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Found 82,105 Resources

Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Pioneer Park

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Pioneer Park letterhead with decorative blue border. Printed in black and brown block letters, at top: PIONEER PARK; in printed black cursive text below: Aspen, Colorado.

Park

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
a; a repetition of 6 photo images of skyscrapers along Park Avenue. in silver on black. b. same pattern in black on white.

Pioneer Park

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Plain Pioneer Park letterhead with blue decorative border. Probably intended for use after the first page.

Smithsonian Park, 1900

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Similar photographs in same folder.

Smithsonian Park, the area is now know as The Mall, in 1900. The park was filled with large trees, meandering pathways, and rolling hills. The beautiful chestnut trees were destroyed by a blight a few years later.

Central Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Estes Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Central Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Central Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

City Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Lincoln Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Greenwich Park

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Bryant Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Yellowstone Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Central Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

City Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Prospect Park Bridge (Prospect Park, Brooklyn)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Rock Creek Park

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Park Scene

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Park City 89. Park City, interior, 28.

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Mungo Park's travels

Smithsonian Libraries
Also available online.

Elecresource

Central Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Neither the cold of winter nor the gloom of the Great Depression kept the children of New York City from enjoying Central Park, the city’s greatest green space. Artist Carl Nelson had almost as much fun as the children, drawing by the hour despite the chill of February 1934. When his hands got cold, Nelson recalled, he "would go to the monkey house in the Central Park Zoo to warm up."

Nelson shows the park on a weekday afternoon when it is full of mothers taking their toddlers out to play while the older children are in school. The brightly colored coats worn by the children and their mothers evoke their innocent delight. The southern end of the park, near the elegant hotels in the background, was designed for children. They could romp on the playground, ride the carousel, or play games in the Children’s Cottage. A little girl in an orange coat has plenty of fun just feeding the squirrels. Nelson’s charming image does not include the grimmer reality farther north in Central Park, where homeless people squatted in a shantytown or "Hooverville" as they waited for better times.1934: A New Deal for Artists exhibition label

City Park

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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