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Maureen Yancey Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.14.1a and 2016.129.14.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

92.31944 GB

Maureen Yancey was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Yancey donated her son, J. Dilla's equipment, including a MOOG and MPG that are featured in our Musical Crossroads exhibit, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview Maureen Yancey talks about her son, J Dilla's, life and work and why she decided to donate his equipment to the museum.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Kenneth Royster Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.4.1a and 2016.129.4.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

166.46723 GB

Ken Royster was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Royster donated a collection of his photographs to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

During this oral history interview Ken Royster discusses his evolution as an artist and photographer and his approach to his work. Royster is known for his black and white photography of African American cultural rituals, such as baptisms. He also talks at length about growing up in Baltimore, Maryland.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

DaWayne Brashear Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.12.1a and 2016.129.12.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

144.75604 GB

DaWayne Brashear was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Brashear donated several items related Carl Brashear’s career in the Navy, including his prosthetic leg, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history DaWayne Brashear recounts his memories of growing up with his father, Chief Master Carl Brashear. His narrative includes descriptions of his father’s work as well as insightful details about their family life while their father doggedly pursued a career as a Master Diver in the face of discrimination, and even after he lost his leg.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Amirah Muhammad Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.7.1a and 2016.129.7.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

89.37764 GB

Amirah Muhammad was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Muhammad donated a platinum pendant that was commissioned by Elijah Muhammad for Clara Muhammad to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history Amirah Muhammad, granddaughter of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad and Clara Muhammad, discusses the dynamics of growing up in the Nation of Islam, including memories of Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Robert Houston Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.5.1a and 2016.129.5.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

132.40872 GB

Robert Houston was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Houston donated a collection of his photographs to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this interview, Robert Houston discusses his life and his journey to become a photographer. His story includes references to Gordon Parks and his unconventional methods of getting close enough to take shots of celebrities and entertainers.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Ann Jimerson Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.9.1a and 2016.129.9.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

55.06189 GB

Ann Jimerson was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Jimerson donated shards of glass from the 16th St. Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Her family had kept them as a reminder of their commitment to Civil Rights.

In this oral history interview Ann Jimerson recounts moving from the North to Birmingham, Alabama in the 1960s. She discusses her memories of what it was like to be a white child from up North in a liberal family, during the tumultuous years of the Civil Rights movement in Birmingham.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Russell Williams II Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.13.1a and 2016.129.13.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

228.30216 GB

Russell Williams was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Williams donated a collection of artifacts and photographs representing his pioneering Hollywood career, including both of his Academy Awards, his two Emmy Awards, and audio equipment he used to record dialogue on the set of various films to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history Russell Williams discusses his childhood in Washington, DC and his journey to becoming a successful Hollywood sound engineer. He talks about the challenges that face African Americans in the film industry. He also gives vivid descriptions of what it was like to work on the sets of "Glory" and "Dances with Wolves".

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Charles David Kleymeyer Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.18.1a and 2016.129.18.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

128.98321 GB

Dr. Charles D. Kleymeyer was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Dr. Kleymeyer is a close friend and research partner of Juan Garcia. Juan Garcia Salazar, an Afro-Ecuadorean, donated the very first item to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, a carved stool of clear tropical hardwood etched with a spider web motif, symbolizing West African folklore character, Anansi the Spider. This item is featured in our Cultural Expression Gallery. Dr. Kleymeyer, who lives in the DC Metropolitan area, has often acted as interpreter for Garcia Salazar and was present when the stool was delivered to NMAAHC Director Lonnie Bunch.

In this oral history interview Dr. Charles D. Kleymeyer discusses his life and work at length, including his memories of growing up near the African American community of Lyles Station in Indiana and the extensive work he did for many years with African and Indigenous peoples in Ecuador while working for the Inter-American Foundation (IAF). It was his work with the IAF that brought him into contact with Juan Garcia Salazar and he discusses their relationship in detail.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Cheryl Bailey Solomon Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.10.1a and 2016.129.10.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

53.0292 GB

Cheryl Bailey Solomon was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Solomon donated several Delta Sigma Theta items including bucket hats, pledge pins, a water glass, and a floor mat, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview Cheryl Bailey Solomon talks about why she pledged Delta Sigma Theta while attending the HBCU Coppin State College and what that experience was like.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.2.1a and 2016.129.2.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

80.53677 GB

Joan Mulholland was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Mulholland donated Civil Rights ephemera, such as pamphlets, buttons, and flyers from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) events to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview, Joan Mulholland discusses the items she donated from the Civil Rights Movement that reflect her life of activism, including her involvement in SNCC. She also discusses her choice to attend the HBCU Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi, as a white woman, and the response of her parents to her choices and political activities.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Edward Theodore Taylor Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.6.1a and 2016.129.6.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

152.84613 GB

Edward Taylor was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Taylor donated a photograph of himself that was taken in Korea during the Korean War to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. He was 19 years old at the time the photograph was taken.

Edward Taylor vividly recounts his childhood in the segregated world of Maryland’s eastern shore, including a particularly tragic incident involving racial violence. He continues on to tell the story of his experience as a combat infantryman during the Korean War, after the US military had been recently integrated. This story includes the tale of how he earned two Purple Hearts. Later, after he returns to the United States, he recounts a racial incident that lead him to discard his Purple Hearts in the Chesapeake Bay. The last part of the interview is devoted to his role as a pioneering educator in the desegregation of the public schools in Wicomico County, Maryland.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

John Jacob Oliver Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.19.1a and 2016.129.19.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

169.00092 GB

John Jacob Oliver was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Mr. Oliver worked for the AFRO-American newspaper, which donated a printing press to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview John Jacob Oliver gives a narrative of what it was like to grow-up in the Murphy family, which has published the AFRO-American newspaper since 1892. He discusses his childhood in Baltimore, Maryland, where he personally integrated John E. Howard elementary school in the 6th grade. Oliver talks about his educational journey, which included a short stint at the University of Maryland, before deciding to transfer to the HBCU Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee and his later studies for a law degree from Columbia University. He recounts his work as a lawyer, before returning to the family business at the AFRO-American. His story includes his role in instituting modern technology at the AFRO.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Joyce A. Bailey Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.3.1a and 2016.129.3.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

95.07477 GB

Joyce Bailey was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Bailey donated the entire collection and archives of the Black Fashion Museum after her mother's, Lois K. Alexander Lane, passing to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

During this interview, Joyce Bailey discusses her mother, Lois K. Alexander Lane’s life and work in the fashion industry. In addition to the Black Fashion Museum, Lois K. Alexander Lane also founded the National Association of Milliners, Dressmakers and Tailors, the Harlem Institute of Fashion and two custom wear boutiques (The Needle Nook of Washington, DC and Lois K. Alexander & Co. in New York City).

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Rev. Shari-Ruth Goodwin Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.8.1a and 2016.129.8.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

50.07391 GB

Shari-Ruth Goodwin was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Ms. Goodwinn donated several items related to the 1972 Black National Political Convention to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview, Shari-Ruth Goodwin discusses her mother, Pastor Ruth Goodwin's, participation in the 1972 Black National Political Convention and her memories of her mother’s political activities.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Dr. Juanita Patience Moss Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.17.1a and 2016.129.17.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

63.81855 GB

Dr. Juanita Patience Moss was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. Dr. Moss donated some of her father, C. Edgar Price's equipment and art work to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview Dr. Juanita Patience Moss discusses her father C. Edgar Patience’s life and work at length-including the Anthracite coal industry and how he became an artist in this medium. She also discusses the African American community of West Pittston, Pennsylvania.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

General Colin L. Powell Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.15.1a and 2016.129.15.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

93.98498 GB

General Colin Powell was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. General Powell donated several items including a uniform that is on display to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this interview conducted by National Museum of African American History and Culture Director Lonnie Bunch, General Colin Powell discusses his early life as the son of Jamaican immigrants and the journey to a long and distinguished military career that culminated in being appointed the first African American Secretary of State under President George W. Bush.

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

Clarifying connections: Navajo Oral History

Smithsonian Libraries
One never knows what kind of material will be next, when cataloging for library branches serving Smithsonian’s 19 museums and research centers.  I recently received a box of DVDs that more »

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden Oral History Interview

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The oral history consists of 2016.129.1.1a and 2016.129.1.2a: two versions (unedited, and edited) of a single digital video recording.

101.27344 GB

Major General Charles F. Bolden was interviewed as part of the NMAAHC Donor Oral History Collection. General Bolden donated some of his personal belongings, including uniforms, supplies, and photographs, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In this oral history interview, General Charles Bolden describes his childhood in Columbia, SC, where he grew up in an environment that was educationally and culturally stimulating, despite the strict legal segregation that existed. He discusses his early interest in science and how he became determined to attend the Naval Academy while still a teen. He describes how he overcame many obstacles that were the result of racial discrimination to achieve his dreams and eventually become a Major General, astronaut, and the Administrator of NASA (appointed by President Barack Obama).

Unedited File: Unedited digital file of oral history interview. This file is necessary in case we need to refer to the original recording for any reason and/or want to use a portion of the file that has been edited out.

Edited File: Videographer has minimized or eliminated interruptions, false starts and any unnecessary sounds. An agreed upon slate has also been added with title, date, and logo. Separate files of the same interview have been concatenated. This is the copy that will be made available to the public and/or researchers and uploaded to the website.

#DontMuteDC: An Oral History

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
#DontMuteDC: An Oral HistoryArtwork & Design by Xueying ChangFestival.si.edu Since 1995, go-go music has emanated from speakers outside a telecommunications store in the Shaw neighborhood of D.C. Though in compliance with city ordinances, the owner was forced to turn his music down after a neighbor from a new luxury condo complained to T-Mobile national headquarters. This precipitated the #DontMuteDC uprising which morphed into an urgent public conversation about gentrification, culture, and racial inequality.A Howard University and Smithsonian Folklife Festival team captured voices from the movement on June 6, 2019. The recordings and transcripts will be accessible through the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives.Donald Campbell, owner of Central Communications (Metro PCS), a cell phone and go-go music store located in the Shaw neighborhood, perhaps the most intensely gentrifying community in the United States“I thought that go-go music was actually dying, so I wanted to keep it alive. That’s why I started playing the music here in the store every day. Since 1995. I started playing music from 10 o’clock ’til 7 o’clock.”Julien Broomfield, Howard University class of 2019, created #DontMuteDC hashtag on April 7, 2019 “When you think of ‘mute,’ you automatically think of completely cutting out a sound, and music is a vital sound. But I wanted to think even more, so how black people have been muted pretty much our whole lives.”Tone P, Universal Music recording artist and producer who used his national platform to publicize and make music for the movement“#DontMuteDC is a movement, and a collective of people, who’ve been doing #DontMuteDC things before #DontMuteDC happened. It really just brought people together who was working in different fields to all collectively come and combat a situation, for a thriving business owner being pressured by gentrification.”Tony Lewis, author, activist, re-entry specialist, curated #DontMuteDC and #DCNatives photo shoot and musical performance by BLACK ALLEY BAND on April 13, 2019“It woke up a sleeping giant. It’s become a battle cry. I think it will be etched in history as something that happened, a way to attack injustices done to black people, natives in this city, moving forward.”Ronald “Mo” Moten, cultural and peace activist, co-created Don’t Mute DC Go-Go Music and Culture petition on April 7, 2019 “I’ve used go-go in political campaigns. I’ve used go-go to rally people together. I’ve used go-go to bring about peace and truces with our young people. I use go-go to educate people, and so have others. So go-go was just a vehicle that was created, and it goes back to our roots in Africa—where the conga was always used to educate, and motivate, and institutionalize change.”Ronald “Mo” Moten, cultural and peace activist, co-created Don’t Mute DC Go-Go Music and Culture petition on April 7, 2019 “I’ve used go-go in political campaigns. I’ve used go-go to rally people together. I’ve used go-go to bring about peace and truces with our young people. I use go-go to educate people, and so have others. So go-go was just a vehicle that was created, and it goes back to our roots in Africa—where the conga was always used to educate, and motivate, and institutionalize change.”Natalie Hopkinson, Howard University assistant professor, author, co-created Don’t Mute DC Go-Go Music and Culture petition“Go-go music is flowing like the rivers since this happened. And this makes me happy. #DontMuteDC is one of these little sparks that helps us remember what is possible and how powerful we are as a people.”

Xueying Chang is an intern at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and fine art and documentary photographer, pursuing her master’s degree at George Washington University. She is also a freelance writer, graphic designer, and videographer.

Forrest C. Pogue Receiving Oral History Award from Benis M. Frank

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Photograph included in the transcript of the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Interviews by James C. Tapley, December 19, 1986, in Smithsonian Institution Archives.

In its continuing efforts to recognize and promote high standards in the field of oral history, Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region (OHMAR) created an annual award for outstanding and continuing contributions to oral history. The award, named for Forrest C. Pogue, who pioneered oral history in combat during World War II, and who served as an early president of the Oral History Association, was presented to Forrest C. Pogue (1912-1996), the first recipient of the award, by Benis M. Frank, president of OHMAR. Pogue was director of The Dwight D. Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian.

Oral history interview with Julie Ault, 2017 November 14-16

Archives of American Art
Audio: 6 sound files (6 hr., 3 min.) digital, wav Transcript: 90 pages An interview with Julie Ault conducted 2017 November 14 and 16, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at a studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Ault speaks of the nature of memory and giving an oral history; her skepticism of linear narratives; leaving rural Maine for Washington, DC at age 17; her family history; her interest in popular culture and commercial culture as a teenager; disco and nightclubs in Washington and New York in the late 1970's; working a variety of day jobs in New York, including a telephone answering service; meeting Tim Rollins for the first time in Maine; her interest in conversation; her relationship to questions; the formation of Group Material in 1979; her relationship with Andres Serrano; Group Material's collaborative dynamic, and its effect on her personal development; the complexities of trying to write or tell history; the shifting configurations and contexts of Group Material over 17 years of activity; mounting, and thinking critically about, individual exhibitions after Group Material; the first AIDS Timeline in 1989; the ephemerality of the Timeline; book projects as a means of depositing personal memories; her first memories of the AIDS crisis beginning in 1983; Group Material's Democracy and AIDS series at Dia in 1988; investigating the tension between art and activism in the context of HIV/AIDS; Karen Ramspacher's entry and contributions to Group Material; the initial decision to employ the form of a timeline and four arenas of research; different audience relationships and reactions to the Timeline; the collaborative process of creating the Timeline; losing NEA funding after the Timeline, amid the early '90s culture wars; Group Material's second exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1990; her friendship with Felix Gonzalez-Torres; Group Material's third exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1991; the Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart exhibition; and an acknowledgement of topics that could not be covered in the interview. Ault also recalls Doug Ashford, Vikky Alexander, Yolanda Hawkins, Mundy McLaughlin, Sarat Maharaj, Gertrud Sandqvist, Marybeth Nelson, Patrick Brennan, Hannah Alderfer, Peter Szypula, Sabrina Locks, Larry Rinder, Richard Meyer, Bill Olander, Marcia Tucker, Gary Garrels, Charles Wright, Frank Wagner, Martin Beck, Nayland Blake, Anne Pasternak, Mary Anne Staniszewski, John Lindell, Tom Kalin, Donald Moffett, Marlene McCarty, Jochen Klein, Lisa Phillips, Andrea Miller-Keller, Steven Evans, and others.

Oral history interview with Alexandra Juhasz, 2017 December 19-21

Archives of American Art
Audio: 6 sound files (5 hr., 56 min.) digital, wav Transcript: 117 pages An interview with Alexandra Juhasz conducted 2017 December 19 and 21, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Juhasz's home in Brooklyn, New York.
Juhasz speaks of her commitment to AIDS activism; her intellectual, bohemian, culturally Jewish upbringing; developing her feminism, political consciousness and activism in high school and college; her relationship with James "Jim" Robert Lamb; moving to New York for graduate school in 1986; the beginning of her AIDS activism and video-making practice in the late '80s; reflecting on her privilege and positionality in her activist work; her commitment to making marginal work; Jim Lamb's role in Video Remains, followed by his death and enduring inspiration for her work; the striking and surprising aspects of participating in an oral history; historical and theoretical underpinnings of video-making as an activist strategy and process; making activist video with the WAVE collective; the stakes, challenges, and costs of marginalized communities fighting for self-representation; making activist video with Swarthmore college students; the artistic milieu of New Queer Cinema; producing The Watermelon Woman and recently re-releasing it; moving to Los Angeles and having a period of silence in AIDS activism; returning to AIDS activism by making Video Remains; her ongoing collaborative writing about AIDS with Theodore Kerr; and her most recent projects. Juhasz also recalls Eve Sedgwick, Joe Guimento, Jon Engebretson, Jean Carlomusto, Tom Kalin, Avram Finkelstein, Amber Hollibaugh, Maxine Wolfe, Miguel Prieto, Robert Vasquez-Pacheco, Charles Ludlam, Everett Quinton, Carolyn Lesjak, Yannick Durand, Juanita Mohammed, Sharon Penceal, Aida Matta, Glenda Hasty, Marcia Edwards, Kenrick Cato, Megan Cunningham, Cheryl Dunye, Zoe Leonard, Pato Hebert, Alisa Lebow, Sarah Schulman, Todd Haynes, Ellen Spiro, and others.

An Oral History of "Star Trek"

Smithsonian Magazine
The trail-blazing sci-fi series debuted 50 years ago and has taken countless fans where none had gone before

Oral History at Home — Five Easy Steps

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Smithsonian Institution Archives historian Hannah Byrne runs through five easy steps to help you get started doing oral history at home. Oral history is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information—primary source material—from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. For more tips about what questions to ask and how to ask them, head to our website. s.si.edu/OralHistoryGuide
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