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Our New Museum Stores

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailAmerican Art and the Portrait Gallery share not only a building but also our museum stores. We have two stores that are now under new management with a completely new array of gifts and merchandise that is collection-based. Writer Warren Perry, at the National Portrait Gallery recently spoke with Milissa Ferrari, the new manager of our stores.

Write on the Walls at New Museum’s New Exhibit

Smithsonian Magazine

Most artwork in museums is in its final, finished state, but at the New Museum in New York City, visitors are invited to participate in the creative process. The exhibit, titled "The Neighbors," is Polish artist Pawel Althamer’s American debut. It features many of his sculptures and video—exactly the sort of art you'd expect. But there's also a large space with blank white walls, where people are encouraged to express themselves.

Visitors can write on the walls, floor, or a canvas teepee. Althamer, the Daily Beast says, "takes pleasure in the work’s collective ownership and the negotiations over space and content that the work engenders."

It does sound like fun. The Beast

“Marte and her classmates from the Lower East Side’s New Design High School got first crack at the piece. They made quick work covering the walls with peace signs, vines, and hash tags (#Julieisawesome). Shaden Espinoza, 16, drew a grinning, over-lifesized woman’s face and liked the freedom of it.

“At school, teachers tell you what to do,” Espinoza said. “Here you get to do anything you want. You get to be free.

The absence of rules made for some heated moments in the work’s Berlin iteration, where one visitor painted a swastika and another promptly inked it over.”

Althamer will be at the exhibit, working on sculptures that will be added to the displays. He's also hired street musicians to play outside, with their music broadcast on the third floor of the museum. 

There's one more unique aspect to this exhibit—the price visitors pay for admission. From the museum description

“In many of his previous museum exhibitions, Althamer has used the visibility and resources of the organizing institution to benefit different local communities. For “The Neighbors,” Althamer has initiated a coat drive for the Bowery Mission, the Museum’s neighboring organization, which has been serving the homeless and hungry since 1879. Over the course of the exhibition, visitors who bring new or gently used men’s coats to the New Museum will receive free entry. All the coats will be donated to the Bowery Mission.”

Groundbreaking of the New Anacostia Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in the Torch, July 1985

Ceremonial groundbreaking at 1901 Fort Place, S.E., Washington, D.C., in May 1985, for the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (AM), renamed the Anacostia Museum in 1987. In 1995 the Museum was renamed Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture. After the Smithsonian launched its new National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Museum was renamed Anacostia Community Museum in 2006. Left to right: Museum Historian Louise Hutchinson (AM), Robert Stanton (National Park Service), John Blake (chair of AM board), Ann King (former president of Fort Stanton Citizens Association[FSCA]), James Mayo (ANM exhibit supervisor), Addie Cook (FSCA president), AM Director John Kinard and Secretary Robert McCormick Adams. The museum opened in the Carver Theater building in 1967.

Construction of New National Air and Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Construction on the National Air and Space Museum on October 16, 1973, viewed from the southeast. The ground breaking ceremony for the new museum building was on November 20, 1972.

The New Brooklyn Museum

National Museum of American History
A poster created and carried by Edward Pass at a rally held at the Brooklyn Museum on October 1, 1999 protesting Mayor Guiliani's retaliation against the museum for it's "Sensations" exhibition.

The New Brooklyn Museum

National Museum of American History
A poster created and carried by Edward Pass at a rally held at the Brooklyn Museum on October 1, 1999 protesting Mayor Guiliani's retaliation against the museum for it's "Sensations" exhibition.

Advertisement for New Postal Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in Torch, August 1992

Van Ramey, son of National Museum of American History secretary Joyce Ramey, hops across an art construction featuring postage stamps designed to advertise the new postal museum. On November 6, 1990, Secretary Adams and Anthony Frank, then postmaster general of the United States Postal Service signed an agreement to relocate the National Philatelic Collection, at the National Museum of American History, to a new museum in space allocated by the U.S. Postal Service at the historic City Post Office Building, Massachusetts Avenue and North Capitol Street, N.E.

Museum bulletin / New York State Museum

Smithsonian Libraries
Title from cover.

Issued as: [No.] 119-1 , Education Department bulletin; [no.] 1 -180, University of the State of New York bulletin.

Also available online.

Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

Elecresource

ENT set: Keep only those of interest to ENT. Report of the State Entomologist on Injurious and Other Insects of the State of New York, which were issued as part of the Bulletin, are classed: QL475 .N7N4 ENT

Bulletin - New York State Museum

Smithsonian Libraries
No. 52-79, Bulletin of the University of the state of New York; no. 80-118, Bulletin of the New York State Education Dept.

No. 1-118 issued in the following separately numbered subseries: Archeology, Botany, Economic geology, Entomology, Geology, Mineralogy, Miscellaneous, Paleontology, and Zoology.

No. 12- issued also in the museum's 48th- Annual reports, 1894-

No. 2-10 issued 1887-1890; no. 1, 11-118, issued 1892-1908.

No. 1-54 called also v. 1-10.

Also available online.

Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

No. 2-7 issued under an earlier name of the museum: New York State Museum of Natural History.

Elecresource

ENT set: Keep only those of interest to ENT. The Reports of the State Entomologist on Injurious and Other Insects of the State of New York, which were issued as Bulletins are cataloged separately with call number: QL475 .N7N4 ENT.

New York State Museum bulletin

Smithsonian Libraries
Title from cover.

Also available online.

Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

Subject index: No. 181-no. 319 in no. 322.

Elecresource

Bulletin - New York State Museum

Smithsonian Libraries
GeoRef 0197-7482

Bibliography of agriculture 0006-1530

Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Bulletin / New York State Museum

Smithsonian Libraries
Available also via the World Wide Web; access available via SIL PURL.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Exterior View of Concept Model for New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

The Public Buildings Administration submitted a proposal for a National Air Museum, which was called the Wright Memorial Design, and to build it not on the "Mall" but near Arlington Farms in Virginia or on Theodore Roosevelt Island. Arlington Farms was a temporary housing complex for female civil servants and service members during World War II. Built in 1942-1943 by the United States Government's Federal Works Agency (FWA), Arlington Farms was located on the former site of the United States Department of Agriculture's Arlington Experimental Farm on the grounds of the historic 1,100-acre Custis-Lee family estate in Arlington County, Virginia, outside Washington, D.C.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

View of the exterior of a model for a proposed National Air Museum is of a circular building with four columns. The concept was to create a "National Shrine to Aviation" with three galleries: Wright Brothers Memorial, Pioneer Hall of airplanes to display famous firsts in aviation, and Main Exhibit. This design was not selected.

New Museum of Contemporary Art: Strange Attractors/ Signs of Chaos

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
On the bottom half of the front cover, the present object is enclosed in its original paper wrapper, bound by the spiral on the left and extending over the right edge and to the back, until it again meets the spiral. Text in black type, picking up somewhere in the middle of the narrative, and laid out parallel to the page length, begins on the wrapper recto and continues on the verso. In the lower half of the recto, the text is interrupted by the exhibition catalogue title, Strange Attractors: Signs of Chaos, in large black sans serif type, the words placed unevenly. Lines of capital letters in beige-on-beige form the background; their content appears to be random, except for three lines appearing below the title, New Museum of Contemporary Art/ September 14-November 26, 1989/ Curated by Laura Trippi.

Unlike the page sequence in the unwrapped catalogue, the cardboard covers are placed toward the center. The visible upper half of the first page behind the wrapper shows a fractal image, photographed by Richard K. Voss.

New Museum of Contemporary Art: Strange Attractors/ Signs of Chaos

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The design of this approximately fifty page (unpaginated) spiral bound catalogue of an exhibition of art, inspired by the chaos theory of mathematics, intends to evoke the art itself.

Cover, front: On a black background, the exhibition title, Strange Attractors: Signs of Chaos, is imprinted in the natural taupe of the cardboard material in bold sans serif type, the letters placed unevenly over the entire surface; the exhibition venue, New Museum of Contemporary Art, is imprinted in identical type and style, but smaller.

Cover, back: A grid pattern is formed by overlapping lines of black type, set within narrow margins on the natural cardboard.

Content: Text and accompanying illustrations are reproduced on pages of various sizes, inserted vertically or horizontally, and placed in random order. Typography may vary from essay to essay, or within any one essay, in layout, style, size and case.

Concept Model of Interior for the New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Early concept model of the main floor interior for a new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum), designed by Gyo Obata of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK). Visible In this open top model of the first floor for a "Museum for the Space Age" are airplanes, rockets, people inside the museum as well as people and cars on the outside.

Concept Model of Exterior for New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

Preliminary design for a National Air Museum on a proposed site in the Washington, D.C. Southwest Redevelopment area bounded by Independence Avenue, 9th Street,12th Street, and C Street, Southwest. That area is a part of what is now known as L'Enfant Plaza.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model called the "Wineglass Design", submitted by McKim, Mead & White, Architects, for a proposed new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum) is an exterior view of the building taken at street level from the northeast.

Concept Model of East End for New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

Preliminary design for a National Air Museum on a proposed site in the Washington, D.C. Southwest Redevelopment area bounded by Independence Avenue, 9th Street,12th Street, and C Street, Southwest. That area is a part of what is now known as L'Enfant Plaza.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model called the "Wineglass Design", submitted by McKim, Mead & White, Architects, for a proposed new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum) building, shows the East End from the street level. It was designed to have three galleries called Wright Diorama, Hall of Famous Firsts, and main exhibit. This architectural firm was not selected.
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