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observation tube

National Museum of American History

Observation

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Observation Beehive

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by Division of Agriculture and Mining.

Children view the Observation Beehive located in Farm Machinery Hall at the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

Italian Observation #6

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Paper Plate Observation

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson has students simulate the documentation of the Transit of Venus using paper plates and marking the path of the transit. Gives practice with scientific inquiry and recording. Includes related web resources, printable images, and alternative lessons.

Observation and Preservation Pastime

National Postal Museum
I had the pleasure of working with the Preservation Department for a brief three week internship. I focused on two main projects, rehousing postal service badges, and conducting visitor observations. Rehousing, is when you create safe or secure housing for an object. In doing this, I learned the process of how to safely store artifacts, as well as how to make the proper sink mats to house them.

Deep Reef Observation Project

Smithsonian Institution
Off the coast of Curacao, Smithsonian marine biologist Carole Baldwin leads the Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP), an effort to study biodiversity and monitor changes in deep tropical reefs. To learn more go to https://global.si.edu/success-stories/discovering-new-species-through-tropical-reef-biodiversity-research

Villa or observation tower

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Liberty Island, Centennial Observation

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"American Method in Astronomical Observation"

National Museum of American History
From its infancy, timekeeping has depended on astronomy. The motion of celestial bodies relative to the rotating Earth provided the most precise measure of time until the mid-twentieth century, when quartz and atomic clocks proved more constant. Until that time, mechanical observatory clocks were set and continuously corrected to agree with astronomical observations.

The application of electricity to observatory timepieces in the late 1840s revolutionized the way American astronomers noted the exact movement of celestial events. U.S. Coast Survey teams devised a method to telegraph clock beats, both within an observatory and over long distances, and to record both the beats and the moment of observation simultaneously. British astronomers dubbed it the "American method of astronomical observation" and promptly adopted it themselves.

Transmitting clock beats by telegraph not only provided astronomers with a means of recording the exact moment of astronomical observations but also gave surveyors a means of determining longitude. Because the Earth rotates on its axis every twenty-four hours, longitude and time are equivalent (fifteen degrees of longitude equals one hour).

In 1849 William Cranch Bond, then director of the Harvard College Observatory, devised an important improvement for clocks employed in the "American method." He constructed several versions of break-circuit devices—electrical contracts and insulators attached to the mechanical clock movement—for telegraphing clock beats once a second. The Bond regulator shown here incorporates such a device. Bond's son Richard designed the accompanying drum chronograph, an instrument that touched a pen to a paper-wrapped cylinder to record both the beats of the clock and the instant of a celestial event, signaled when an observer pressed a telegraph key.

Observation Quarantine - Board of Health

National Museum of American History
Board of Health: OBSERVATION QUARANTINE: Persons other than those of the household and those legally authorized are forbidden to enter. No person other than those authorized by the Board of Health shall remove this placard. Any person or persons defacing, covering up or destroying this placard render themselves liable to the penalties of the law. Act of the General Assembly approved June 28, 1923, provides that anyone violating the provisions of this Act, upon conviction thereof, may be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than $100.00, to be paid to the use of said county, and costs of prosecution, or to be imprisoned in the county jail for a period of not less than ten days or more than thirty days, or both, at the discretion of the court. By order of the Board of Health.

Military, USA, Army Air Corps, Units, 2nd Observation Squadron. [photograph]

National Air and Space Museum Archives
7. 2nd Obsn Sq. Hangar No. 2 at Nichols Fld, PI. [T]aken with K-10 Camera 1938.

Military, USA, Army Air Corps, Units, 2nd Observation Squadron. [photograph]

National Air and Space Museum Archives
5. 2nd Obsn Sq. Hangar No. 2 at Nichols Fld, PI. [T]aken with K-10 Camera 1938.

Solar Observation Station at Mt. Montezuma, Chile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
At the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at Mt. Montezuma, Chile, cave observatory and solar observation instruments are used in the study of the sun. A man using a solar observation instrument stands outside the cave.

interior of observation car of train

National Museum of American History

Insignia, Observation Squadron 9, United States Navy

National Air and Space Museum
United States Navy Observation Squadron 9 insignia; a gold eye with wing depicted.

This United States Navy Observation Squadron 9 aircraft insignia was part of a collection of original art work commissioned for the Smithsonian Institution through the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression.

Insignia, Observation Squadron 8, United States Navy

National Air and Space Museum
United States Navy Observation Squadron 8 insignia; playing card ace of spades depicted on a black circle surrounded by a white ring; silver background.

This insignia was part of a collection of original art work commissioned for the Smithsonian Institution through the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression.

Tiros (Television Infrared Observation Satellites), NASA. [photograph]

National Air and Space Museum Archives
View of Tiros (Television Infrared Observation Satellite), mounted on stand.

Insignia, Observation Squadron 4, United States Navy

National Air and Space Museum
United States Navy Observation Squadron 4 insignia; a black battleship depicted in the center surrounded by reddish orange "O"' with yellow "V".

This insignia was part of a collection of original art work commissioned for the Smithsonian Institution through the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression.

Tiros (Television Infrared Observation Satellites), NASA. [photograph]

National Air and Space Museum Archives
View of Tiros (Television Infrared Observation Satellite), against a plain background.

Removing Honeycomb from the Observation Beehive

Smithsonian Institution Archives
A staff member removes honeycomb form the Observation Beehive on the second floor of the Arts and Industries Building.

An Old Observation Post at Martincourt

National Museum of American History
A charcoal and watercolor sketch on paper of an old observation post at Martincourt, France. A small platform, reached by a ladder, sits in the canopy of a tree.

Monument in form of an observation tower

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Monument in form of an observation tower

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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