder: Permanent Exhibits.

Interior view, facing entrance of Pike Shop.

Hall of Physical Sciences Staff Preview

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Staff preview of the Hall of Physical Sciences at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

Hall of Physical Sciences Staff Preview

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 59847.

Digital contact sheet available.

Staff preview of the Hall of Physical Sciences at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

Physical Science Exhibit, A & I Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Physical Science Exhibit opened in 1959 in the Arts and Industries Building. The exhibit is a recreation of Henry Fitz's workshop, this country's first commercial telescope maker. The exhibit represents the shop of a 19th-century instrument maker. In it may be seen the crude foot-powered lens grinder and polisher, the simple testing apparatus, and a number of telescopes under construction. An animated figure in the background, working patiently at polishing a lens, helps to illustrate the methods by which Yankee ingenuity has contributed to science as well as to the invention of gadgets.

Press Release Photos of Exhibits for Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 59810.

Digital contact sheet available.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 45, Folder 13.

Press release photos of exhibits for Hall of Physical Sciences at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as National Museum of American History.

Press Release Photos of Exhibits for Hall of Physical Sciences

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 59810.

Digital contact sheet available.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 45, Folder 13.

Press release photos of exhibits for Hall of Physical Sciences at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as National Museum of American History.

physics charts

National Museum of American History

CARTE DE LA LOUISIANE ET DU COURS DU MISSISSIPPI Dressee sur un grand nombre de Memoires entrautres sur ceux de Mr le Maire Par Guillaume DeLisle de l’Academie Rle des Sciences

National Museum of American History
In 1718, the same year a French merchant company laid the foundations for the city of New Orleans, Guillame Delisle (or DeLisle) published this map of Louisiana and the course of the Mississippi River. The signature reads “a Paris Chez l’Auteur le Sr Delisle sur le Quay de l’Horloge avec Privilege du Roy Juin 1718.” An inset at lower right shows the mouth of the Mississippi River; the text here reads “CARTE PARTICULIERE DES EMBOUCHURES DE LA RIVIE S. LOUIS ET DE LA MOBILE.” This map extends from 26° to 46° latitude north, and from 271° to 306° longitude west from Paris. It shows numerous Indian settlements as well as routes followed by such explorers as DeSoto, Deni, Cavier, and de Tonty. It helped bolster the French claim to ownership of this part of North America. And it was widely copied. Ref: R. V. Tooley, “French Mapping of the Americas,” Map Collectors Circle 33 (1967).

Making Sense Of Climate Change 1: The History and Physical Science of Global Warming

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Get the truth about climate change, with plant scientist Bert Drake of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. In this 6-part series, discover how we got here, how we move forward, and what climate change could mean for our food our coastlines and our homes. Learn more at https://serc.si.edu/making-sense-of-climate-change. Lecture 1: The History and Physical Science of Global Warming Meet the first discoverers of human-induced climate change, and learn how greenhouse gases can cause temperature changes around the globe. Credits: Opening images courtesy of NASA, Chesapeake Bay Program, USAID and the U.S. Department of Energy Music: "Ruckus 3" by Dave Depper From The Free Music Archive Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ Carbon Dioxide pumphandle video by NOAA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA7tfz3k_9A What's Really Warming the World? by NASA

U. S. COAST SURVEY / A. D. BACHE Superintendent / Sketch C / SHOWING THE PROGRESS OF THE SURVEY / IN / SECTION No. III / From 1843 to 1855

National Museum of American History
This map is centered on the Chesapeake Bay, but contains information on the Atlantic Coast, the Rappahannock River, Richmond, and the District of Columbia. It extends from about 36°35' to 39°40' latitude, and from below 75° to above 77°20' longitude west of Greenwich. The scale is 1/400,000. The date is 1855.

Water Color Sketch of Surveying Party

National Museum of American History
George E. Gladwin (1829-1920) taught drawing at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute for almost thirty years, and spent his free time making drawings, paintings and sketches. This charming image depicts four men along a rural sea shore. One holds a vertical rod, one looks through a telescopic plane table, and two sit on the ground. These men may be working for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, the organization that transferred this image to the Smithsonian. The signature in lower left reads “Geo. E. Gladwin 1895.”

A New MAP / of VIRGINIA from the best authorities: / by T. Kitchin Geogr

National Museum of American History
Thomas Kitchin (1718-1784) was an English engraver and cartographer, many of whose maps were published in the London Magazine. This one appeared in the issue for November 1761. It extends from lat. 36°10' to 39°55' north, and from 75°40' to 82°25' west of London; and from 0° to 7° west of Philadelphia. The text at top reads “For the Lond: Ma;” It would have been of interest to readers following the course of the French and Indian Wars.
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