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Paleontology, (Cretaceous)

National Museum of American History

Vertebrate Paleontology Hall, USNM

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See Neg. #s 97-3049 and 2005-2999 for other views of the exhibits. For 1930s view of the hall see 33835-C.

View of the Vertebrate Paleontology Hall, also known as Dinosaur Hall, in the United States National Museum's (USNM) Natural History Building (NHB), now the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). At the time of this picture the exhibit of fossil animals was called the "Hall of Extinct Monsters." Several dinosaur skeletons and other fossil animals are on exhibit. In this picture is the tail of the Sea-Living Mammal skeleton. Skeletons of various types of vertebrates are visible including the skeleton on the right of an Irish elk. A mural of "Diana of the Tides" can be seen on the rear wall.

Bulletins of American paleontology

Smithsonian Libraries
Some issues accompanied by CD-ROM. Latest issue consulted: No. 356 (Mar. 4, 1999). Volume designation dropped with no. 356, Mar. 4, 1999. Also available online. Also issued online; access available via SIL PURL. Vols. for May 1895-1933 published at: Cornell University; 1934- by: Paleontological Research Institution. Issued with: American paleontologist, <1993-> Elecresource

Paleontology Laboratory, USNM

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For a later picture, see Neg. 4886-B

Image reproduced in the 1913 Smithsonian Institution, Unived States National Museum, Bulletin 80, Plate 14.

Smithsonian Institution employees are at work in the Paleontology Laboratory in the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, 1913. On work tables are various fossils. On the rear wall is a fossil of a Plesiosaurus, an aquatic reptile from the end of the Triassic period (220 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous period (65 million years ago).

Paleontology Laboratory, USNM

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For a picture of the Extinct Monsters Hall with the large fossil of a Ray-finned bony fish on exhibit, see Negative # 32017-A. For an earlier picture, see Neg. 2002-21697.

In the foreground of the Paleontology Laboratory in the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, 1926, is a large fossil of a ray-finned bony fish in the matrix on a table. This fossil will be placed on exhibit in "Extinct Monsters Hall" which opened in the 1930s. On another table are the bones of a dinosaur. On the rear wall is a fossil of a Plesiosaurus, an aquatic reptile from the end of the Triassic period (220 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous period (65 million years ago).

Paleontology Exhibit, Petrified Wood

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Petrified wood is on exhibit as part of the Paleontology Exhibit in the National Museum of Natural History, pre-1963.

Vertebrate Paleontology Hall, NHB

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See also image number 2005-2927. For a close-up view of the stegosaurus, image number MNH-28156.

Note on photograph refers to "Gazin," (Charles Lewis Gazin), who in 1932 became a curator in the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology at USNM.

View is of a portion of the Vertebrate Paleontology Hall, or Dinosaur Hall, in the United States National Museum's (USNM) Natural History Building (NHB), now known as the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The exhibit shows dinosaur skeletons and dinosaur models. At the time of this picture the exhibit was called the "Hall of Extinct Monsters." A papier mache reproduction of a Stegosaurus is at the center and a skeleton of a Triceratops is behind it.

Paleontology Exhibit, Hagerman Horses

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Paleontology Exhibit in the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History. The photograph shows an exhibit case containing three Hagerman horse skeletons, labeled Plesippus at the time the image was taken..

American Mastodon, Paleontology Hall

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See Neg. #229471 for similar view with a Museum employee.

The skeleton of an American Mastodon with long tusks stands in the Paleontology Hall of the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History, c. 1917. The American Mastodons occupied woodland areas of North American from coast to coast and from Alaska to central Mexico, but are now extinct. At the time of this picture the exhibit was called the "Hall of Extinct Monsters."

Paleontology Exhibit, Stegosaurus- Armored Dinosaur

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See Neg. #29897 for the same dinosaur with the background.

The skeleton of an armored dinosaur, the Stegosaurus, part of the Paleontology Exhibit in the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), pre-1963. In this picture the background has been taken out.

Cambrian Geology and Paleontology

Smithsonian Libraries

Panama Canal Paleontology Project

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Proyecto de Paleontología del Canal de Panamá

Coopers in Paleontology Lab

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Photograph included in the transcript of G. Arthur Cooper Interview by Pamela M. Henson, January 12, 1984, in Smithsonian Institution Archives. Calendar on wall reads June 1954.

G. Arthur (Gustav Arthur) Cooper (1902-2000) and his wife, Josephine Cooper, are at work in his office in the Division of Invertebrate Paleontology, United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History, in June of 1954. Specimens of fossil brachiopods can be seen on the desk as well as where his wife is working by the window.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 2005-2998 and 2797.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building, featuring large mammal skeletons, including a giant sloth (Megatherium), Hadrosaurus model, and several marine specimens hanging from the ceiling.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building, featuring large mammal skeletons, including a giant sloth (Megatherium), and several marine specimens hanging from the ceiling.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 3693.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Exhibit case with New World monkey skeletons in the Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 3695.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Exhibit case with mammal skeletons in the Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 3694.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Exhibit case with mammal skeletons in the Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building.

Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 3696.

See also Record Unit 95, Box 43, Folder 14.

Exhibit case with mammal skeletons in the Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy exhibit in the southeast range of the United States National Museum, now known as the Arts and Industries Building.

Paleontology Exhibit of a Duck-billed Reptile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
A duck-billed reptile, Edmontosaurus annectens, catalog number USNM V 2414, in the Paleontology Exhibit in the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, c. 1911-1930. The reptile was found in the Lance Formation "Ceratops beds," Upper Cretaceous, Converse County, Wyoming, in 1891.

Vertebrate Paleontology Exhibit, Conference on Future

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See negative number 17883-B for similar image of Charles W. Gilmore and exhibit.

Vertebrate Paleontology Exhibit at the Conference on the Future of the Smithsonian, February 11, 1927, with Charles W. Gilmore, Curator, standing near panels and dinosaur remains.
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