Skip to Content

Found 33,149 Resources

Paleobiology field books

Smithsonian Field Book Project
Harrison G. Dyar's catalogue of lepidoptera collected between August 1885 and 7 August 1913. Information in the catalogue includes the number and name of each specimen, the name of the collector, and the date and location the specimen was collected. Entries are numbered 1 to 39950. Some numbers are accompanied by "=" and another number. Localities in which specimens were collected include New York, New Hampshire, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado, Montana, Oregon, California, British Columbia (Canada), and the Bahamas.

Smithsonian contributions to paleobiology

Smithsonian Libraries
Biological abstracts 0006-3169

Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Unearthed: Exploring Paleobiology Literature with Smithsonian Libraries

Smithsonian Libraries
This blog post is part of a series from Smithsonian Libraries highlighting Unearthed, a new collection of paleobiology literature in Biodiversity Heritage Library curated by Smithsonian Libraries in celebration of more »

Paleobiology Exhibit, National Museum of Natural History

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Echinoderms section of the Fossil Plants and Invertebrates exhibit which opened in the National Museum of Natural History in June of 1961, as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

Paleobiology in the TC: Collections, Labels, and Your Transcription

Smithsonian Institution
Kathy Hollis from the National Museum of Natural History - Department of Paleobiology takes time to tell us more about the collections, arrangements, and kinds of information you'll find in the Marine Invertebrates projects in the Smithsonian Transcription Center. Your help is needed to unlock and better structure important analog data from the labels in their collection. Learn more here: https://transcription.si.edu/instructions-paleobiology

A paleobiologic perspective on plant–insect interactions

Smithsonian Libraries
Fossil plant–insect associations (PIAs) such as herbivory and pollination have become increasingly relevant to paleobiology and biology. Researchers studying fossil PIAs now employ procedures for assuring unbiased representation of field specimens, use of varied analytical quantitative techniques, and address ecological and evolutionarily important issues. For herbivory, the major developments are: Late Silurian–Middle Devonian (ca. 420–385 Maaa The designation, Ma, or mega-annum, refers to millions of years ago. Also see Figure 1. ) origin of herbivory; Late Pennsylvanian (318–299 Ma) expansion of herbivory; Permian (299–252 Ma) herbivore colonization of new habitats; consequences of the end-Permian (252 Ma) global crisis; early Mesozoic (ca. 235–215 Ma) rediversification of plants and herbivores; end-Cretaceous (66.5 Ma) effects on extinction; and biological effects of the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) (55.8 Ma). For pollination, salient issues include: Permian pollination evidence; the plant hosts of mid-Mesozoic (ca. 160–110 Ma) long-proboscid pollinators; and effect of the angiosperm revolution (ca. 125–90 Ma) on earlier pollinator relationships. Multispecies interaction studies, such as contrasting damage types with insect diversity and establishing robust food webs, expand the compass and relevance of past PIAs.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier Holding a Specimen Bottle

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

See Negaives SIA2013-03886, SIA2013-03890, SIA2013-03891, SIA2013-03892 for Fred Collier holding a specimen bottle from a storage drawer filled with specimen bottles.

See Negatives SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for additional photos of Fred Collier.

In the Paleo collection at an open drawer holding specimen bottles, Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, stands holding a specimen bottle in his left hand and using the thumb of his right hand.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier with Collections

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

See Negatives SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for additional photos of Fred Collier.

See Negatives SIA2013-03886, SIA2013-03890, SIA2013-03891, SIA2013-03892 for Fred Collier holding a specimen bottle from a storage drawer filled with specimen bottles.

In the Paleo collection, Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, stands at an open drawer which holds specimen bottles. Other drawers in a bank of storage cabinets are open to exhibit their contents.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

See Negatives SIA2013-03886, SIA2013-03890, SIA2013-03891, SIA2013-03892 for Fred Collier holding a specimen bottle from a storage drawer filled with specimen bottles.

See Negatives SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for additional photos of Fred Collier.

In the Paleo collection at an open drawer holding specimen bottles, Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, stands holding a specimen bottle in his right hand and with the index finger of the left hand.

Fred Collier

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

See Negatives SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for additional photos of Fred Collier.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, holds a fossil, with preserved remains or traces of an animal, plant, or other organism, found in rock formations and sedimentary layers. Other specimens can be seen in an open drawer.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier Amidst Storage Shelving

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

See Negs. SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for photos of Fred Collier.

See Negs. SIA2013-03887, SIA2013-03888, and SIA2013-0389 for photos of Fred Collier holding the core segment.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

In the Paleo collection, Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, stands near the back wall holding a core segment. The room with its open shelving contains objects (core segments) wrapped in plastic. Two air handling units are attached to the ceiling.

Fred (Frederick J.) Collier Holds Core Segment

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Kjell Bloch Sandved of the Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), at the commission of Porter Kier, then Director, NMNH, prepared these photographic materials to document personnel and activities of NMNH in 1975.

The Department of Paleobiology was created in 1963 as part of a reorganization in the National Museum of Natural History. At that time the Department of Geology was divided into two departments, with the Divisions of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany and Vertebrate Paleontology joined to form the Department of Paleobiology, a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms .

See Negatives SIA2013-03883 through SIA2013-03892 for photos of Fred Collier.

See Negatives SIA2013-03887, SIA2013-03888, and SIA2013-0389 for photos of Fred Collier holding the core segment.

In the Paleo collection, Fred (Frederick J.) Collier, Collection Manager in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, stands holding a core segment labeled "LF g(a) April '72." Other objects (core segments) wrapped in plastic are on open shelving with labels on each shelf.
1-24 of 33,149 Resources