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Woman late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

A woman wearing a green-shouldered brocaded blue dress with a red skirt underneath. On her head is a bowl-shaped hat. Her tiny shoes indicate that her feet have been bound, a tradition among the Chinese upper class.

A Nineteenth Century Adventure

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Are you dreaming of warmer weather? Thinking of summer vacation? Well, imagine living in the year 1897 and the time has come to choose your next vacation. Will it be a summer resort in the US or a trip across the Atlantic? This Anchor Line trade catalog, Anchor Line of United States Mail Steamships, describes more »

Nineteenth Century Book Folders

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
We use books every day. But how is a book actually created? How are the pages folded? How are they cut? For a glimpse into making books in the late nineteenth century, take a look at this 1891-92 Dexter Folder Co. trade catalog titled Dexter Book Folding Machines. The Dexter Folder Co. was located in more »

Planting a Nineteenth Century Garden

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Now that Spring has finally arrived, warmer weather is hopefully here to stay. Flowers are beginning to emerge making it the perfect time to sit outside in the garden enjoying the outdoors. Perhaps you are wondering what to plant in your garden. How about a flower with a vibrant color? Or maybe one with a more »

Planting a Nineteenth Century Garden

Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Now that Spring has finally arrived, warmer weather is hopefully here to stay. Flowers are beginning to emerge making it the perfect time to sit outside in the garden enjoying the outdoors. Perhaps you are wondering what to plant in your garden. How about a flower with a vibrant color? Or maybe one with a more »

A Symphony, Nineteenth Century

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Early nineteenth century stagecoach

National Postal Museum
This is a model of a stagecoach from 1818 that would have been used on such routes. Luggage was placed in the back of the coach, mail in the back or under the driver’s seat. As a rule, the coach carried six passengers, three on each side, but an extra, central seat could be added so proprietors could pack nine people into the space.

The Post Office Department began to contract with stagecoach proprietors to carry the mail in 1785. The contracts did not specify specific types of wagons or stagecoaches, and a variety were used, depending on the proprietor, area of the country, and passenger service demands. The inns and taverns that served as stagecoach rest areas and stops often served as the area’s first post office.

Round and oval topped stages such as those represented by this model first appeared about 1817. They were common along the northeastern seaboard through the early 1830s. Proprietors would post advertisements for their routes, using the phrase 'mail stage' whenever possible to alert potential passengers to a stage line that was required to keep to its posted schedule.

Man with tablet late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears a blue shirt, purple pants, and a yellow hat. He is carrying something on a pole, possibly a tablet such as those used in wedding or funeral processions.

Man with bundle late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears a green robe, yellow hat, and black shoes and carries a read bunder under his left arm.

Man with sword late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears Manchu dress--red overjacket with pink and green robe that has tapered sleeves. He has a blue skirt on under the robe and wears a red and yellow hat with long yellow tassels or feathers (associated with Chinese opera).

Man with parasol late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears a green shirt ad purple pants and carries a yellow-topped, red-trimmed silk parasol.

Behind Closed Doors: How Royalty Lived in Nineteenth-Century Paris

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
This Object of the Day  celebrates one of many treasured objects given by Clare and Eugene V. Thaw to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.  It is republished here in memory of Eugene V. Thaw. Click on this link to read more about the Thaws and their gifts to Cooper Hewitt.    The fashion for commissioning watercolors after...

Junk decorated for a celebration late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

Woman playing the hu-gin late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

A woman sitting on a read chair palying the hu-gin, a two-stringed Chinese instrument played with a bow. The woman wears a purple robe, green pants. three flowers in her hair, and tiny red shoes over her bound feet.

Man with tambourine or chain late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears a grey robe, blue skirt, and red hat with two feathers. The object he holds has been only inconclusively identified.

Laurel Leaves from the Nineteenth Century

Smithsonian Libraries
This post was written by Emily Daniel, Rebecca Durgin, and Shayla Wheat, graduate students in the Smithsonian-Mason History of Decorative Arts Masters Program. Emily, Rebecca, and Shayla were also Graduate Research Assistants in 2015-2016 at the National Museum of American History Library. In anticipation of the thirty-first modern Olympic Games being held in Rio de more »

Watercolor Rediscovered: Whistler in the Nineteenth Century

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Recorded on Sunday, May 19, 2019, 2 pm Meyer Auditorium Freer Gallery of Art In conjunction with the opening of Whistler in Watercolor, explore the development of watercolor in the Victorian era and James McNeill Whistler’s contributions to the genre. This program features talks by experts in British and American art history (Kathleen Foster, Robert L. McNeil, Jr. Curator of American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Robyn Asleson, curator of prints and drawings at the National Portrait Gallery) and a paper conservation specialist (Emily Jacobson, paper and photographs conservator at the Freer|Sackler). The discussion will be moderated by Lee Glazer, director of the Lunder Institute for American Art at Colby College. Beforehand, join us for a 1 pm gallery talk about the exhibition in Freer gallery 10. #WhistlerattheFreer #Whistler #Watercolor #FreerSackler #Smithsonian

Man with red flag and gong late nineteenth century

National Anthropological Archives
Collected in China in the late nineteenth century by merchant family of donor's husband. Donated by Mrs. Alice James Pope, July 30, 1979. Transferred from the artifactual collection to the archives, September 1986.

Description based on research by Emily Hoover, summer intern, Department of Anthropology.

Painting on rice paper

The man wears a green shirt, purple pantaloonsm, and a yellow hat.

"The Nineteenth Century Gallery of Distinguished Americans" Exhbition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 68169.

Digital contact sheet available.

"The Nineteenth Century Gallery of Distinguished Americans" exhibition featuring work by engraver James Barton Longacre at the National Portrait Gallery (NPG), with NPG Director Charles Nagel.

Celebrated women travellers of the nineteenth century

Archives of American Art
Book : 459 p. : ill. Published by W. Swan Sonnenschein & Co.
Item is scanned selectively.

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 3 - Nineteenth-Century Portraiture

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Renée Ater, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Maryland, College Park Anne Lafont, Associate Professor of Art History, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée "Paris--Philadelphia: African Figures around 1800, or Portrait of Yarrow as a Mameluke" Shawn Michelle Smith, Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago "Augustus Washington's Liberian Daguerreotypes and the Civil Contract of Photography" Camara Dia Holloway, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Delaware "'Aglow in the Darkest Vistas': Africa, Racial Fantasy, and the Modernist Self-Fashioning of F. Holland Day"
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