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Nature

Smithsonian Libraries
Founded and for many years edited by Sir J.N. Lockyer.

Chemical abstracts 0009-2258

CD-ROM and print supplements accompany many numbers.

Also available online.

Beginning [1997] also available online via the World Wide Web by subscription; access available via SIL PURL.

Vol. 229-246, Jan. 1971-Dec. 1973, issued in three parts. The two new parts, Nature: new biology, and Nature: physical sciences, continued the volume numbering of Nature in addition to carrying their own issue numbering. With vol. 246, Dec. 1973, Nature: new biology, and Nature: physical sciences, ceased publication and were absorbed by Nature.

Beginning in 1994 complemented by Nature structural biology, which consists of articles on structural biology for a more specialist audience.

Editorially independent from the journal Nature cell biology, but shares with that journal referees' comments on submitted articles, May 1999-

Elecresource

Nature

National Museum of American History

Nature Study

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Study of edible plants from nature.

Nature Study

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Study of plants with long branches or stems and flowers.

Nature study

Smithsonian Libraries
Also available online.

Elecresource

Mother Nature

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Nature Salons: Nature of Architecture

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Designers from Ensamble Studio and CAVE Bureau in conversation with Matilda McQuaid, Deputy Curatorial Director. A panel discussion with architects featured in Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial. These designers investigate the relationship between the built environment and the natural world by denoting ways in which their work interacts with, interrupts, or complements nature. By emphasizing their design processes, the panelists explore their inspiration, choice of materials, and the context in which they work. This talk coincides with the exhibition Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial on view through January 2020.

Nature Salons: Nature of Architecture

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image of panelists on the stage at Cooper Hewitt, from Ensamble Studios and from Cave architects. The people on the left are in a black suit and vibrant blue woman's suit coat. The two no the right wear colorful African/Kenyan dress, in royal blue and orange patterned.Designers from Ensamble Studio and CAVE Bureau in conversation with Matilda McQuaid, Deputy Curatorial Director.

From Nature

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image features a view of Storm King Mountain from across the Hudson River. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.This drawing is signed “From Nature, by E. Whitefield” and depicts a view of Storm King Mountain from across the Hudson River on the base of Breakneck Ridge. Today it is possible to visit the same viewpoint where Edwin Whitefield sketched the composition and admired the beauty of the landscape. Edwin Whitefield was born in...

nature's children

National Museum of American History

Vitrified Nature

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image features a tall conical vase with a narrow neck and flaring mouth, the opaque glass body showing peach- and amber-colored flowers on a yellow to deep crimson background. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.To celebrate the opening of Nature by Design: Botanical Expressions (December 7, 2019-January 10, 2021), Object of the Day this week will feature objects from the exhibition. Growing up in Nancy, France, in the 1850s, Emile Gallé liked going to the city’s botanical gardens and walking the surrounding countryside of Lorraine. His interest in nature...

Nature Patterns

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Next Nature

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster depicting a frontal, partial silhouette of a man, against a blue, green, and yellow background (colors fade into each other, from top to bottom). The man is covered with colorful text and imagery, suggesting the power of mass communication. A spinning gear appears in place of his genitalia. Printed in blue ink, along top: THE BIGGEST VISUAL POWER SHOW; in blue and yellow ink, center: NEXT NATURE. Other text printed in red, yellow, orange, blue, white, and green in various places across man's body.

Nature Mort

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Vertical rectangle. Cubistic composition sohwing a banjo and other objects on a table. Number 24 of a limited edition of 99, hand-printed by George Lockwood from the original woodblock designed by Picasso and cut by Georges Aubert for the publisher Ambroise Vollard.

Nature's Remedy

National Museum of American History

nature's workbench

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

Toby's nature

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

nature untamed

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

Toby's nature

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

Nature's Remedy

National Museum of American History

Nature's Remedy

National Museum of American History

Nature's Remedy

National Museum of American History

Nature's Creation Co's Discovery

National Museum of American History

Sketch From Nature

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Center, tree with vegetation surrounding it. Below, title, lower left, group of rabbits peering at figure. Lower right, profile of young girl writing, sitting by tree.
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